I'm A Pro-Life Woman And I'm Against Alabama's Abortion Ban

I'm A 20-Year-Old, Pro-Life Woman Saying 'To Hell With Alabama's Abortion Law!'

Alabama passed one of the most controversial abortion laws in the country.

432
views

I am 20-year-old woman saying "to Hell with Alabama banning abortions!" Alabama Governor Kay Ivey signed the state law that makes any case of abortion a felony.

Now, I am a huge believer in having abortion banned, but not in all cases.

For instance, I truly believe that if a woman was raped she should be able to get an abortion. That woman, who is a victim of an unlawful and sinful act should not have to be reminded of the terror of her rape for the nine months to follow to bring her rapist's child into the world.

To make a victim of rape carry that child to term and then go through the pain of childbirth is unethical.

Now, I do agree with this law when it comes to having an abortion be lawful when the mother's well-being is at stake. However, I do not see how we can live in a country where we are given so many freedoms but yet are told and forced by the government to tell us when we can or cannot abort.

In many cases, women get abortions because it's an unexpected pregnancy, but if that woman is not a victim of a crime and of the legal age to make her own decisions then I personally feel like putting that child up for adoption is the brighter alternative. Although there is an abundance of children in foster homes and put up for adoption each year, by putting that child up for adoption you are allowing that child to potentially have a better life than they would if you simply killed them before they even had the chance to come into this world. By aborting that human being, you are not simply ending that potential life, but ending the actual life of that child that could have so much potential in life.

There are numerous girls who get pregnant at a young age, but I see it as if you are in high school or college and you are able to know right from wrong and make your own decisions regarding your own life then you should have any say in what occurs with your unborn child. I have numerous friends from high school and college that are mothers at the young ages of 16-20. They say that bringing their child into the world was the best thing they have ever done. They took responsibility for their actions. Regardless of being young, they knew that getting pregnant even if not planned was the result of their actions with their partner.

Getting raped no matter what your age and being a child under 16 is when abortion should be allowed.

Being reckless and getting pregnant on accident when you are aware of your actions is when you as woman need to either take responsibility of that child that you have created or put that child up for adoption to give them the opportunity to have a great life.

When it comes to the argument saying that women should have the rights over what occurs to their body, they are absolutely right as everyone in the world should have that right. But, what about that child's father. What about the cases where the mother simply just does not what to have the child, but the father does? That father should still have the right to care for that child and have custody of that child once it is brought into this world. That unborn child was made equally between that man and woman together.

There are so many arguments that could be made about this law and many debates made. Will the law go into immediate effect, well we will have to just wait and see.

Although there are many opinions circulating around this ban, I simply just shed my own opinions and thoughts on the matter, what are yours?

Popular Right Now

I Am A College Student, And I Think Free Tuition Is Unfair To Everyone Who's Already Paid For It

Stop expecting others to pay for you.

4876
views

I attend Fordham University, a private university in the Bronx.

I commute to school because I can't afford to take out more loans than I already do.

Granted, I've received scholarships because of my grades, but they don't cover my whole tuition. I am nineteen years old and I have already amassed the debt of a 40-year-old. I work part-time and the money I make covers the bills I have to pay. I come from a middle-class family, but my dad can't afford to pay off my college loans.

I'm not complaining because I want my dad to pay my loans off for me; rather I am complaining because while my dad can't pay my loans off (which, believe me, he wants too), he's about to start paying off someone else's.

During the election, Bernie frequently advocated for free college.

Now, if he knew enough about economics he would know it simply isn't feasible. Luckily for him, he is seeing his plan enacted by Cuomo in NY. Cuomo has just announced that in NY, state public college will be free.

Before we go any further, it's important to understand what 'free' means.

Nothing is free; every single government program is paid for by the taxpayers. If you don't make enough to have to pay taxes, then something like this doesn't bother you. If you live off welfare and don't pay taxes, then something like this doesn't bother you. When someone offers someone something free, it's easy to take it, like it, and advocate for it, simply because you are not the one paying for it.

Cuomo's free college plan will cost $163,000,000 in the first year (Did that take your breath away too?). Now, in order to pay for this, NY state will increase their spending on higher education to cover these costs. Putting two and two together, if the state decides to raise their budget, they need money. If they need money they look to the taxpayers. The taxpayers are now forced to foot the bill for this program.

