6 US Cities That Could Be Hosting The Olympics Soon

6 US Cities That Could Be Hosting The Olympics Soon

The Olympics could be headed to an Amerian city near you!
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The 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janerio is just weeks away. 2016 marks 20 years since the last Summer Olympics were held in the United States (the 1996 Atlanta Games) and 14 years since any Olympics Games has been held on American turf (the 2002 Salt Lake City Games). The Olympic Games won't be headed to the United States for at least another eight years. Asian countries have a stranglehold on the next three Olympics. South Korea will be hosting the 2018 Winter Olympics, followed by Japan hosting the 2020 Summer Olympic Games in Tokyo, and China hosting the 2022 Winter Olympics. However, the Olympic Games could be headed back to the US soon after that. Boston was originally bidding to host the 2024 Summer Olympics, but resistance from residents caused the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) to choose Los Angeles, the host of the 1984 Summer Olympics, as the official applicant city for the United States. Los Angeles isn't the only American city with Olympic aspirations. The Olympic Games could be coming to a city near you. Here are American cities that could potentially host an upcoming Olympic Games.

Los Angeles, California

2024 will mark 20 years since Los Angeles hosted the 1984 Summer Games. Los Angeles is one of four finalist applicant cities biding to host the Games, and they could not be more dedicated in their effort. Los Angeles has been pouring in billions of dollars to boost their chances against the likes of Budapest, Rome, and Paris. With the 2024 Summer Olympic Games in mind, construction of the new stadium for the Los Angeles Rams is taking place for the nearly $3 billion dollar City of Champions Stadium in Inglewood, California pictured above. The stadium is scheduled to open in 2019. The Rams who were previously located in St. Louis until the 2015-16 NFL season will in the meanwhile play at the Los Angeles Memorial Stadium, one of the central venues of the 1984 Summer Olympics. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) will vote on the host city for the 2024 Summer Games on September 13, 2017 in Lima, Peru.

Lake Tahoe/Reno, Nevada


Various Lake Tahoe resorts are collaborating in an effort to make Reno a legitimate contender to host the most prestigious event in all of Winter Sports. Lake Tahoe is undeniably one of the most scenic places on the West Coast and is joining forces with the city of Reno to make a case to be the hosts of the 2026 Winter Olympic Games. The various resorts in Lake Tahoe have already spent $100 million dollars to improve facilities. In addition, the Lake Tahoe/Reno area already has Olympic experience under their belt. For the 1960 Winter Olympic Games in Squaw Valley, California, the region was utilized for various Olympic competitions.

Denver, Colorado


Denver originally won the right to host the 1976 Winter Olympic Games. However, financial and environmental concerns caused Colorado residents to vote in a referendum against having the Olympic Games in their state, and Denver withdrew from hosting the Games that were ultimately hosted by Innsbruck, Austria. Denver is looking to establish themselves as the early frontrunner to be the USOC pick to be the official American applicant city for the 2026 Winter Games. They have proven before to know the formula to a winning bid to host the Olympic Games and will be looking to redeem themselves from their 1976 Olympic heartbreak.

Lake Placid, New York


Lake Placid previously hosted the Winter Olympic Games in 1980s that provided one of the most memorable moments in American sports history when the underdog United States men's hockey team upset the powerhouse Soviet Union team before ultimately capturing the gold medal. It may seem far-fetched for a city to re-host the Olympics, but Beijing, China recently proved it was possible with their winning bid to host the 2022 Winter Olympic Games, which will be 14 short years since they hosted the Summer Olympics. Lake Placid would need to update existing facilities from the 1980 Winter Games, and likely have to construct state-of-the-art facilities suitable for the 2026 Winter Olympic Games.

Anchorage, Alaska

Following failed bids for the 1992 and 1994 Winter Olympics, Anchorage has rekindled their desires to be a potential Olympic host city. Anchorage has recently hosted various marquee winter sporting events, and feels now is its time to host the Winter Olympics. With the 2026 Winter Games in sight, a committee consisting of various individuals including Alaskan Olympians have been convening to figure out finances and logistics and has full backing and support from the Anchorage mayor. Anchorage would have to build a pleather of venues that are Olympic-caliber, but there's no denying it's weather is a perfect fit for the Winter Games.

Bozeman, Montana

Bozeman, Montana may be the biggest longshot to be selected as the official United States applicant city for the 2026 Winter Games, but the city is putting forth an enthusiastic effort to make their case. A group called the Big Sky Committee is pushing to make a Bozeman bid a reality and already has a detailed layout and backing from local officials including Brit Fontenot, the Bozeman Economic Development Director who believes hosting an Olympic Games would be great for Bozeman. They may be a longshot, but we'll have to wait and see. The IOC will announce the host of the 2026 Winter Olympics in 2019.

Cover Image Credit: mentalfloss

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7 Lies From F*ckboys That We've All Fallen For At Least Once

They might've had you goin' for a hot second, but you know better now.
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There’s no use in even frontin’; we’ve all been there. You know he’s a f*ckboy from the beginning, but you’re interested in pursuing him anyway. Ain't no thang; I fully support you.

