6 US Cities That Could Be Hosting The Olympics Soon

6 US Cities That Could Be Hosting The Olympics Soon

The Olympics could be headed to an Amerian city near you!
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The 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janerio is just weeks away. 2016 marks 20 years since the last Summer Olympics were held in the United States (the 1996 Atlanta Games) and 14 years since any Olympics Games has been held on American turf (the 2002 Salt Lake City Games). The Olympic Games won't be headed to the United States for at least another eight years. Asian countries have a stranglehold on the next three Olympics. South Korea will be hosting the 2018 Winter Olympics, followed by Japan hosting the 2020 Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, and China hosting the 2022 Winter Olympics. However, the Olympic Games could be headed back to the US soon after that. Boston was originally bidding to host the 2024 Summer Olympics, but resistance from residents caused the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) to choose Los Angeles, the host of the 1984 Summer Olympics, as the official applicant city for the United States. Los Angeles isn't the only American city with Olympic aspirations. The Olympic Games could be coming to a city near you. Here are American cities that could potentially host an upcoming Olympic Games.

Los Angeles, California

2024 will mark 20 years since Los Angeles hosted the 1984 Summer Games. Los Angeles is one of four finalist applicant cities biding to host the Games, and they could not be more dedicated in their effort. Los Angeles has been pouring in billions of dollars to boost their chances against the likes of Budapest, Rome, and Paris. With the 2024 Summer Olympic Games in mind, construction of the new stadium for the Los Angeles Rams is taking place for the nearly $3 billion dollar City of Champions Stadium in Inglewood, California pictured above. The stadium is scheduled to open in 2019. The Rams who were previously located in St. Louis until the 2015-16 NFL season will in the meanwhile play at the Los Angeles Memorial Stadium, one of the central venues of the 1984 Summer Olympics. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) will vote on the host city for the 2024 Summer Games on September 13, 2017 in Lima, Peru.

Lake Tahoe/Reno, Nevada


Various Lake Tahoe resorts are collaborating in an effort to make Reno a legitimate contender to host the most prestigious event in all of Winter Sports. Lake Tahoe is undeniably one of the most scenic places on the West Coast and is joining forces with the city of Reno to make a case to be the hosts of the 2026 Winter Olympic Games. The various resorts in Lake Tahoe have already spent $100 million dollars to improve facilities. In addition, the Lake Tahoe/Reno area already has Olympic experience under their belt. For the 1960 Winter Olympic Games in Squaw Valley, California, the region was utilized for various Olympic competitions.

Denver, Colorado


Denver originally won the right to host the 1976 Winter Olympic Games. However, financial and environmental concerns caused Colorado residents to vote in a referendum against having the Olympic Games in their state, and Denver withdrew from hosting the Games that were ultimately hosted by Innsbruck, Austria. Denver is looking to establish themselves as the early frontrunner to be the USOC pick to be the official American applicant city for the 2026 Winter Games. They have proven before to know the formula to a winning bid to host the Olympic Games and will be looking to redeem themselves from their 1976 Olympic heartbreak.

Lake Placid, New York


Lake Placid previously hosted the Winter Olympic Games in 1980s that provided one of the most memorable moments in American sports history when the underdog United States men's hockey team upset the powerhouse Soviet Union team before ultimately capturing the gold medal. It may seem far-fetched for a city to re-host the Olympics, but Beijing, China recently proved it was possible with their winning bid to host the 2022 Winter Olympic Games, which will be 14 short years since they hosted the Summer Olympics. Lake Placid would need to update existing facilities from the 1980 Winter Games, and likely have to construct state-of-the-art facilities suitable for the 2026 Winter Olympic Games.

Anchorage, Alaska

Following failed bids for the 1992 and 1994 Winter Olympics, Anchorage has rekindled their desires to be a potential Olympic host city. Anchorage has recently hosted various marquee winter sporting events, and feels now is its time to host the Winter Olympics. With the 2026 Winter Games in sight, a committee consisting of various individuals including Alaskan Olympians have been convening to figure out finances and logistics and has full backing and support from the Anchorage mayor. Anchorage would have to build a pleather of venues that are Olympic-caliber, but there's no denying it's weather is a perfect fit for the Winter Games.

Bozeman, Montana

Bozeman, Montana may be the biggest longshot to be selected as the official United States applicant city for the 2026 Winter Games, but the city is putting forth an enthusiastic effort to make their case. A group called the Big Sky Committee is pushing to make a Bozeman bid a reality and already has a detailed layout and backing from local officials including Brit Fontenot, the Bozeman Economic Development Director who believes hosting an Olympic Games would be great for Bozeman. They may be a longshot, but we'll have to wait and see. The IOC will announce the host of the 2026 Winter Olympics in 2019.

Cover Image Credit: mentalfloss

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8 Struggles Of Being 21 And Looking 12

The struggle is real, my friends.
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“You'll appreciate it when you're older." Do you know how many times my mom has told me this? Too many to count. Every time I complain about looking young that is the response I get. I know she's right, I will love looking young when I'm in my 40s. However, looking young is a real struggle in your 20s. Here's what we have to deal with:

1. Everyone thinks your younger sister or brother is the older one.

True story: someone actually thought my younger sister was my mom once. I've really gotten used to this but it still sucks.

2. You ALWAYS get carded.

Every. Single. Time. Since I know I look young, I never even bothered with a fake ID my first couple of years of college because I knew it would never work. If I'm being completely honest, I was nervous when I turned 21 that the bartender would think my real driver's license was a fake.

