Odyssey EIC Editing 101

Odyssey EIC Editing 101

Your go-to guide for editing as an Odyssey EIC.
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Here's your go-to guide for Odyssey EIC editing:

What is your Editor Dashboard?

  • “Editor Dashboard” is where you go to find the articles of all of your Creators, including yourself, for that week. Each article will be labeled according to what stage of the editing process that has been completed.

  • Each Saturday/Sunday go into your Editor Dashboard and see who has submitted (Needs Edit) from your community.
  • Keep track of who your top creators are, who submitted, and who was just onboarded as a new creator.

Editing:

  • Because the creator submitted (hopefully) before the start of the new posting cycle, you will need to go back a week in your dashboard to edit. Toggle the calendar arrow to the left one week.
  • Click on the headline of an article that ‘Needs Edit’. Once in the article, scroll down to the body of the piece. Is it a listicle? Is it a poem? Is it an article?
    • If it is a listicle:
      • Make sure there is a small intro paragraph written by the creator to introduce what the listicle is about (could be 2-3 sentences)
      • The numbered items are in Header 2. Highlight the text needed to be in Header 2, click on the Formatting button to the far left on the top of the editing box (next to HTML). Once in the formatting options, click Header 2. Do this for the remaining numbered items on the list.
      • If there are images/gifs in the listicle make sure they are centered and attributed.
    • If it is an article
      • Are there breaks in the wording? Too long of a paragraph can mean that a reader may feel too overwhelmed to reading it. Breaking it up makes it more appealing
      • Make sure that the first paragraph is packaged well. It is enticing, has an intriguing, relatable sentence, and will capture the attention of a reader.
  • Once the body of the piece is done, you will scroll down to the Headline, Sub-Headline, and Cover Photo. These are KEY to grabbing the attention of potential readers.
  • Headline
  • Make sure that each word in the Headline is capitalized. Also, if it is a listicle, then make sure that all numerical words are numbered in the headline (not written out).
    • The Subheadline is also important to grabbing the attention of the reader. It is a piece that gives a little bit of what the article is about, enough to tease the reader. Using a captivating pull-quote, funny blurb, or something of that variety is always best when including the subheadline. Sub-Headlines are always written like a sentence with the first letter of the first word capitalized and a period at the end.

  • You must think about why people share content. People generally do not read an article all the way through, they share based on the headline and the image, then will read the piece.
  • If the headline is vague — “An Open Letter To My Mom/Best Friend/Dog” — nobody will read that piece. Let’s look at the top trending articles on Odyssey when I’m writing this:
    • I'm A Woman And I'm Not With Her — NOT “An Open Letter To Hillary Clinton”
    • Why Your Grandma Is Your Biggest Blessing In Life — NOT “What My Grandma Means To Me”
    • The Coach That Killed My Passion — NOT “What It’s Like Having A Bad Coach”
    • Losing a Grandparent Changed My Life — NOT “What It’s Like Losing A Grandparent”
  • There is no ambiguity here. People will share these because they know what the articles are about and they want these messages on their Facebook or Twitter pages because they agree or strongly disagree with them. Be clear, be concise.
  • There is also an ego factor — people love sharing articles that show traits they want to embody themselves. Articles like “Why Your Grandma Is Your Biggest Blessing In Life” are viral because people want to be seen as the sort of person who loves their grandma, so they put it on their wall. Think about what your article will “say” about a person who shares it. The more people who can use an article to show off some positive trait about themselves
  • Images
    • Use Pexels, Pixabay, Wikimedia, Flickr creative commons, Unsplash, Stocksnap, Splitshire, StartupStockPhotos, or Public Domain Pictures to get ones we know we can use.
    • When choosing an image, do not use text-only images, do not use quotes on images, do not use pictures without people in them when at all possible.
    • Personal pictures are the best, if the quality is good.
    • Pictures with people in them are better than pictures without people.
    • Landscapes, sunsets, pictures of the ocean, etc., might be pretty, but they do not encourage people to click!
    • It is KEY to have each creator attribute their own photos. Google is not an attribution.
  • Tagging is a great way to gain engagement without doing much after your creator submits. Generally around 5-8 tags is optimal to be engaged with. Make sure they are a mix of specific and general things related to the article. When being searched in Odyssey and SEO they will be pulled.

  • Have your creators choose a segment for their pieces to further give the piece an identity. This can also help make the piece easily searchable and is good for SEO searching.
  • The metadata title and description are important for search engine optimization as well. Recommended is to use the same title and description as the Headline and Sub-headline.
  • The Publish & Share area is V important.

  • Always schedule it for that Monday morning (optimal times are 8-10am in your timezone). Or schedule it for the evening (4-8pm your time zone).
  • Make sure that all articles edited are scheduled to be posted on Monday’s date, and that the scheduled social media share is scheduled for Monday at the preferred time.
  • Social Media Brief
    • Should be the same concept as the subheadline. Should not say, “Check out my article!” or “Share my article." Always make sure that it is something enticing just like the headline, subheadline, and cover photo.
  • When you’re finished editing, select “Accept as EIC Edited.” The queue will automatically bring you to your next article.

