7 Badass Ladies Of Recent Women's History

7 Badass Ladies Of Recent Women's History

Taking down the patriarchy, one woman at a time.
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Women's History Month just kicked off this past March 1st. And with women's issues recently taking the spotlight with the Women's March on Washington, here are a few badass ladies of this recent decade who have been paving the way for gender equality and representation.

1. Hillary Clinton

Regardless of whether or not you agree with her political views, you have to admit that Hillary Clinton has made a large difference for women in politics. For the first time in American history, Hillary Clinton was the first woman to ever be nominated for president by a major political party. However, before her presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton also served as Secretary of State under the Obama administration, the first female Senator from New York, and as First Lady fought for gender equality and health care reform.

2. Viola Davis

Viola Davis recently made headlines after her moving acceptance speech after receiving Academy Award for Best Actress for her work in Fences. And while many audiences feel that Davis' Oscar was well overdue, Viola Davis is the only African-American woman to be nominated for an Academy Award three times. And as of last week, Viola Davis is the only African American to receive the Triple Crown of Acting. And while her awards deem her to be very prestigious, Viola Davis recently shared what it was like growing up in poverty in her hometown of Central Falls, Rhode Island, "I was one of those kids who were poor and knew it."

3. Ruby Rose

Ruby Rose recently made her mark in Hollywood after joining the cast of Netflix's Orange is the New Black. Since her debut, Ruby Rose has challenged society's standards as to what defines feminity and gender fluidity. Ruby Rose has not conformed to any gender stereotypes, both personally and professionally, and has no plans to. Furthermore, Ruby Rose has also become an iconic name in LGBT actors and actresses.

4. Beyonce

You can't have an article talking about badass ladies without mentioning Beyonce. Not only is she currently one of the most recognizable Grammy Award winning singers and songwriters, Beyonce has also focused much of her effort towards empowering the Black Community. In her most recent visual album, Lemonade, Beyonce made countless references about Black Lives Matter and standing up against police brutality. In her music video for her latest single, Formation, Beyonce also focused on the residents of New Orleans post-Hurricane Katrina. Beyonce has also fought for gender equality and empowering women through her music and performances.

5. Lavern Cox

Famous for her work in Netflix's Orange is the New Black, Lavern Cox has focused her career towards empowering the transgender community. Lavern Cox is the first transgender person to be nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award, and the first transgender person to grace the cover of TIME magazine. Lavern Cox was also recently honored by GLAAD and received the Stephen F. Kolzak Award for her advocacy in the transgender community.

6. Gina Rodriguez

Star of and Emmy Award winner The CW's Jane the Virgin, Gina Rodriguez has become Hollywood's best breakout star and an advocate the Hispanic community. Daughter of two Puerto Rican immigrants, Gina Rodriguez has focused much of her career to accurately depicting Latinos in the media. Gina Rodriguez has also been an advocate for several anti-bullying campaigns and has started the #MovementMonday on Twitter to raise awareness for minorities all over the world.

7. Chrissy Teigen

Model and television personality Chrissy Teigen has never been afraid to express herself and speak her mind. Chrissy Teigen has been a huge advocate for the Free the Nipple Campaign and for gender equality. Chrissy Teigen has also never been afraid to stand up her critics, including President Donald Trump, on her social media.

Cover Image Credit: The New York Times

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A Recent Sports Bra Suspension At Rowan University Has Gotten Female Athletes Outraged

A recent ban was placed on the Men and Women's Cross Country Athletes from using their designated practice facility.

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UPDATE: Following the publication of this article, Rowan University administration has released a statement ending the sports bra ban and a statement regarding the usage of athletic facilities by the Cross Country team.

If you're running in a sports bra, then you must be asking for it, right? Well, according to a football player at Rowan University, this is true.

I'll have you know the real reason women run in sports bras, and it's not to show off our hard-earned abs. Women, whether they have a six-pack or not, run in sports bras because, quite frankly, it's hot outside. We run in sports bras because our workouts are demanding, challenging, and vigorous.

We run in sports bras because we are confident, hardworking student-athletes.

We do not run in a sports bra as a way to show off our bodies in attempts to distract men.

Out of the 15 Rowan University Women Cross Country athletes, all of them believe running in sports bras at practice should be allowed. Even the girls who don't partake in shirtless runs at practice still believe the other members of the team should be permitted to wear whatever they feel confident in.

The Cross Country team at Rowan is one of the only teams that is not provided with a daily uniform to practice in. With that being said, how is it expected for the women on this team to partake in an non-existing dress code?

A meeting was held with the Women's Cross Country Coach and the Athletic Director to address this issue resulting in the verdict of the women on the team no longer being able to run in sports bras. If that wasn't already enough of an outrage, it was also decided the women were no longer allowed to run on the track.

Women running around the track in sports bras at their own practice were claimed to be distracting to the football players on the field during the same time.

As if the women no longer being able to run in sports bras wasn't enough, now they're no longer allowed to run on the track, period. The girls are now mandated to run on the local high school track on workout days.

In 2015, Rowan University officially finished their new $4.6 million athletic practice facility. The practice facility includes two fields for football, soccer, field hockey, and lacrosse athletes. There is a dedicated practice area for each team. The men and women Cross Country teams have their track. Now they no longer have that privilege.

The problem here is not the women on the team. The problem is not the women wearing sports bras. The problem is not women's bodies.

Rape culture is the problem.