You tell yourself you won’t fall for his games or lies because you’ve been through it all so many times before. Yet, time and time again, you find yourself slippin’ for a hot second, wanting to give him the benefit of the doubt until he inevitably disappoints you. Here are the top seven lies you’ve heard from f*ckboys that get you heated every time.

1. You’re the only girl I’m talking to/sleeping with


HAHAHA. OK, first, I don't actually care what (or who) you're doing in your spare time because you're definitely not the only guy I'm seeing either. I'm just asking so I know you're clean, OK? I don't need more stress in my life.

2. I know how to treat girls right

Isn't it super ironic how the WORST f*ckboys are the ones to toss this line?

3. I’ll text you

This statement is so unbelievable that on the off chance that they do actually text you, you basically fall out of your chair in shock.

4. I’m gonna give it to you good

I cry/cringe/die of laughter every time I hear this one because it's always the mediocre ones that throw this line. None of my most memorable hookups have ever said this because their actions clearly speak for them. Mediocre boys, TAKE NOTE.

5. Damn, I wanted to see you though

Well, you were supposed to, but then you clearly had other plans in mind. So the desire wasn’t all that intense, obviously.

6. Yeah, she and I broke up

CLASSIC LIE. CLASSIC. Sure, I believed it the first couple of times, but don’t even try that sh*t with me after I see she’s still blowin’ up your line.

7. *No response for hours after making plans* Damn, sorry I fell asleep


Honestly, how many times are you gonna throw that line when you’re literally viewable on Snap Map. BOY, I see you at someone else’s house. Stop frontin’, there’s no point.


Again, don't ask me why we put up with this sh*t because the mystery remains. I guess in our own sick, twisted ways, we crave the dramatics and thrills that come from their f*ckery. Whatever the reason, though, at least we've got some ~fun~ stories to tell.

Cover Image Credit: YouTube | I'm Shmacked

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From Practices To Performances, Dance Teams Take Over Stony Brook University

I found a community of people who finally shared my interests that I hid for years. It's great to finally have a crew who all cares about the same thing.

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While many students at Stony Brook University like to go home or to the library on late nights, dance teams take over academic buildings around campus to practice for performances.

Practicing in places like Earth and Space Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences and Center for Leadership and Service, groups like KBS, CDT and PUSO Modern practice two or three times a week to prepare for events like Seawolves Showcase and Asian Night and for competitions like the Prelude Dance Competition.

The KBS Dance Team, a group that focuses on dancing to K-Pop and K-Hip-Hop, has performed at events on campus like CASB Cultural Carnival and Asian Night. The team even has a subgroup of some members of the team who have extra practices and experiment with different styles of music and dance.

Nicole Lombino, a KBS manager said, "I found a community of people who finally shared my interests that I hid for years. It's great to finally have a crew who all cares about the same thing."

This semester, KBS had practices twice a week and practiced for about two hours at each practice. The director and the two managers lead practice which includes presenting choreography, learning new dances, creating dance formations and cleaning members' movements to look as neat as possible before performances.

"KBS isn't a competitive team so you're not pressured to compete with anyone or beat someone else at something," Tina Ng, the current director of KBS and a member of CDT said, "You're just doing it for fun."

Many members on the team are freshmen and have never danced before being on KBS.

"Even in this one semester, I've seen them grow as dancers," Lombino said, "From the first to second performance, it's staggering how much they've improved."

Dancing on a team at Stony Brook University is more than just a club, it's a commitment. And members on the executive board of dance teams have to organize performances, make sure practices run smoothly, and serve as mentors for their teammates.

"I'm responsible for this team and my eboard and I have to share the weight and any difficulties," Iris Au, a KBS manager said. "I have to actively participate and contribute to the team, which is different from when I was just a team member."

The breakdancing club on campus, the Stony Brook Breakers, have open practices and have members that help people learn breakdancing, regardless of skill. They practice in the Health Sciences Tower and the university's Recreation Center.

Breakdancing moves like windmills, headspins and baby spins are moves that the Breakers have had to work hard to learn and are still difficult for members.

While many dance teams hold auditions to be in the group, a couple of teams hold dance workshops where anyone can attend to learn short pieces, usually between 30 seconds and one minute.

Adam Sotero, a member of the dance team Deja Vu, helped organize a workshop featuring guest teachers from PUSO Modern, Cadence Step Team and Heartbreak Crew.

"The purpose of the workshop was to engage more in the dance community and showcase everyone's different styles," Sotero said. "My favorite part about these events is engaging with other members of the dance community, whether they are old or new friends."

Apart from members of Deja Vu, over 50 people attended the workshop that was held in SAC Ballroom A. The attendees learned two hip-hop pieces and one step dancing piece.

CDT also held three workshop days two weeks ago, featuring teachers from CDT, KBS, and Outburst Dance Company. The workshops focused on K-Pop, hip-hop and urban dance.

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