The Ultimate Guide To Being An Odyssey EIC

The Ultimate Guide To Being An Odyssey EIC

Step by step instructions to creating a thriving Odyssey community.
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Ever wondered what it takes to become the Odyssey Editor in Chief of your dreams? Here's a complete guide straight from Odyssey HQ that will ensure you don't miss a thing! Follow these daily tips to build a thriving community.

Sunday

Contact exec team

Objective: Get in touch with your exec team debrief and strategize for the week. This is a great time to start planning a team meeting or just discuss their individual responsibilities.

Email debrief to CS

Objective: The goal of a debrief email is for you as EIC to understand your own team and be able to verbalize those things to your CS. The best debrief emails help you not only take stock of your team on Sunday but as a touch base throughout the following week.

Before Sunday night you should send a debrief email from the weekend. This debrief should also inform specific concerns to address on your EIC call this week or next.

Resources:

Sunday Debrief Email

Post in Group

Objective: Sunday afternoon (after your debrief) is a great time to reach out to your Creators as a team. Encourage them for the week ahead, remind them to submit Wednesday and get them talking. It’s always best to get a conversation going --- gauge if they are having any problems and make sure they know they have your support if needed.


Monday

Post in Group

Objective: #MondayMotivation -- Send an inspirational message to your team to get them excited about the week.

Metrics update from CS

Objective: Your Content Strategist will be editing most of the day, so this will likely be the only time today you hear from them. The goal of this update is to consolidate their EIC tracking doc into one easy message, reminding you of your team’s goal and breaking down how far you have left to go in the month.

Share Articles, Social Strategy

Objective: Only 16 percent of your friends will see what you post on Facebook. Re-sharing promising content shows Facebook you are an active User and willing to stay on the site. Spend about an hour testing new headlines, cover photos and social briefs to see what works for your friends.

Step 1: Work with your CS to get the week and month’s content. If a CS reaches out to you about an article shared on Odyssey's owned social, rally your community to comment on that post, like it, & share it.

Step 2: Look specifically at the top performers and at the content you and your CS thought had potential but didn’t do as well as you hoped. What can you do better?

Step 3: Consider changing the headline and cover photo

Step 4: (for both top performers and potential top performers): Have the Creator re-share the updated content with a new social brief

Objective: Sharing in large, relevant Facebook groups is a great way to spread your content on Facebook without relying solely on your network of friends.

Step 1: Check out the content you had this month and see if it’s relevant to a broader audience.

Step 2: Join groups with more than 1,000 members. Check the description to make sure you can share outside links

Step 3: Share the article and pose a question or have a strong pull-quote in the social brief

Step 4: Engage with the people commenting on the post.

Resource: 6 Ways You Can Crack Facebook's Code



Objective: Share on multiple platforms to reach different types of audience. The people who frequent Twitter may not necessarily use StumbleUpon and the people who are on Reddit may not be on Facebook. Take in consideration the type of content that is often shared on each site and be smart about where and when to share on other platforms.

Step 1: Analyze what content can do well on platforms other than Facebook. Ex: Twitter: news, celebrities; Reddit: long-form; Pinterest: quotes, fitness

Step 2: Note posting dead zones and avoid them

Step 3: Post with an engaging social brief if necessary


Tuesday

Article Ideas

Objective: Tuesday is the perfect time to start brainstorming content ideas for the deadline tomorrow. Spend about an hour Tuesday afternoon reviewing the ideas your Content Strategist sent to you and thinking about what type of content would perform well within your community. Send these ideas to your creators.

Step 1: Take into account things like trending content on Odyssey this week (you can find this in your Odyssey newsletter), trending content from your community this week, timely events and content that has performed well historically for you. You can also check trending content on Facebook or Twitter each week.

Step 2: Talk to your Creators about noteworthy topics, and work with them to develop their own ideas.

Step 3: Send Creators Odyssey's Library Of Digital Media Resources.

Call with CS (Weekly or Bi-weekly)

Objective: A successful EIC call gives you everything you need for the current week and the month overall. (Your Sunday debrief email will also dictate where this call leads.) You will typically be on a bi-weekly call schedule but talk with your CS to determine if a weekly call would work better for you.

Step 1: Prep for your EIC Call. You should come prepared with team updates (which Creators did not submit and why, who is new on your team) as well as questions or troubles you’re having as EIC. It’s also helpful to note anything new you’ve learned, as well as anything you’d like to learn from your CS this week.

Step 2: Jump on a 30-minute call with your CS.

Check Requests

Objective: Members of your community will request an invite to join your team at any time. Check Muse at least twice per week for any requests and contact those applicants.