The fact that the Athletic Department supports the claim of this being distracting, or the women "asking for it," is disgusting. Mind you, the Athletic Department put together a video involving student-athletes addressing rape culture and how it is not tolerated here. Oh, is that so?

"As girls, we could look at the football team and say that their tight pants showing off everything is asking for it, but we don't. When we are on the track, we are doing a hard workout that requires all our focus, so we aren't looking at them and what they are doing. If they are distracted by us, then their practices clearly don't require their full attention, or they just aren't as committed to the sport." -Anonymous source

In the world of professional athletics, all female Elite runners are permitted to wear racing crop tops. Not only are they non-restricting, but they are a trendy, comfortable, and empowering part of the running culture.

As women, we are constantly reminded that we should be ashamed or embarrassed about our bodies. It's 2018, and yet women are still being objectified with their physical appearance.

As a nation, we are taking a step back into history, and as a University, we are teaching student-athletes that this is acceptable.

The women on this team not only represent the University but the growing community of female runners. It's time women are allowed to embrace their bodies and not live in constant fear of being degraded by men.

Women, athletes or not, deserve to use their voice and take a stance. The future generations are watching. Let's set a good example.


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I've Had PTSD, And I'll Be The First To Say I Did Not Need A Gun While I Was Sick

My opinion on gun control not from my political opinions, but from my experiences as a mentally ill person.

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On November 7th, 2018, a gunman armed with a .45-caliber Glock handgun walked into Borderline Bar & Grill in Thousand Oaks, California and killed 12 people.

In addition to the 11 slain and 18 injured in the bar, the gunman killed a sheriff's sergeant responding to the 911 call before committing suicide.

The gunman was Ian David Long, a former U.S. Marine apparently suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

While all of the 307 mass shootings that make it onto the news make my soul ache, this one particularly hit home for me for two reasons.

One: I lived in California for about five years and had indeed spent time in the area.

Two: these atrocities were committed by someone of whom PTSD had gotten the better of.

Having had PTSD for 15 years myself, it baffles me that he had a legally-owned gun at all.

I know first-hand how much anger can develop when this disorder is left unchecked, and violence is the most delicious release from it all.

From self-harm to physical fighting in school, I looked for any way to curb my appetite for destruction. As soon as my body sensed an opportunity to expel some of my pent-up aggression on someone who'd even mildly taunted the beast, my brain would enter into a hazy fog of emotion and a nothing-to-lose attitude. My fight-or-flight was constantly engaged, and I really had never been much of a runner.

I felt like my temper was a bottle rocket that could be set off at any moment and I had next to no control over whether or not I reacted. I remember loving the power of people being afraid of me and relishing in my ability to win at all costs, especially if it were in defense of myself or someone who needed help.

Since the opportunities to let my feelings out physically were few and far between, my brain provided a platform for the rest of them without an outlet. The majority of my life, I was plagued with violent fantasies as much––if not more––than the sexual ones, which should've been my sole focus as a horny teenager.

In these fantasies, I would be defending myself and others from unknown assailants, escaping from situations where I was being detained as a sex slave, or else exacting revenge on someone who'd wronged me. Every movement of the altercation I would replay over and over again in my head until it was almost a memory.

These fantasies bordered on an obsession while I suffered from paranoia. Every waking and even unconscious moment was filled with the absolute certainty that someone was waiting behind the corner to physically assault or rape me, and I would not entertain the idea of letting that happen.

I used to boast that the next time someone attacked me, only one of us would come out of it alive.

I imagined these him-or-me altercations constantly—before I went to sleep, day-dreaming in class or else in places where I felt especially uneasy—and sometimes the story lines would continue on all week until they finished off with me emerging victorious.

Every fantasy would not be considered complete until I had won and gone insane. For some reason, my brain rationalized that as soon as the inevitable attack came and everyone became aware of it, my mind could finally be at rest.

These fantasies were so intense that I would have physical reactions to them. I was basically powerless to shut them down once my imagination got going, so I would sweat excessively, tremble with anticipation and sometimes even laugh out loud with the adrenaline they inspired. It got to the point where I could actually taste the iron in my mouth, as if my body was already preparing for the taste of blood.

This mindset didn't come without an intense fascination in weapons. My fantasies would include actual weapons, random items I employed in resourcefulness to defend myself or merely fighting to the death with my bare hands.

I collected the few I could afford at the time and ached for the days when I could own my own gun. I had never fired one, but I was entranced by the idea of owning the ultimate fighting utensil; an end-all to any threats that may come my way, with the power to take a life at the tip of my finger.

My gravitation towards violence ended after two years of recovering from PTSD. One day I realized I hadn't thought about it in a while, and just like that, the freakish obsession I'd harbored since childhood was gone.

I experienced all of this, yet the trauma that provided me with the disorder didn't have one single thing to do with guns.

So why on the Goddess' green earth did an ex-machine gunner, who developed his PTSD from shooting people, have legal access to one?

Though California does have a law asserting that families concerned with their loved ones' safety can request their guns be taken away for a period of time, this was not enough to spare the lives of those 12 innocent people that Wednesday night.

I shiver at the thought of what would've happened if I had gotten my hands on a gun when I had wanted one. So based on my expertise, neither Long nor anyone else with PTSD has any business owning a gun.

Who better to weigh in on these issues than the ones posing an obvious threat?

Yet, even after this testimony of how much I wanted to pull the trigger at one point, there will still be people who insist on loading the bullets and cocking it for me.

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