CBD oil benefits

CBD Oil Is Still Relatively New, So Proceed With Caution Before Using It

Here are a few things to know about CBD oil before you decide to use it.

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CBD was legalized in June 2018. It is known to relieve anxiety, pain, and several other conditions in users. CBD has been seen everywhere lately — in skin care, coffee, and even pet treats.

Dr. Scott Gottlieb put in a statement on June 25:

"Today, the FDA approved a purified form of the drug cannabidiol (CBD). This is one of more than 80 active chemicals in marijuana. The new product was approved to treat seizures associated with two rare, severe forms of epilepsy in patients two years of age and older."

It's no surprise that on March 27th companies, such as CVS Pharmacy, started making plans to sell it in their stores.

But, before you buy and decide to use it, here are a few things you should know.

What is CDB?

CBD stands for Cannabidiol and comes from the hemp plant, a relative of marijuana and a member of the cannabis family. However, it does not contain the chemical THC, which is the part of marijuana that makes it psychoactive. In other words, CBD doesn't cause a high when it is used.

CDB oil first came around as a way to treat seizures of both Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), which typically don't respond to anti-seizure medications. In some cases, CBD did not just reduce seizures but stopped the seizures altogether. That's why the FDA approved a new drug, Epidiolex, last December.

CBD oil research currently indicates that it has many benefits, but it's still essential to approach it with an open, yet realistic, mindset.

Those who have used it say that there are numerous benefits of CBD oil. Some of these include a reduction in anxiety, depression, PTSD, MS, and inflammation as just some of the benefits to humans and their health. However, many professionals say more research needs to be done.

CBD can be taken in many different forms and there are several kinds to choose from, so make sure to do research on the type you're getting and where it comes from.

Here are some dosages based on the research that has been done so far.

  • Cancer patient/loss of appetite: 2.5 mg THC (oral), with or without 1 mg CBD for six weeks.
  • Prolonged pain: 2.5-20 mg of CBD [with or without THC] (orally).
  • Schizophrenia: 40 to 1280 mg of CBD per day.
  • Sleeping disorders: 40 mg to 160 mg of CBD (orally).
  • Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Extracts of cannabis plants containing 2.5 to 120 mg of a combination of THC / CBD daily for 2-15 weeks. Patients typically use eight sprays in three hours, with a maximum of 48 sprays per 24-hour period.

Other factors may be included in determining the exact amount a specific person many need. As always consult with a healthcare professional before regularly taking any type of medication, whether it's natural or otherwise.

It is attainable legally, in most states, and has recently been allowed to be sold in drugstores in several states - including Kentucky, Alabama, Colorado, Indiana, Maryland, Illinois, Tennessee, and California.

Of course, there's still more research that needs to be done. But many believe that it could be beneficial despite the limited research.

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An Open Letter To The Parent That Chose Drugs Over Me

You should know this.
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There used to be a time when you made me feel loved and wanted.

I couldn't wait to come home after school knowing that you'd be waiting for me along with all of my favorite snacks, ready to give me a big hug and ask me how my day went. I used to sit in your lap while you helped me read my chapter books. You used to show up to things.

You used to get to know my friends. You used to encourage me. But you're not that person anymore. I watched as your addiction consumed you and turned you into a monster. Your loving words turned into hateful actions. I watched as you became angry at the world until your substances were the only thing that mattered anymore. Nothing was good enough for you, and nothing could save you... not even me.

SEE ALSO: They're Not Junkies, You're Just Uneducated

It took me a long time to realize what was even going on. I was old enough to know that drugs were bad, but still young enough that I had no idea what they looked like or how a person may act while taking them. I didn't know that when you locked yourself in your room with strangers you were getting high, or that it wasn't normal for people to sleep for twenty hours at a time.

I used to think that maybe if I had asked other adults more questions I would have figured it out sooner and you could have gotten help. I used to think that if maybe my sister and I didn't fight as much, or if I didn't complain every time you told me to do something, that maybe you wouldn't have been so stressed out all the time. But the truth is, it wasn't my fault. It wasn't my sister's fault.

