11 Boy Scout Skills That Prepare You For College

11 Boy Scout Skills That Prepare You For College

Scouting and Studying go together quite nicely
6249
views

Being a part of the Boy Scouts was a huge part of my life. I became an Eagle Scout at the age of 15 and continued on to earn 11 Eagle Palms, which are awarded for every three months of continued activity, leadership, and five merit badges. Scouting played a huge role in making who I am today. Today, I am a college student. To most people, they believe that scouting only teaches you to build fires and set-up tents, but scouting truly teaches you so much more.

1. Tying Knots


You read that right. Anyone who has to deal with moving and transporting equipment has had to know a good knot or two to hold everything together. As a rower, when we leave to compete, we have to tie up our boats, oars, riggers, and other equipment tightly so that they do not fall off the trailer. It also applies to moving in and out of dorms. Have to tie extra bags to the roof of your car or secure them in your truck bed? There is a knot for that too. I certainly know a few people in the rock climbing club who definitely need to know knots too.

2. Time Management

Five merit badges each month sounds easy right? Having to work with a merit badge counselor, Scoutmaster, whoever manages the merit badges, and not to mention getting all the requirements done can get a little complicated. It takes time and planning to make sure you can get everything done on time. Group projects are a breeze if you can get your work done, schedule around your group members' times, and get it turned in on time. The same goes for multiple homework assignments from different classes. Manage your time and set goals. They will be easily completed without a rush.

3. Teamwork

The ability to work with people of all kinds is an important skill for many aspects of life. Being in the Boy Scouts has allowed me to meet and work with a variety people from many walks of life. Those experiences have allowed me to enhance my own teamwork abilities, and thus help my team. I'm not just talking sports teams. There are other groups that require teamwork too, like study groups, lab partners, and group assignments.

4. Leadership

Speaking of teamwork, sometimes you have to take the reigns. Leadership is a core value in the Boy Scouts. Scouting offers a variety of leadership roles such as quartermaster, historian, patrol leader, troop guide and more. The most important form of leadership I learned was servant leadership. The team does not work for you, you work WITH the team. I have found this form of leadership to be most applicable to those in leadership positions of clubs. The best way to improve a club is to lead the way, not tell the members which way to go and watch them wander.

5. Cooking

No, I do not have a gas stove or fire pit in my dorm room. Yes, I have taken two Home Ec classes. What I mean by cooking is how important food and the preparation of it is. Home Ec taught me how to cook and health class barely taught me the food pyramid (Is that still a thing?). Cooking in scouts has taught me how to properly nourish myself on my own. I've learned how to make the best, quick cold cut sandwiches and can cook up an exquisite meal using only leftovers. Being the grubmaster on camp outs has also taught me to be thrifty when buying enough food, even finding good deals for a little extra. Using every bit of what you buy can help cut into your grocery bill.

6. Adaptability

Thanks to scouting, I have had the opportunity to travel to many places and do many things I would have not been able to without. Going to all of these places and doing so many activities usually required me to get used to a new environment. When I attended the World Scouting Jamboree in Sweden, I had to learn to communicate with people who did not speak my languages, English and German. While I was at the National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience in Philmont, I had to get used to the hot and dry environment while performing first aid and search and rescue exercises. Let's just say the weather doesn't bother me anymore. College will end up placing you in many different situations that you will have to adapt to or risk not performing well.

7. The Importance of Physical Fitness

Scouting offers many outdoors adventures from hiking to whitewater rafting. Everything we did required some level of physical fitness. PE and Health class did teach me about physical fitnes, btu scouting really nailed how important it is to maintain a good level of physical fitness for life. In college, we are usually confined to a desk, bench, or bed. It's is easy to pick up that habit of staying there and continuing it once you leave college. If I maintained a more sedentary lifestyle through college, I would not be able to do all the activities I loved doing in scouts once I leave.

8. First Aid

I'm not talking about running to the scene of an accident on you way to class, I'm talking about the little things that can add up. Knowing first aid also means you knows how to treat yourself. While studying, it is easy to focus too much on that and not on your health. I have had several friends become very dehydrated because they did not bring a drink and did not want to leave to go get one. First aid also comes in handy in case of an accident in the lab for you science majors.

9. The Importance of Community Service

Giving back to your community is something I firmly believe in. Whether it is a merit badge or an Eagle project, scouting requires community service to be performed in some way. There are a multitude of ways you can serve your community. When you help out your community, you build a bond with the people you work with. It is an excellent way to get you out of your room too.

10. Fun and Work are not mutually exclusive

The Order of the Arrow, a group within scouting, emphasizes cheerful service. It has taught me that no matter how arduous my task, I can do it with a smile. It may not be the most fun thing in the world, but I can make the most of it. You can enjoy whatever work you are doing as long as you view it that way.

11. Keeping to my Values

Even though I am no longer a Boy Scout, I continue to live the Scout Oath and Law in my everyday life to the best of my ability. These sets of values have helped guide my morals and decisions as I matured. In college, you will have your values challenged. Of course, this is not a bad thing. You should also listen with an open mind, btu you should not be so quick to change your mind on your values. Scouting gave me firm groundwork to lay my values, ethics, and morals. I still build on it to this day.



