Boys Are Protesting Sexism With Off-The-Shoulder Tops

Boys Are Protesting Sexism With Off-The-Shoulder Tops

Bare shoulders, bare truths.
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Whether it’s a plaid uniform or a ban on open-toed shoes, dress codes have always existed to ensure some abstractly defined “order” amongst students. Making sleeveless tops impermissible is not unpopular, albeit arguably most questionable. The controversy over shoulders is age-old; how did this particular body part become so taboo?

Researching the question in any phrasing proves futile. While complaints against shoulders being a “distraction” occur in the thousands, explanations as to why are sparse, if there at all. There are religious reasons that I have no right to contest, but those aside, most attest to what they know to be fact: sexism is manifested in dress codes.

From senators being banned from wearing sleeveless tops to female tennis players being banned from wearing leggings, the implications are endless. Recently revealed regulations at San Benito High School in Hollister, California seemingly add to the list. On their first day, dozens of girls wore off-the-shoulder tops, and at least 50 of them were sent to the office for doing so. Students were further banned from exposing their shoulders in photos on picture day. The restriction came as a surprise; according to students, the dress code had never been so harshly enforced before. Male students arriving in their own off-the-shoulder tops to protest were an unexpected, but more-than-appropriate response.

One student, Andrei Vladimirov, commented “Not being able to wear a certain type of shirt may seem like a minor problem to some people, but it is representative of something much larger in society — the fact that women are still, today, being subjected to the dominance of male ideology.”

While the boys are hailed for showing solidarity so openly and with such adamance, Andrei clarifies that “A lot of people want to emphasize the male students' part in this protest, which I respect, but the purpose of this whole thing was to protest sexism against female students."

Unsurprisingly, administration has denied claims of the outfit regulations arising from sexism. Principal Adrian Ramirez claims “Students are saying that they were hearing that the reason [strapless and off-the-shoulder shirts] are not allowed is that it distracted the boys and that’s definitely not it at all. And they felt offended by that, and I completely agree that, if that was our stance, I would be offended too. Part of my job is to clarify the why behind the dress code. Whether you are a male or female student, it’s your own responsibility not to be distracted, regardless of your gender.”

In defense of the dress codes, Ramirez further explained “Our first goal is to prevent the possibility of any student from being a victim of any incident where they could intentionally or unintentionally be humiliated. These are clearly rare incidents, and our goal is to ensure every student is responsible to conduct themselves appropriately...Our second goal is to ensure we set expectations within our dress code that begin to prepare our students to seek and maintain employment, interview for a scholarship or pursue their career goals after high school.”

His refrain from detailing the “humiliating” incidents that he thinks students are subject to allude to the very sexism he denies. How does clothing affect how responsibly students conduct themselves? Moreover, as stated, colleges generally do not enforce dress codes, and students still maintain the ability to attain employment, receive scholarships, and pursue their career goals.

Vladimirov puts it best: “Women deserve to be treated with the utmost respect, and this entails being able to dress as one pleases. Women should be able to wear what they want without being systemically objectified — treated as if they have no personal sovereignty."

Rights to respect should not lie in our shoulders.

Cover Image Credit: J / Twitter

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The First Time I Learned About The Holocaust

When I asked my dad, "Besides Satan, who is the most evil person in the world?", he replied, "Adolf Hitler."
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This year I learned "holocaust" used to be a general term. Nowadays, when we hear this term, we automatically think of the Jewish Holocaust during World War II. People tend to disassociate themselves from the history of the Holocaust, especially the younger generations, because most of them don't have any personal ties to it. As a result, the history of the Holocaust turns into something you learn once at the appropriate age and then cast aside forever.

Although I am a person who has very little Jewish ancestry and no personal ties whatsoever to the Jewish Holocaust, I did not cast this dreadful moment in history aside. I actually listened to what my teachers told us about it and showed a willingness to understand why it should never, ever be repeated. Granted, I was going through weird phases in middle school when I learned about the Holocaust for the first time, so I didn't fully appreciate every detail. However, once I understood everything about it, historical curiosity took over. As I matured and explored my passions in World War II history, I became more empathetic and motivated to understand why the Holocaust happened. Here, in this article, I will share my initial behavior, actions, and feelings when the history of the Holocaust was introduced to me for the first time.

If I'm not mistaken, most American students learn about the Jewish Holocaust in middle school. First, you have a general history lesson; then you might read a novel about somebody's experience in the Holocaust, before watching a movie like "Schindler's List" and perhaps going to a nearby Holocaust museum. I had a very similar situation at my middle school. But, until eighth grade rolled around, the Holocaust was completely absent from my mind.

