Why I am Progressive

Why I am Progressive

Politics are my core
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I want to start off with a quote from Lisa Simpson:

"Okay I am a liberal and sometimes that is a dirty word, but what liberal really means is those who have more than enough sharing with those who don't, and those principals have been in place during this countries most prosperous times. So, if that is a liberal then I am a liberal."

I feel like this statement is a good foundation for what I am going to talk about. (she says liberal but in this instance, it works for progressive too.) I am progressive not because it is "hip or cool trend or because of the liberal media". I'm progressive because when I looked at the people around me and the things that were going down I didn't like it. I saw people who were conservative spewing out dirty hateful rhetoric and people talking about an America I don't believe in. When there were multiple Republicans who talked about deporting undocumented immigrants, "for the good of the country" but the majority of the states that they reside don't care if they live there or not. Also, giving tax breaks to the wealthy elite of this country while millions of Americans are still on welfare. Then when we speak up or take a knee because a community of hard-working Americans is getting pushed around we are disrespecting our country. Oh but I guess it's not disrespectful when our police brutality attacks the African-Americans of this country or when our president wants to focus more on starting a war with the NFL then helping the victims of natural disasters. You can say what you want about Obama but he did not disrespect the conservatives the way Trump is disrespecting the liberals of our country. Also, this president has stirred up more white supremacist groups than any president in at least the last 50+ years. I know some of Trump's rhetoric and speech doesn't reflect all Republicans but still, I can't stand for a country that is under leadership that wants to push down the very people that make this country great. I am progressive because it is right, I spent my whole life with Aspergers having to fight to be heard and understood and that's what I want for my fellow Americans to be heard and understood. Not to be pigeon held and suffocated by oppression but to be unbound by the chains of oppression, not to be banned from our country based on religion or not serve in our military because of gender identity or be kicked out of the NFL just because you are standing up for your people but to live the American dream. I maybe was born with Aspergers but I am still a white straight Christian male and have a lot to learn and understand from my fellow Americans who aren't. #lovetrumpshate

Cover Image Credit: pexelbay.com

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Your Wait time At Theme Parks Is Not Unfair, You're Just Impatient

Your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself.

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Toy Story Land at Disney's Hollywood Studios "unboxed" on June 30, 2018. My friend and I decided to brave the crowds on opening day. We got to the park around 7 AM only to find out that the park opened around 6 AM. Upon some more scrolling through multiple Disney Annual Passholder Facebook groups, we discovered that people were waiting outside the park as early as 1 AM.

We knew we'd be waiting in line for the bulk of the Toy Story Land unboxing day. There were four main lines in the new land: the line to enter the land; the line for Slinky Dog Dash, the new roller coaster; the line for Alien Spinning Saucers, the easier of the new rides in the land; Toy Story Mania, the (now old news) arcade-type ride; and the new quick-service restaurant, Woody's Lunchbox (complete with grilled cheese and "grown-up drinks").

Because we were so early, we did not have to wait in line to get into the land. We decided to ride Alien Spinning Saucers first. The posted wait time was 150 minutes, but my friend timed the line and we only waited for 50 minutes. Next, we tried to find the line for Slinky Dog Dash. After receiving conflicting answers, the runaround, and even an, "I don't know, good luck," from multiple Cast Members, we exited the land to find the beginning of the Slinky line. We were then told that there was only one line to enter the park that eventually broke off into the Slinky line. We were not about to wait to get back into the area we just left, so we got a Fastpass for Toy Story Mania that we didn't plan on using in order to be let into the land sooner. We still had to wait for our time, so we decided to get the exclusive Little Green Man alien popcorn bin—this took an entire hour. We then used our Fastpass to enter the land, found the Slinky line, and proceeded to wait for two and a half hours only for the ride to shut down due to rain. But we've come this far and rain was not about to stop us. We waited an hour, still in line and under a covered area, for the rain to stop. Then, we waited another hour and a half to get on the ride from there once it reopened (mainly because they prioritized people who missed their Fastpass time due to the rain). After that, we used the mobile order feature on the My Disney Experience app to skip part of the line at Woody's Lunchbox.

Did you know that there is actually a psychological science to waiting? In the hospitality industry, this science is the difference between "perceived wait" and "actual wait." A perceived wait is how long you feel like you are waiting, while the actual wait is, of course, the real and factual time you wait. There are eight things that affect the perceived wait time: unoccupied time feels longer than occupied time, pre-process waits feel longer than in-process waits, anxiety makes waits feel longer, uncertain waits are longer than certain waits, unexplained waits are longer than explained waits, unfair waits are longer than equitable waits, people will wait longer for more valuable service and solo waiting feels longer than group waiting.

Our perceived wait time for Alien Spinning Saucers was short because we expected it to be longer. Our wait for the popcorn seemed longer because it was unoccupied and unexplained. Our wait for the rain to stop so the ride could reopen seemed shorter because it was explained. Our wait between the ride reopening and getting on the coaster seemed longer because it felt unfair for Disney to let so many Fastpass holders through while more people waited through the rain. Our entire wait for Slinky Dog Dash seemed longer because we were not told the wait time in the beginning. Our wait for our food after placing a mobile order seemed shorter because it was an in-process wait. We also didn't mind wait long wait times for any of these experiences because they were new and we placed more value on them than other rides or restaurants at Disney. The people who arrived at 1 AM just added five hours to their perceived wait

Some non-theme park examples of this science of waiting in the hospitality industry would be waiting at a restaurant, movie theater, hotel, performance or even grocery store. When I went to see "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom," the power went out in the theater right as we arrived. Not only did we have to wait for it to come back and for them to reset the projectors, I had to wait in a bit of anxiety because the power outage spooked me. It was only a 30-minute wait but felt so much longer. At the quick-service restaurant where I work, we track the time from when the guest places their order to the time they receive their food. Guests in the drive-thru will complain about 10 or more minute waits, when our screens tell us they have only been waiting four or five minutes. Their actual wait was the four or five minutes that we track because this is when they first request our service, but their perceived wait begins the moment they pull into the parking lot and join the line because this is when they begin interacting with our business. While in line, they are experiencing pre-process wait times; after placing the order, they experience in-process wait times.

