On a large campus, the cold walk from class to class can be daunting. You are sick of the three songs you've been playing on repeat, and you are sick of watching people fly by on electric skateboards with envy. Here's the solution — wrap your scarf around your neck, chin, and nose then pop in your air pods (or headphones if you are a peasant like me) and turn on one of these podcasts. They are all available on Spotify or Apple Podcasts.

1. Myths and Legends podcast 

Host Jason retells interesting myths, the (often bizarre) original versions of fairy tales, and creatures of folklore. The stories are fascinating, and the host adds humorous commentary that will make you smile on your arduous commute to your 8 AM.

2. Stuff to Blow Your Mind

This podcast features two hosts Robert Lamb and Joe McCormick discussing and deconstructing “neurological quandaries, cosmic mysteries, evolutionary marvels and the technological underpinnings of our transhuman future.” In other words, awesome science stuff that is not covered in that Chemistry class that makes you cry every night.

3. Stuff You Missed in History Class 

This podcast is cohosted by Tracy V. Wilson and Holly Frey, and runs along the same lines as the previous podcast listed. The two go over interesting characters, events, and objects of the past such as the women of Disney and the (condensed) history of air conditioning. I bet that wasn’t covered in your U.S. History Class.

4. Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History 

Another history podcast, this one takes a much more in-depth approach to historical events than the last one listed. Like 5 hours in length depth, which also means you probably only need to listen to one episode for the rest of the semester. Host Dan Carlin dives deep with multiple sources, perspectives, and interpretations that will make you skip your history class that has been rendered elementary in comparison.

5. Lend Me Your Ears: A Podcast About Shakespeare and Politics 

This podcast’s title pretty much sums it up — host Isaac Butler interviews historians and experts to contextualize Shakespeare’s plays and how we can view our present politics through them, and features readings of the plays. There’s nothing like listening to Lord Gloucester’s eyes being gouged out on your way to a Calculus exam.