***Don’t be afraid to reject a piece if these things are not completed by creators. The “Reject” button will mark the article as “Needs Revision.” Content Creators are sent an email notification on their article being rejected. As a rule of thumb, never reject an article without leaving comments for the content Creator. Beware to let the creator know the issues if not completed within 24 hours of rejecting (text/email them). And be aware when they are complete so that you may post their piece.

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22 Girl Names Your Random College Roommate Will Have, And The Type Of Roommate They Are

Will she be your BFF?
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Every roommate situation in college is going to be different.

All you can do is hope and pray that they'll just leave you alone for the most part. A lot of the time, you can get a hint about what kind of roommate they'll be just knowing their first name.

1. Hailey

Her dad pays her rent. She can't cook. Litters the kitchen with take out boxes from the local vegan joint.

2. Beth

Totally wants you to go to SoulCycle with her at 6 a.m. on a Saturday. Room is littered with leggings and sneakers.

3. Michelle

Comes home at 3 a.m. after a night of heavy drinking. Loudly makes some sort of frozen meal. Sleeps through her noon alarm.

4. Victoria

Probably has dark hair and an acoustic guitar. Keeps pretty much to herself. Does homework in the living room at obscure hours.

5. Madison

Was on the dance team in high school and has not stopped telling you about how great it was. Does work out videos on the TV in the living room.

6. Kim

Brings her boyfriend over every night of the week. Brings different boys home on the weekends.

7. Megan

Actively avoids cleaning the bathroom. Leaves her dishes in the sink. You haven't seen her shower in four days.

8. Erica

Normal. Quiet. Wants to be a high school English teacher.

9. Erika

Wild. Emotionally distraught always. Is always hosting the pre-game. Never comes home with all of the clothes she left wearing.

10. Sarah

"Definitely should have got into Harvard, but I ended up here instead." Too into trying to get a 4.0 to pay attention to you.

11. Julia

Studies music performance. Screams expletives at her keyboard. Cannot play the trumpet, but still tries really hard.

12. Hannah

So tall she almost hits her head on the doorways. Plays basketball. Raps to old Kanye in the shower.

13. Jenny

Should not be allowed to go out. Goes out every weekend anyway. Throws up in your bathtub and doesn't always address it in the morning.

14. Heather

Stressing about her internship. Is currently failing all of her classes. Will somehow still get a 3.5 GPA this semester.

15. Grace

You never see her, only the hairballs she leaves all around your place.

16. Emma

Only has guy friends because "it's easier." Guy friends who leave empty beer cans out after every sporting event on TV.

17. Caitlyn

Has a 4.0 as a biology major. Is going to med school. Sterilizes her room, the bathroom and the kitchen sink every four hours.

18. Sam

Always has a paper about feminism to write. Rosie the Riveter poster in her room.

19. Alex

Is probably dating her boss. Has straight Ds in all her classes.

20. Taylor

Is somehow always home when you're home. You know nothing about her other than where she's from.

21. Alyssa

Trying to become the next big YouTuber. Has lighting equipment all over the place. You constantly hear the phrase, "Hey guys, welcome to my channel!" She squealed because yesterday she hit 25 subscribers.

22. Jesse

Is probably plotting your murder. Lurks around like a cat.

Cover Image Credit: Morgan Yates//YouTube

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How I Selected A College

Selecting a college is stressful, this is about to affect the rest of your life.
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Selecting a college can be very stressful, as I just did it about a year ago I remember clearly what had helped.

The first thing you have to do is find a college 'smart-match'. My high school provided us with one but I'm pretty sure you can find one on google. From this smart-match, you can put in a lot of different aspects that you might be looking for or considering in a college like price, different groups on campus, diversity, religion, location, and size of the school.

After you find some colleges you're interested in, VISIT CAMPUS! I found that the singular, most important aspect of choosing a college was the campus. Does it feel like it could be your home? If not, don't brush off the feeling that maybe you won't get used to it and comfortable with it because if you never do, you'll be miserable.

One of the other main important aspects is the location, are you more comfortable in the city, a suburb, or rural areas? These aspects also depict the number of stores that will be around campus and if you don't have a car, but love to shop, maybe a rural area isn't the best place for you to go to college.

After this part, I was still stuck between two colleges.

So, I made a pro's and con's list which made my life ten times easier. For this, I considered the size, how I felt being on campus, and where my friends were. And I know most people will tell you to NOT consider your friends, but if you're like me, considering friends was important. I didn't base my decision just off of my friends, but they were on my pro's list for a specific college because i'm not good at making friends and if I was comfortable at the college, I didn't see any problem with that.

The last tip I have, although it didn't happen with me, is don't follow your significant other to college. If you're just interested in colleges your significant other is interested in, there might be a problem there. For college you have to think with your own brain, otherwise you risk breaking up (because it's a high school relationship, honestly those barely ever last), and being miserable because your only or main reason for going to that college is your significant other.

There could be different or more important aspects for different people. But this was my process for choosing a college and I had no help in doing so. The best thing to do is do most of it by yourself, that way you don't have anyone telling you where to go when this is ultimately your decision. No one can tell you where to go, not a counselor, or your parents. This is solely your decision. And if you're considering community college? It's nothing to be ashamed of, just make sure your credits will transfer if you're planning on going to a four-year after community.

Cover Image Credit: Shiann Farrell

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