Cover Image Credit: James Stephenson

Popular Right Now

20 Signs You Were A High School Cheerleader

You got really tired of hearing, "Point your toes."
111693
views

Cheerleading is something you'll never forget. It takes hard work, dedication, and comes with its ups and downs. Here are some statements that every cheerleader, past and present, know to be true.

1. You always had bobby pins with you.

2. Fear shot through you if you couldn't find your spankees right away and thought you left them at home.

3. You accumulated about 90 new pairs of tennis shoes...

4. ...and about 90 new bows, bags, socks, and warm ups.

5. When you hear certain songs from old cheer dance mixes it either ruins your day or brings back happy memories.

6. And chances are, you still remember every move to those dances.

7. Sometimes you catch yourself standing with your hands on your hips.

8. You know the phrase, "One more time, ladies" all too well.

9. The hospitality rooms were always one of the biggest perks of going to tournaments (at least for me).

10. You got really tired of hearing, "Point your toes."

SEE ALSO: How The Term 'Cheerlebrity' Destroyed Our Sport

11. If you left the gym at half-time to go get something, you better be back by the time the boys run back out.

12. You knew how awkward it could be on the bus rides home after the boys lost.

13. But you also knew how fun it could be if they won.

14. Figuring out line-up was extremely important – especially if one of your members was gone.

15. New uniforms were so exciting; minus the fact that they cost a fortune.

16. You know there was nothing worse than when you called out an offense cheer but halfway through, you had to switch to the defense version because someone turned over the ball.

17. You still know the school fight song by heart and every move that goes with it.

SEE ALSO: Signs You Suffer From Post-Cheerleading Depression

18. UCA Cheer Camp cheers and chants still haunt you to this day.

19. You know the difference between a clasp and a clap. Yes, they're different.

20. There's always a part of you that will miss cheering and it will always have a place in your heart.

Cover Image Credit: Doug Pool / Facebook

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

3 Tips To Drafting A Fantasy Football Team

How to Navigate the Complex Landscape of the Nerd's Take on America's Game

1462
views

It will be fun, they said. It's easy! You just pick players and when they play well you do well! They said. Well, all you are thinking now is what did I get myself into. The draft clock ticks away as you try to pick a player. Your brother talks nonstop about Tom Brady, but when you tried to pick him, your brother yelled in protest and started blabbering on about something called ADP. You just did this because everyone else was, you don't know what YAC is or how a player's ODP should affect their draft stock. Well, while I won't be able to give you every bit of advice to make 100% sure you'll be gloating to your old bro at the season's end, I can get you up to speed on this crazy game of sports and numbers.

Part One: The Basics

Giphy

For you beginning out there that barely know what a football is and are only in this because a friend begged you to fill a spot, this paragraph is a good place to start. Simply put, fantasy football is a game where you pick players who play real, NFL football in the hopes that they perform well. When the real games are played out, the better these players that you have on your team do, the more points you score. If the player you have scores a touchdown, that's six points. There are points for yards, field goals, negative points for a player throwing an interception, and sometimes a point is given just for catching the ball. But don't worry about all that. So, you have your players from all different teams in the NFL and you have your team play against another team from your fantasy league in a game of whose players can perform better in the real football game. The team with the most points wins.

Part Two: The Draft

Giphy

Now that we have the basics down we move on to the draft. Ah yes, they save the most confusing part of fantasy football for the very beginning. The draft can be daunting. It can be difficult trying to coordinate positions, byes, teams, and considering a myriad of other factors everyone else is telling you are essential. I'd like to break it down into three simple tips on draft day:

1. Use your first three picks on either RBs or WRs.

c1.staticflickr.com

Don't even think about anything other than these two positions for your first three picks. Some people may tell you to take a tight end, but I'm telling you there's talent later in the draft at that position. Focus on these two positions. In most leagues, you will need two RBs (Running Backs) and two WRs (Wide Receivers) plus a fifth slot for either an RB or a WR called a Flex. When you draft, the game will suggest players that people have taken when drafting at the same position you are. Players with lower numbers are traditionally being picked earlier and are generally better. Try to find 2 RBs and 1 WR or vice versa in those first three rounds if you can.

2. Don't draft a QB until after the 10th round. 

c1.staticflickr.com

Quarterback is the most important position in real football and most of the famous players (Aaron Rodgers, Tom Brady, and others) are quarterbacks. In fantasy, they are not as important. The best QBs and the middle-of-the-pack QBs will score very similar numbers from week to week, so look for better players at WR, RB, and TE before you pick a QB. Good players to target at QB are Matt Ryan (Falcons) and Phillip Rivers (Chargers)

3. Wait to draft your defense and kicker until the final four rounds. 

upload.wikimedia.org

It can be tempting to look to fill that Kicker and that Defense slot early to make sure you have all the players you need, but trust me, wait. Remember when I said the difference between the best and the ok QBs is a small difference? It's even smaller for a kicker and a defense. Wait until the very end of the draft until you pick up anyone at these positions. If you have a favorite team it can be fun to pick their defense, as long as they are a good team their defense will do the trick.

So there you have it, three beginner tips for drafting a fantasy football team. Remember to relax, it's only a game, and have fun! Happy drafting!

Related Content

Facebook Comments