Step 1: Check Muse for requests.

Step 2: Contact requests to gauge their interest in joining your team.

Step 3: Onboard creators you think are great cultural fits for your team. Follow this process.

Outreach

Objective: Your team is constantly growing and changing, and new Creators could be just around the corner.

Step 1: Use your network! Reach out to friends, sorority sisters, club members, teammates, and classmates and tell them about the opportunity. Look for leaders within your community and across your campus.

Step 2: Post on your own personal social media + ask your team posts their own social media blurb about joining Odyssey!

Step 3: Email clubs and organizations to pass along a message on their listserv.

Resource: Try posting this message around on Facebook: "Odyssey is looking for Content Creators! Hoping to build your resume without interrupting your schedule? Odyssey democratizes the way stories are told online. We believe multiple perspectives, opinions, and ideas should be captured and heard, shared, and amplified on a worldwide scale. Hyperlocal voices looking to gain digital exposure and a clipbook of work should request an invite to join the platform. Why not start today? Request an invite here: https://muse.theodysseyonline.com/apply


Wednesday

(Creators submit deadline by 5 p.m.)

Post in Group

Objective: Coach team to submit on time today. Shout out rock star Creators for things like views, shares or culture from the week prior. It will help encourage creators to submit on time.

Call with CS (Weekly or Bi-weekly)


Thursday

Post in Group

Objective: Roundup any creators that missed the deadline.

Edit Content

Objective: By now, each of your Creators should have at least one piece in. Spend this time working through your line edits & packaging content.

Step 1: Read through the entire piece, correcting grammar and syntax errors. Make sure to leave comments noting your changes or encouraging your Creator.

Step 2: Ensure the piece is packaged well.

Step 3: Schedule the share.

Step 4: As you edit, write down headlines of pieces you think will do well to include in your debrief email later on.

Step 5: As you edit, mark off Creators who have submitted on your tracking doc.

Resources:

EIC Editing 101

Tracking Doc

Download Grammarly, a Google Chrome extension to help with editing

Package Content (in tandem with editing)

Objective: You want to make your team’s articles the most attractive articles on the web.

Step 1: Make sure cover photos are attention-grabbing. Make sure cover photos are attention-grabbing. Use Pexels, Unsplash, and Kaboompics for free stock photos that are also aesthetically pleasing.

Step 2: The headline should be concise and creative. If it’s a listicle, include the number of items in the headline

Step 3: The social media brief is the subhead or a blurb that teases the article.

Step 4: Choose a time you believe the article will do best. Monday at 10 a.m. is always a great time to schedule a post because content begins to take off at that time.

Step 5: Make sure the Creator has an engaging social share. Blatant self-promotion puts the content at the bottom of the Newsfeed. Consider having them change the share text to a strong pull-quote or a question.

Resources:

How To Craft The Perfect Headline

Copyright

Odyssey's Library Of Digital Media Resources

Call with CS (Weekly or Bi-weekly)

Check Requests

Objective: Members of your community will request an invite to join your team at any time. Check Muse at least twice per week for any requests and contact those applicants.

Step 1: Check Muse for requests.

Step 2: Contact requests to gauge their interest in joining your team.

Step 3: Onboard creators you think are great cultural fits for your team. Follow this process.


Friday

All edits are done (By Noon)

Objective: Ensure that all edits are completed for your CS to tackle. Content will go live from your CS first thing Monday morning and throughout the week.

Make sure weekly email is sent to your community (By 5 p.m.)

Objective: Keeping your community updated is an essential part of the EIC role.

Emails should include, but not limited to:

1. Reminders & announcements

2. Creator // article shoutouts

3. Metrics updates

4. A tip of the week (how to share your article, how to format properly, etc.)

***

Want to build an exec team?

Why should you build an editorial executive team to help you out?

1. Creator experience outside the Odyssey bubble: Giving creators the opportunity to take on leadership and responsibility that they can carry onto future opportunities depending on their career trajectory

2. These positions dont diminish the EIC role as it is now or what it could be in the future. Rather, these different leadership roles give the EIC the opportunity to hold his/her executive team accountable. The EIC is partaking in all of the other leaders responsibilities, but has a direct person who knows everything about a particular EIC task [i.e., The EIC understands Facebooks algorithm and can coach creators around packaging, but the social media director makes it a point to research best practices to present to EIC, do smart sharing hacks, etc.]

