Odyssey EIC Editing 101

Odyssey EIC Editing 101

Your go-to guide for editing as an Odyssey EIC.
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Here's your go-to guide for Odyssey EIC editing:

What is your Editor Dashboard?

  • “Editor Dashboard” is where you go to find the articles of all of your Creators, including yourself, for that week. Each article will be labeled according to what stage of the editing process that has been completed.

  • Each Saturday/Sunday go into your Editor Dashboard and see who has submitted (Needs Edit) from your community.
  • Keep track of who your top creators are, who submitted, and who was just onboarded as a new creator.

Editing:

  • Because the creator submitted (hopefully) before the start of the new posting cycle, you will need to go back a week in your dashboard to edit. Toggle the calendar arrow to the left one week.
  • Click on the headline of an article that ‘Needs Edit’. Once in the article, scroll down to the body of the piece. Is it a listicle? Is it a poem? Is it an article?
    • If it is a listicle:
      • Make sure there is a small intro paragraph written by the creator to introduce what the listicle is about (could be 2-3 sentences)
      • The numbered items are in Header 2. Highlight the text needed to be in Header 2, click on the Formatting button to the far left on the top of the editing box (next to HTML). Once in the formatting options, click Header 2. Do this for the remaining numbered items on the list.
      • If there are images/gifs in the listicle make sure they are centered and attributed.
    • If it is an article
      • Are there breaks in the wording? Too long of a paragraph can mean that a reader may feel too overwhelmed to reading it. Breaking it up makes it more appealing
      • Make sure that the first paragraph is packaged well. It is enticing, has an intriguing, relatable sentence, and will capture the attention of a reader.
  • Once the body of the piece is done, you will scroll down to the Headline, Sub-Headline, and Cover Photo. These are KEY to grabbing the attention of potential readers.
  • Headline
  • Make sure that each word in the Headline is capitalized. Also, if it is a listicle, then make sure that all numerical words are numbered in the headline (not written out).
    • The Subheadline is also important to grabbing the attention of the reader. It is a piece that gives a little bit of what the article is about, enough to tease the reader. Using a captivating pull-quote, funny blurb, or something of that variety is always best when including the subheadline. Sub-Headlines are always written like a sentence with the first letter of the first word capitalized and a period at the end.

  • You must think about why people share content. People generally do not read an article all the way through, they share based on the headline and the image, then will read the piece.
  • If the headline is vague — “An Open Letter To My Mom/Best Friend/Dog” — nobody will read that piece. Let’s look at the top trending articles on Odyssey when I’m writing this:
    • I'm A Woman And I'm Not With Her — NOT “An Open Letter To Hillary Clinton”
    • Why Your Grandma Is Your Biggest Blessing In Life — NOT “What My Grandma Means To Me”
    • The Coach That Killed My Passion — NOT “What It’s Like Having A Bad Coach”
    • Losing a Grandparent Changed My Life — NOT “What It’s Like Losing A Grandparent”
  • There is no ambiguity here. People will share these because they know what the articles are about and they want these messages on their Facebook or Twitter pages because they agree or strongly disagree with them. Be clear, be concise.
  • There is also an ego factor — people love sharing articles that show traits they want to embody themselves. Articles like “Why Your Grandma Is Your Biggest Blessing In Life” are viral because people want to be seen as the sort of person who loves their grandma, so they put it on their wall. Think about what your article will “say” about a person who shares it. The more people who can use an article to show off some positive trait about themselves
  • Images
    • Use Pexels, Pixabay, Wikimedia, Flickr creative commons, Unsplash, Stocksnap, Splitshire, StartupStockPhotos, or Public Domain Pictures to get ones we know we can use.
    • When choosing an image, do not use text-only images, do not use quotes on images, do not use pictures without people in them when at all possible.
    • Personal pictures are the best, if the quality is good.
    • Pictures with people in them are better than pictures without people.
    • Landscapes, sunsets, pictures of the ocean, etc., might be pretty, but they do not encourage people to click!
    • It is KEY to have each creator attribute their own photos. Google is not an attribution.
  • Tagging is a great way to gain engagement without doing much after your creator submits. Generally around 5-8 tags is optimal to be engaged with. Make sure they are a mix of specific and general things related to the article. When being searched in Odyssey and SEO they will be pulled.

  • Have your creators choose a segment for their pieces to further give the piece an identity. This can also help make the piece easily searchable and is good for SEO searching.
  • The metadata title and description are important for search engine optimization as well. Recommended is to use the same title and description as the Headline and Sub-headline.
  • The Publish & Share area is V important.

  • Always schedule it for that Monday morning (optimal times are 8-10am in your timezone). Or schedule it for the evening (4-8pm your time zone).
  • Make sure that all articles edited are scheduled to be posted on Monday’s date, and that the scheduled social media share is scheduled for Monday at the preferred time.
  • Social Media Brief
    • Should be the same concept as the subheadline. Should not say, “Check out my article!” or “Share my article." Always make sure that it is something enticing just like the headline, subheadline, and cover photo.
  • When you’re finished editing, select “Accept as EIC Edited.” The queue will automatically bring you to your next article.

***Don’t be afraid to reject a piece if these things are not completed by creators. The “Reject” button will mark the article as “Needs Revision.” Content Creators are sent an email notification on their article being rejected. As a rule of thumb, never reject an article without leaving comments for the content Creator. Beware to let the creator know the issues if not completed within 24 hours of rejecting (text/email them). And be aware when they are complete so that you may post their piece.

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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10 Ways English Majors Are Figuratively, NOT Literally, Ted Mosby

To write or to read, that is the question all English majors must face when working on homework.

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Rather you're an English major or lit major or a writing major, there are a few things that we all have in common. And if you watched "How I Met Your Mother," you probably related to Ted Mosby more than you wished to.

1. Restraining yourself for correct people's text

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It's you're not your and it irritates me to no end.

2. Not understanding the difference between an English major and an English writing or English literature major

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My friend from another school is an English major and I'm an English writing major. I still don't know what the difference is.

3. Having one grammar rule that you care a lot about

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Whether it be "your vs. you're," "affect vs. effect," or "literally vs. figuratively," there's a good chance you go crazy throughout your day.

4. Writer's block

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Especially because your grade counts on it. Although, it won't be fun when it turns into your job depending on it.

5. Having to write all genres in one class

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Even though you prefer one genre and hate the others.

I don't care for nonfiction tbh.

6. Workshops

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Not your best moments.

7. Knowing how impossible it is to have a favorite book

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It's like picking a favorite child... but worse.

8. Feeling bad when you forget grammar rules

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Are you even an English major???

9. People telling you your major is the easiest one

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I get it, but at the same time, we can have a lot of work to do. We just drown in papers, reading assignments, research projects, presentations and portfolios. I still prefer it to exams and labs.

10. Figuring out life

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Honestly, there's too many things I want to do for a career and I can't pick AND each one is under my major. It is a nice problem to have. But hey I can run away from making a choice until the time comes.

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