I think education is extremely important and useful.

However, my feelings on the importance of education does not mean that I think it should be free. Is college expensive? Yes -- but more so for private universities. Public universities like SUNY Cortland cost around $6,470 per year for in-state residents. That is still significantly less than one of my loans for one semester.

I've been told that maybe I shouldn't have picked a private university, but like I said, I believe education is important. I want to take advantage of the education this country offers, and so I am going to choose the best university I could, which is how I ended up at Fordham. I am not knocking public universities, they are fine institutions, they are just not for me.

My problems with this new legislation lie in the following: Nowhere are there any provisions that force the student receiving aid to have a part-time job.

I work part-time, my sister works part-time, and plenty of my friends work part-time. Working and going to school is stressful, but I do it because I need money. I need money to pay my loans off and buy my textbooks, among other things. The reason I need money is because my parents can't afford to pay off my loans and textbooks as well as both of my sisters'. There is absolutely no reason why every student who will be receiving aid is not forced to have a part-time job, whether it be working in the school library or waitressing.

We are setting up these young adults up for failure, allowing them to think someone else will always be there to foot their bills. It's ridiculous. What bothers me the most, though, is that my dad has to pay for this. Not only my dad, but plenty of senior citizens who don't even have kids, among everyone else.

The cost of living is only going up, yet paychecks rarely do the same. Further taxation is not a solution. The point of free college is to help young adults join the workforce and better our economy; however, people my parents' age are also needed to help better our economy. How are they supposed to do so when they can't spend their money because they are too busy paying taxes?

Free college is not free, the same way free healthcare isn't free.

There is only so much more the taxpayers can take. So to all the students about to get free college: get a part-time job, take personal responsibility, and take out a loan — just like the rest of us do. The world isn't going to coddle you much longer, so start acting like an adult.

Cover Image Credit: https://timedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2017/04/free-college-new-york-state.jpg?quality=85

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Yes, I'm A Feminist, No I Don't Hate All Men

Because if we want to promote equality, why fight that with mass hating a particular gender?

nadoty
nadoty
21
views

I'd like to consider myself a feminist.

I am all for equal opportunity, equal pay, and equal rights. I believe that women should be granted the equal opportunities that males do, be free of harassment, not be scared to exist literally just because of their gender, have reproductive rights, be taken seriously when we think something is medically wrong with us, and be treated with the same respect and dignity as men do. Just because I believe all these things, however, doesn't mean I automatically hate men.

I've seen a big increase in trends that, just for men existing, people will post about how "men ain't shit," or how men ultimately suck just because of their gender. When reflecting upon this, however, I've come to realize isn't this a step in the wrong direction?

Obviously, I can't continue on until I say this: there is, in fact, times where men can really suck. White men in positions of power abusing that, men who are rapists, men who meddle in women's reproductive rights, abusers, men who think it's okay and even funny to harass others, etc. But it all comes down to this: just because you're a man doesn't mean I automatically hate you, and I don't think others should.

Sure, as mentioned above, there are garbage humans who abuse their positions of power as men in order to get what they want. THOSE are the people I hate, not others for existing just because they are men. When in reality, there are a lot of good men who recognize their positions of power and try and make up for it by advocating for those in need of advocacy, whether they are women or even minorities. There are men who are decent human beings, whether that is being nice to others, volunteering in their community, caring for those around them, or even men who are also feminists.

I think my argument has been made pretty clear: I do not and will not hate you just because you are a man. No one gets to choose whichever gender they are, so why should I hate a group of people for just being born male? If I want to promote equality as a feminist, why should I then believe that I am better because I am female? Why should I say I believe in equal treatment between genders, yet automatically hate you because you're a man?

So yes, some men truly, "ain't shit." I believe these men, however, are not good human beings. Men aren't terrible just because they are men, and I ultimately wish that those promoting total equality would realize that we cannot strive towards equal treatment, opportunities, and pay if we continue clumping one group together under the impression of, "they're men, they're terrible."

nadoty
nadoty

Related Content

Facebook Comments