3. Giving creators these titles specifically presents new opportunities for them to interact with different counterparts across the country, just as EICs do now in the Facebook group. There can also be opportunities for them to benefit from group calls with NYCs best outreach specialists, audience development team, or culture queens

4. This doesn’t need to be seen much differently from any other structure in any other organization (i.e. Greek Life has a president & a board, the U.S. president has a cabinet, Odyssey HQ has different departments working in tandem, etc.)

Here are the positions you can bring on:

1. Outreach Specialist

2. Social Media Director

3. Community Health Manager

4. Contributing Editor

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To The Teacher Who Was So Much More

Thank you for everything
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I think it's fair to say that most people remember at least one teacher who had a lasting impact on them. I have been incredibly lucky to have several teachers who I will never forget, but one individual takes the cake. So here's to you: thank you for all you have done.

Thank you for teaching me lessons not just in the textbook.

Although you taught a great lecture, class was never just limited to the contents of the course. Debates and somewhat heated conversations would arise between classmates over politics and course material, and you always encouraged open discussion. You embraced the idea of always having an opinion, and always making it be heard, because why waste your voice? You taught me to fight for things I believed in, and to hold my ground in an argument. You taught me to always think of others before doing and speaking. You showed me the power of kindness. Thank you for all the important lessons that may not have been included in the curriculum.

Thank you for believing in me.

Especially in my senior year, you believed in me when other teachers didn't. You showed me just what I could accomplish with a positive and strong attitude. Your unwavering support kept me going, especially when I melted into a puddle of tears weekly in your office. You listened to my stupid complaints, understood my overwhelming stress-induced breakdowns, and told me it was going to be okay. Thank you for always being there for me.

Thank you for inspiring me.

You are the epitome of a role model. Not only are you intelligent and respected, but you have a heart of gold and emit beautiful light where ever you go. You showed me that service to others should not be looked at as a chore, but something to enjoy and find yourself in. And I have found myself in giving back to people, thanks to your spark. Thank you for showing me, and so many students, just how incredible one person can be.

Thank you for changing my life.

Without you, I truly would not be where I am today. As cliche as it sounds, you had such a remarkable impact on me and my outlook on life. Just about a year has passed since my graduation, and I'm grateful to still keep in touch. I hope you understand the impact you have made on me, and on so many other students. You are amazing, and I thank you for all you have done.

Cover Image Credit: Amy Aroune

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Studying the LSAT and Working Full Time

How to make room for advancing your future while maintaining the present.

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Working full time and studying for the LSAT proves a delicate tightrope that many people grapple to tread. If you find yourself in such a situation, then some good news is on the horizon as many have juggled the requirements of both aspects seamlessly in the past. Today we take a look at what these individuals did and how you too can effectively balance the scales without leaning too much to one side or the other.


Starting early

Having a full-time job leaves little morsels of time to work with and often the best approach entails beginning early so that the collective total makes up constructive study hours in the long run. As a general rule of thumb for the working class, start a minimum of 4 but preferably 6 months to the date of the test. Science dictates that there are half a dozen intellectual and quality hours per day and with a demanding job breathing down your neck, you can only set aside about a third of that for productive LSAT test prep. With 3 months being the measure of ideal study time for a full-time student, you'll need double that period to be sufficiently up to par.


Maximizing your mornings

Studying in the evenings after a grueling and intellectually draining day at work is as good as reading blank textbooks. It's highly unlikely you'll be able to grasp complex concepts at this time, so start your mornings early so that you can devote this extra time when you are at your mental pinnacle to unraveling especially challenging topics. Evening study times should only be for refresher LSAT prep or going through light subject matters requiring little intellectual initiative. For those who hit their stride at night, take some time to unwind and complete your chores before getting down to business well before bedtime.

Taking some time off

All work and no play does indeed make Jack a dull boy and going back and forth between work and study is a sure-fire recipe for disaster. So take some time off of work every now and then, preferably during weekdays- you can ask for a day off every fortnight or so- as weekends are a prime study period free of work obligations. Such breaks reduce fatigue, better study performance and increase the capacity for information retention.

Prioritizing study

Given the scarce oasis of free time in your busy schedule, you cannot afford to miss even a single session and this commitment is important in spreading out the burden so that it is not overwhelming as you approach the finish line. Be sure to have a clear schedule in place and even set reminders/alarms to help enforce your timetable. If it's unavoidable to miss a single session, set aside a makeup as soon as possible.


Last but not least, have a strong finish. Once you are approaching the home run i.e. about 2 or 3 weeks to the test, take this time off to shift your focus solely to the test. The last month can make or break your LSAT test prep and it'll be hard to concentrate on working whilst focusing completely on the test.

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