This was all on you.

I didn't ask for a parent that was forced to enroll in various rehab programs, but that's what I got. I didn't ask for the letters you sent while you were in and out of jail, but I still read them all. I didn't want to explain to my friends' parents why your name was always in the paper, but I did it regardless.

All I ever actually wanted was for you to pick me for once in your life, but you couldn't do that.

When the going got tough, you just cowered away, too scared to confront your own demons. You had everyone else to blame, but you never took a second to think about what you were doing to us, no matter how much I begged and pleaded.

You ripped our family apart. You fucked me up.

What is a child to do when the one person in the whole world that is supposed to teach them love and affection hits them, tells them they're worthless, and leaves them to fend for themselves?

SEE ALSO: To The Children Growing Up Around Addiction

I promised myself several years ago that I would never become you. I would never let any kind of substance consume my life. I wouldn't lie, steal, and manipulate to get my way. I wouldn't become a “parent" to my children only when it's convenient for me. I would make something of myself.

It makes my blood boil to see you take credit for how I turned out. “I'm so proud of my baby. Raising you is the greatest thing I've ever done." Complete bullshit. You were never around to raise me. Any ounce of success I've tasted hasn't come from you or your guidance. If anything, you've only been a living demonstration of everything I shouldn't be.

I got to where I am today with absolutely no help from you. You don't get to come into my life now that I'm an adult and take all the credit. You don't get to try to dictate what I can and can't do as if you have some kind of authority on my decisions. You had your chance to raise me and be a part of my life, but you blew it. I don't owe you a single thing.


Cover Image Credit: Jordi Bernabeu

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Stop Demonizing CBD Just Because You Associate It With THC

CBD doesn't get you high, do your research.

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I'm sure you've heard about CBD already, but if not, then let me break it down for you. Cannabidiol, CBD, is one of the hundreds of cannabinoids identified in the cannabis plant, but unlike the THC in the marijuana plant, it doesn't have any psychoactive properties.

CBD doesn't get you high.

When extracted from the plant, CBD has proven to be effective in the medical field. It has shown to be effective in the treatment of epilepsy, in the management of pain, in reducing depression and anxiety, and relieving cancer symptoms, among a host of other uses. New research from Mount Sinai Hospital in New York has revealed that CBD may be beneficial for society as a whole, too.

Researchers at Mount Sinai Hospital conducted the study to understand how we can fight the opioid epidemic through the discovery of alternative treatment options by assessing the potential effects of CBD on craving and anxiety in heroin users.

42 drug abstinent men and women between the ages of 21 and 65, who had recently stopped using heroin, were recruited for the study. Two groups were formed out of the participants: a control group that received a placebo and a test group that received CBD doses ranging from 400 mg to 800 mg per day. After administration, participants were exposed to neutral environmental cues and cues that would be considered drug-use inducing over three sessions. The cues in the environment were tested because an addict's environment and the cues it gives are the strongest triggers for relapse and continued drug use.

The results of the research hold great promise for the future of CBD.

Participants who were in the test group and given CBD had significantly reduced cravings for heroin, and noted feeling less anxiety when exposed to drug-use inducing cues. Moreover, the CBD had a lasting effect on this group as it continued to reduce cravings and relieve anxiety for seven days after the last dose was administered. In essence, this is the most important takeaway from the research: CBD had lasting effects well after it was present in the body. Numerous vital signs like heart rate, skin temperature, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were taken to ensure only objective results were obtained since cravings and anxiety are subjective feelings. Another finding was a reduction in participants' heart rate and salivary cortisol levels, which would have both increased in the presence of anxiety-provoking images.

I think the evidence points to a logical conclusion: CBD is safe, it is effective in treating opioid addictions, and it is beneficial for those who experience a host of issues from pain, to anxiety, to epilepsy or to illnesses. Now is the time to keep pushing for legalization to continue larger scale studies and introduce CBD as a valid treatment option.

"A successful non-opioid medication would add significantly to the existing addiction medication toolbox to help reduce the growing death toll and enormous health care costs." - Yasmin Hurd, director of the Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York.

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