Labor Unions Are Integral To Our Country, And They Need Our Help

Labor Unions Are Integral To Our Country, And They Need Our Help

Organized labor has been a staple of this country for generations, and its' decline is forever associated with various declines in our standard of living.

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USW, UAW, Teamsters, AFSCME. Those may just sound like odd names to many, but to me and many American workers, they are the myriad labor unions that have been integral to our country and its' blue-collar population. They have helped in many ways to defend workers, give them good benefits plans, and to protect their salary and ability to work from corporations.

Now? They have been in decline for decades, and sit at just 10.7% of all workers according to U.S. government estimates. This is a remarkably low number for the United States' workforce and is also another sad part of the economic stagnation of the U.S. since union membership began to collapse.

It might seem a bit odd to believe that unions and income inequality would be linked: you would expect that, maybe as a gesture of goodwill, corporation executives might offer better benefits to retain talent.

This could not be further from the truth. Studies have indicated that unions have a positive effect from members to nonmembers.

In a study conducted measuring average household income from 1973-2015, researchers found that there was a robust correlation between income inequality and union decline. In fact, the study found that the wages of nonunion workers would have been 3-7% higher if union membership rates were noticeably higher.

This dramatic increase in income inequality can be attributed to multiple factors: increasing automation, workers being reduced to performing increasingly less-intricate tasks, outsourcing, college-degree preference and so on. However, as time has gone on and research has been conducted, unions have been shown to benefit society and counter income inequality via actions such as fighting for broader access to healthcare, which has been a key facet of income inequality.

Though unions are far weaker now than they have been historically, we have still seen their power: In Los Angeles, unions were able to help negotiate better pay and funding for school teachers. In West Virginia, unions were center-stage as the many teachers who wanted more money were granted by the governor.

As one can see, unions still have a part to play in our country and its' economy.

Unions remain integral to how we function. Without unions, many of the benefits, payment plans, and healthcare options would not exist. And that is why I am partial to unions: unions allowed for socioeconomic ascendancy, a better life for families, and a chance to live a good life despite not having the luxury of a college degree.

In a time where the world is saturated with degrees and not enough trade school workers, unions might just become essential yet again. I, for one, would welcome that. As a kid from Ohio, union workers are prevalent, and protecting them now and later is integral.

Support your local to rebuild the American dream.

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I'm The College Girl Who Likes Trump And Hates Feminism, And Living On A Liberal Campus Is Terrifying

I will not sugarcoat it: I don't feel safe on my own campus.

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I will get right to the point: being a conservative on a liberal college campus in 2019 downright terrifying.

At my university, I'm sure about 90% of the population, both students and faculty, are liberals. They are very outspoken, never afraid to express their views, opinions, and feelings in several ways. There are pride events for the LGBT community, a huge celebration for MLK day, and tons of events for feminists.

Then there's the minority: the conservatives. The realists. The "racists," "bigots," and "the heartless." I am everything the liberals absolutely despise.

I like Donald Trump because he puts America first and is actually getting things done. He wants to make our country a better place.

I want a wall to keep illegals out because I want my loved ones and me to be safe from any possible danger. As for those who are genuinely coming here for a better life, JUST FILL OUT THE PAPERWORK INSTEAD OF SNEAKING AROUND.

I'm pro-life; killing an infant at nine months is inhumane to me (and yet liberals say it's inhumane to keep illegals out…but let's not get into that right now).

I hate feminism. Why? Because modern feminism isn't even feminism. Slandering the male species and wanting to take down the patriarchy is just ridiculous.

I hate the media. I don't trust anyone in it. I think they are all biased, pathological liars. They purposely make our president look like the devil himself, leaving out anything good he does.

I will not sugarcoat it: I don't feel safe on my own campus.

I mostly keep my opinions to myself out of fear. When I end up getting one of my "twisted" and "uneducated" thoughts slip out, I cringe, waiting for the slap in the face.

Don't get me wrong; not everyone at my university is hostile to those who think differently than they do.

I've shared my opinions with some liberal students and professors before, and there was no bloodshed. Sure, we may not see eye to eye, but that's okay. That just means we can understand each other a little better.

Even though the handful of students and faculty I've talked to were able to swallow my opinions, I'm still overwhelmed by the thousands of other people on campus who may not be as kind and attentive. But you can't please everybody. That's just life.

Your school is supposed to be a safe environment where you can be yourself. Just because I think differently than the vast majority of my peers doesn't mean I deserve to be a target for ridicule. No one conservative does. Scratch that, NO ONE DOES.

I don't think I'll ever feel safe.

Not just on campus, but anywhere. This world is a cruel place. All I can do is stand firm in my beliefs and try to tolerate and listen to the clashing opinions of others. What else can I do?

All I can say is... listen. Be nice. Be respectful of other's opinions, even if you strongly disagree. Besides, we all do have one thing in common: the desire for a better country.

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10 Practical Ways To Gain Hands-On Experience That'll Advance Your Career Before It Even Gets Started

You know about internships, but did you know all the other practical ways to get your first job out of college?

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If you're reading this, you probably feel like you're in the hot seat right about now.

Your resume is daunting.

You're feeling the pressure that every soon-to-be college graduate feels.

Don't get me wrong, post-college life is thrilling, but it's also incredibly terrifying if you don't have a job lined up and your resume is minimal at best.

But you're also not alone. Everyone around you is in the same boat or has at least been there before.

And while all your college professors tell you about the importance of internships, not everyone tells you these 10 practical ways to gain experience.

1. Volunteer Your Time

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Hardly anyone will turn down free help. Find a place to volunteer your time even if it's not even close to your field. You'd be surprised how much you learn and how many people you meet.

2. Start freelancing.

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You'd be surprised how many people hire freelancers for their projects. Starting on Upwork or other bidding sites might be too difficult at first, but this is where you have to be a little bolder. Do your research, find developing businesses, and offer your services

3. Join a club on campus.

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So this tip is mainly for those still in college. Being on the leadership for a club on campus gives you certain responsibilities that develop your skills. If you're not involved and you still have time, get involved.

4. Shadow someone in your field.

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Chances are you know someone in your field and if you don't, you know someone who does. Your professors have connections and there are ways. Ask for an hour or two of their time to interview them and then ask to shadow them or if they know someone willing. Again, a little boldness required.

5. Temp everywhere!

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Contrary to most college students' beliefs, you're not going to get your dream career on your first try. Send your resume to temp agencies and figure out what the best fit for you through there. It gets you a lot of experience and taste of a little bit of everything.

6. Start your own business.

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So many people talk about one day opening up their own business when they have the resources, but time is a resource and this is a season in your life that you'll find a lot of it. Do your research, figure out how much it takes to start, and do it! Yes, sounds a lot easier than it is but you'll learn what you can and your portfolio will grow.

7. Accept the jobs you think are beneath you.

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If you think that flipping burgers and taking orders are beneath you, you just said goodbye to valid customer service experience...just saying.

8. Learn to take a break.

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If this isn't obvious for you yet, then it's time to take a break from the application process.

9. Steward your resources.

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Yes, this doesn't sound like hands-on experience but if you don't learn how to balance out your life now, throwing in a career isn't going to help you.

10. Network, Network, Network

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No matter where you are, network. This helps you practice effective communication and it'll also help you get a job even if it takes a while at first.

Finding a job can be a disheartening process. But it's important to remember that it is, in fact, a process. It'll take time, but don't give up. You'll be surprised what you can do in the process that'll get you to where you want to be.

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