3. People look at your driver's license for an awkward amount of time.

So no one has actually thought my real driver's license is fake but that doesn't stop them from doing a double take and giving me *that look.* The look that says, “Wow, you don't look that old." And sometimes people will just flat out say that. The best part is this doesn't just happen when you're purchasing alcohol. This has happened to me at the movie theater.

SEE ALSO: 10 Things People Who Look 12 Hate Hearing

4. People will give you *that look* when they see you drinking alcohol.

You just want to turn around and scream “I'M 21, IT'S LEGAL. STOP JUDGING ME."

5. People are shocked to find out you're in college.

If I had a dollar for every time someone had a shocked expression on their face after I told them I'm a junior in college I could pay off all of my student loan debt. It's funny because when random people ask me how school is going, I pretty much assume they think I'm in high school and the shocked look on their face when I start to talk about my college classes confirms I'm right.

6. For some reason wearing your hair in a ponytail makes you look younger.

I don't understand this one but it's true. Especially if I don't have any makeup on I could honestly pass for a child.

7. Meeting an actual 12-year-old who looks older than you.

We all know one. That random 12-year-old who looks extremely mature for her age and you get angry because life isn't fair.

8. Being handed a kids' menu.

This is my personal favorite. It happens more often than it should. The best part of this is it's your turn to give someone a look. The look that says, "You've got to be kidding me".

Looking young is a real struggle and I don't think everyone realizes it. However, with all the struggles that come with looking young, we still take advantage of it. Have you ever gone to a museum or event where if you're under a certain age you get in for a discounted price? Yeah? Well, that's when I bet you wish you were us. And kids' meals are way cheaper than regular meals so there have definitely been a couple times when I've kept that kids' menu.

So, all in all, it's not the worst thing in the world but it's definitely a struggle.

Cover Image Credit: Jenna Collins

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The Anaheim Ducks Are In A World Of Pain

The Ducks have now lost 19 out of their last 21 games amidst a multitude of problems and a rebuild may be at its beginning stages after Randy Carlyle's firing from head coach.

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On December 17, 2018, the Anaheim Ducks had just defeated the Pittsburgh Penguins on the road 4-2, and sat in a playoff spot with a 19-11-5 record, good for 43 points and 2nd in the Pacific Division. Since then, the Ducks have lost 19 out of their last 21 games, going 2-15-4 during that stretch, now sitting at 21-26-9 and 51 points on February 12th, eight points out of a playoff spot in the Western Conference. After their last loss, head coach Randy Carlyle was finally axed and general manager Bob Murray stepped in as the interim coach. Many issues exist currently and for the foreseeable future in Anaheim, which could see its first sustained rebuild since the early 2000s, where the team missed the playoffs three years in a row.

One of the Ducks' bigger issues is the lack of goal scoring throughout the lineup. The leading player in goals is forward Jakob Silfverberg, with 12 in 47 games played. That's not enough for a team that is 56 games into the season. The overall points production is quite anemic too. Captain and center Ryan Getzlaf leads the club with 36 points in 50 games, and he is the only player with more than 30 points to this date.

Injuries are also factoring into the equation: center Adam Henrique and defenseman Brandon Montour are the only Ducks to have played in every game this season, with players such as forwards in Silfverberg, Getzlaf, Rickard Rakell, Corey Perry, Ryan Kesler, and Ondrej Kase as well as defensemen Cam Fowler and Hampus Lindholm, and goaltender Ryan Miller all spending at least five games on the injured reserve.

With so many players in and out of the lineup, not to mention that most of the fill-ins are inexperienced at the NHL level, it is hard to develop any sort of chemistry for an extended period of time. Goaltender John Gibson has been unable to maintain grade A performance in net, as his save percentage is now at 0.914, below where he started the season. With all of this considered, the Ducks have a tough future ahead when considering their salary cap situation.

Perry and Getzlaf, both of who will turn 34 in May, have a cap hit of $8.625 and $8.25 million for the next two years after the 2018-19 season, while Kesler, who turns 35 in August, makes $6.825 million for the next 3 years after this season concludes. Perry has only played in five games this year due to injuries, Getzlaf's production is declining and not up to par with how much he is paid, and Kesler has only six points in 48 games, and he also only played in 44 games last season due to injuries, scoring just 14 points.

These expensive contracts are untradeable unless they attach a younger asset in a trade, like prospects Sam Steel, Max Jones, Maxim Comtois, or Troy Terry. It is possible that Kesler and/or Perry will be bought out of their contracts in the offseason, meaning they will save money against the salary cap for the remainder of those contract years, but will have portions of that contract counting against the cap for a few years more.

Despite these bad contracts which currently prevent the Ducks from signing more than one big free agent, the aforementioned prospects will most likely see more substantial time in Anaheim next season, which could boost the club, but it is unlikely that any of them take the league by storm to make the Ducks a contender again. For this to happen, young forwards like Rakell, Kase, and Daniel Sprong will have to exceed expectations, while the defensive core will also need to step it up compared to their performance this, which makes them look overpaid.

As it stands, the Ducks are 4th in the 2019 NHL Draft Lottery and could see a highly touted prospect come to Anaheim next year, but the current roster and prospect core will need bounce back seasons or the management group will be forced to blow up much of the roster, which would almost guarantee missing the playoffs again.

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