Establishments in the hospitality industry do what they can to cut down on guests' wait times. For example, theme parks offer services like Disney's Fastpass or Universal's Express pass in order to cut down the time waiting in lines so guests have more time to buy food and merchandise. Stores like Target or Wal-Mart offer self-checkout to give guests that in-process wait time. Movie theaters allow you to check in and get tickets on a mobile app and some quick-service restaurants let you place mobile or online orders. So why do people still get so bent out of shape about being forced to wait?

On Toy Story Land unboxing day, I witnessed a woman make a small scene about being forced to wait to exit the new land. Cast Members were regulating the flow of traffic in and out of the land due to the large crowd and the line that was in place to enter the land. Those exiting the land needed to wait while those entering moved forward from the line. Looking from the outside of the situation as I was, this all makes sense. However, the woman I saw may have felt that her wait was unfair or unexplained. She switched between her hands on her hips and her arms crossed, communicated with her body language that she was not happy. Her face was in a nasty scowl at those entering the land and the Cast Members in the area. She kept shaking her head at those in her group and when allowed to proceed out of the land, I could tell she was making snide comments about the wait.

At work, we sometimes run a double drive-thru in which team members with iPads will take orders outside and a sequencer will direct cars so that they stay in the correct order moving toward the window. In my experience as the sequencer, I will inform the drivers which car to follow, they will acknowledge me and then still proceed to dart in front of other cars just so they make it to the window maybe a whole minute sooner. Not only is this rude, but it puts this car and the cars around them at risk of receiving the wrong food because they are now out of order. We catch these instances more often than not, but it still adds stress and makes the other guests upset. Perhaps these guests feel like their wait is also unfair or unexplained, but if they look at the situation from the outside or from the restaurant's perspective, they would understand why they need to follow the blue Toyota.

The truth of the matter is that your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself. We all want instant gratification, I get it. But in reality, we have to wait for some things. It takes time to prepare a meal. It takes time to experience a ride at a theme park that everyone else wants to go on. It takes time to ring up groceries. It takes patience to live in this world.

So next time you find yourself waiting, take a minute to remember the difference between perceived and actual wait times. Think about the eight aspects of waiting that affect your perceived wait. Do what you can to realize why you are waiting or keep yourself occupied in this wait. Don't be impatient. That's no way to live your life.

Cover Image Credit:

Aranxa Esteve

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You Might Say You're 'Pro-Life' But All I Hear Is 'Anti-Women's Rights'

Denying a woman the right to choose what happens to her body is anti-women's rights.

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I recently stumbled across an article whose title intrigued me: "Just because I'm Pro-Life Doesn't Mean I'm Anti-Women's Rights, You Can Be Both." My idea of pro-life has always been something rather simple—the denial of a woman's right to choose. While pro-choice isn't exactly anti-life, pro-life is the exact same as anti-choice.

Wanting someone to have a fresh opinion on this whole abortion debate, I clicked the article. I can get behind the introduction; the author is definitely for equality with most aspects of a woman's life. When I got to the third paragraph though, I was disappointed. Just like a lot of pro-life people, she compared abortion to murdering a child.

To make things even worse in my mind, she cited that the "baby" has separate DNA from conception. This is partially true. Sure, the sex cells that meet together have the same DNA that the child will have if it makes it to birth, but that isn't a baby yet. It's a zygote. It's something the mother may not even be aware of yet, and it's something that could be completely unwanted.

It could also be completed wanted, planned and loved, but end up threatening the mother's life. I'll talk about the fun grey area of unwanted but necessary abortions after I talk about the next citation.

She leaves a link for us to follow if we want more information about life starting at conception, but guess when the most recent study was done—1997! The last study that claimed life began at conception was over two decades ago. As a scientific mind, I want something that's less than a decade old. In fact, that's what I was taught to look for.

The more recent, the better.

But that isn't the point of this article. I'm not writing about this person to bash her out-of-date sources; I'm writing to say that you can't be pro-life and pro-women's choice.

Remember what I mentioned a few paragraphs ago? How a zygote could be completely wanted and loved, but end up putting the mother's life at risk? Which is more important: the mother or the not-yet-born-may-still-die-child? Not every woman that seeks an abortion wants to "kill her child."

Sure, she covers her ass by mentioning a "normal pregnancy" very fleetingly, but people calling women baby-killers outside of Planned Parenthood aren't going to know who is there out of choice and who is there out of need.

Here's some food for thought: What if a rape victim has a perfectly normal pregnancy that could be carried to term?

Another scenario: What if the parent(s) wouldn't have the ability or even want to care for an unwanted child?

I'm not anti-life, and I don't support killing babies.

However, if I had a friend who needed an abortion because she was raped? If she had no ability to care for herself, let alone a child? If she made a big mistake and couldn't stand the life that she and her child would have to lead? I wouldn't call her a murderer. I wouldn't tell her she killed her child out of her own selfishness.

I would be there to comfort her, to console her, to make sure she knew the world didn't hate her, just like I would hope someone would do for me if I was in that position.

If your stance is that a woman should be forced to carry a child she doesn't want, then your stance is anti-women's rights.

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