In eighth grade, my other classmates and I were fully exposed to the horrors of the Holocaust. Naturally, we received a general history lesson first. Then we read Ellie Wiesel's famous book, "Night", before watching a documentary about him returning to Poland with Oprah Winfrey and recalling the horrible memories at Auschwitz. Then we read a short story about Anne Frank's experience. Towards the end of our big Holocaust unit, half of my classmates went to the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Skokie, Illinois, while me and the rest of my classmates stayed behind for a shortened school day to watch a movie about the Holocaust.

While other students might have watched "Schindler's List", my class watched "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas". Although it was lighter than "Schindler's List", it was still equally effective. The ending stabbed me in the heart: I had learned about Zyklon B gas, but never knew how horrifying it was until I watched this movie. I remained mentally disturbed and unusually quiet for the rest of the day. When I finally got home, I broke down. My sister walked in the door and found me crying at the kitchen table. She asked me what was wrong. Before I shared my entire school day, I shouted angrily, "I HATE NAZIS!"

When my half of the class was going to the Holocaust Memorial Museum the next day, I was quite reluctant. I was still upset about the movie I was forced to watch. But, being a good student, I attempted to look as positive as possible. While the rest of my mature classmates only thought of going to the museum as a day off from a regular school day, curiosity was still buried deep inside my heart. When we finally toured through the museum, I was both shocked, horrified, and forever changed. My classmates had yawned throughout the tour and talked to their friends instead, but I eagerly listened to the stories from our tour guide and discovered I had a thirst for historical knowledge. Instead of complaining about wanting to go home, like my friends acted, I expressed a strong interest in learning more.

Since eighth grade, my passion for understanding the Second World War and the Jewish Holocaust remained strong and present. Learning about the Holocaust became a milestone in my historical explorations. It made more appreciative of what I have and more grateful for the fortunate lifestyle I was gifted with. And, of course, it also sparked a craving for historical knowledge. Learning from the horrors of Holocaust is an experience I can't trade for any other. I can only hope that there are others out there who will be able to appreciate history and learn vital lessons from it and perhaps pursue it professionally someday.

Cover Image Credit: Historyplex

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8 Types Of Frat Guys You're Bound To Interact With During A Friday Night Out

I've done all the research so that you don't have to.
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College is like a zoo.

But instead of exotic animals, there are young adults, and everyone is wasted.

Deciding how to spend your free time in college requires a lot of research. There are hundreds of clubs, teams, and organizations to join! Some of these extracurriculars can excel your career, allowing you to network and build connections for the future. Others may introduce you to friends you'll have for life -- think weddings, the birthdays of your children, joint-family vacations.

Greek life is incredibly popular for various reasons, such as networking, philanthropy, scholarships, opportunities for leadership, and making friends that will last a lifetime. Other reasons include hella clout and much more access to booze and drugs.

As a girl who likes to do her research, I've done all of the investigating so you don't have to. Trust me, ladies, I saved you a LOT of time.

1. The "Un-Fratty" Guy

This guy is unlike all the rest in everything from music style to dress. He doesn't seem to eat and breathe Greek life and he actually seems normal.

2. The Tool

If he isn't talking about how much he can bench or staring in the mirror, he's probably asleep. Only wears Vineyard Vines.

3. The "Daddy Pays For My Tuition AND Alcohol Fund" Guy


What does this guy's dad do for a living? Who knows, but dude has never had a job, studies something in business, and always ends up on the beach for spring break.

4. The Brain

Actually values books over boobs and booze. Definitely here for the scholarships.

5. The Nice Guy

This fella actually has good intentions for his friends. He's a huge sweetheart!

6. The Creep

Probably spikes punch and for sure gropes while passing girls in the bar.

7. The "How Is Your Liver Still Operational" Guy

Passed out during the pregame, woke up at 2 a.m. to rally. Missed a final exam because he was still drunk. Can you please go make sure your friend is still alive?

8. The Guy With No Personality

This guy joined a frat because he's a total yes-man. And because he can't talk to girls.

In all seriousness: attending a big university introduces you to people from all walks of life. You'll meet people who are from opposite ends of the country, or the world, who you have more in common with than anyone you have ever met. You'll also meet people who you have nothing in common with except where you decided to attend school.

Don't judge a book by its cover, and never judge a boy by his fraternity..unless they have a history of spiking jungle juice. Then stay the f*ck away from them.

Cover Image Credit: @totalfratmove

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