Why Millennials Hate Hillary Clinton

Why Millennials Hate Hillary Clinton

Dear Hillary Clinton, dear Amy Schumer, dear Clara Jeffery and dear fake leftists everywhere, I am a millennial and I hate Hillary Clinton.
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I watched a BBC interview of Amy Schumer. She was asked about the election and the hatred Hillary Clinton. Schumer responded “That’s what I am saying with the not being informed because those people aren’t informed. You know, they, if you go, why don’t you like Hillary? They’ll go she lied about her emails. What else is she gonna lie about? People get one fact and that’s what they latch on to about a candidate. They go you know she lied about that. I’m like, Donald Trump has a fake college. Donald Trump doesn’t pay his workers. He won’t release his taxes. There has never been a nominee who has ever not released their taxes. I haven’t had a conversation with anyone who doesn’t like Hillary where they’ve had anything meaningful to say.”

Mother Jones Editor in chief Clara Jeffery sent out this tweet.

Dear Hillary Clinton, dear Amy Schumer, dear Clara Jeffery and dear fake leftists everywhere, I am a millennial. I hate Hillary Clinton. I want to explain to you why us millennials hate Hillary Clinton. I am going to give you meaningful legitimate reasons as to why millennials won’t just “fall in line” and vote blue. I’m tired of seeing non-millennials explain why millennials hate Hillary. You non-millennials need to stop. PLEASE, you are embarrassing yourselves. We millennials won’t fall in line and follow the grand queen because we are not sheep. Ms. Schumer, we don’t dislike her because we are uninformed. We dislike her because we are very informed. That’s why many millennials are looking at other options. We know Donald Trump is a buffoon and a disaster but Hillary Clinton is also a massive disaster. We will not choose between which candidate is less of a disaster.

Amy Schumer said she has yet to have a conversation with someone who has anything meaningful to say as to why they hate Hillary. I understand that there are idiot far right wingers who scream “BENGHAZI” to the mountain tops and make up conspiracy theories about her. Throw that out of the window. We are not right wingers. We don’t hate Hillary because of those obviously false conspiracies. We hate her because she is a horrible candidate. Here is what makes her a horrible candidate:

  • She voted for the illegal war in Iraq that killed a minimum of 100,000 civilians. By 2053, the Iraq would cost the US taxpayers $7 trillion dollars. She was in favor of killing hundreds of thousands to millions of innocent civilians but she claims we will never have universal healthcare which is much cheaper. She said the Iraq war should be viewed as a “business opportunity.” She was in favor of a war on terror that costs trillions of dollars that has made us less safe and that has created more jihadist and terrorist. That’s what democrats, progressives, and millennials are supposed to support?
  • She is in favor of more intervention and is extremely hawkish. She said that she learned from her errors in voting for the Iraq War yet she wants to create a No Fly Zone in Syria. If Russian planes fly over Syria, they will be shot which could potentially lead to a Third World War. Only 17% of the country still want to be involved in the wars that we are involved in now. Hillary wants to get involved in more war.
  • She voted for the Patriot act. The Patriot Act essentially says “ the Fourth Amendment? LOL, what’s a fourth amendment? Constitution? Pleeeeease. You have no protection from unreasonable search and seizures. The government is allowed to collect your metadata and watch everything you do.”
  • While she was Secretary of State, she gave an exemption to South Sudan for their child soldiers so the US could continue to give them arms because they are our allies. Let me say that again. Hillary gave South Sudan exemptions so they could continue to arm child soldiers. Does she fight for children?
  • In a 1996 news conference she infamously called black youth “super predators” and said they must be brought to “heel”. When a young black woman held up a sign of her infamous quote “We have to bring them to heel”, and asked Hillary to apologize to black people for mass incarceration, Hillary responded by brushing her aside and continuing with her speech. The youth black woman was escorted out of the room and Hillary said: “ok, back to the issues”. She is essentially saying the mass incarceration and the war on drugs that have destroyed black communities are not an issue.

  • Hillary Clinton claims to fight for women’s rights while she armed Saudi Arabia. In Saudi Arabia, women are second class citizens. Women must cover up from head to toe and they aren’t allowed to drive. Saudi Arabia is bombing women and children in Yemen RIGHT NOW with weapons that Hillary supplied. How can you claim to fight for women’s rights when you are arming a nation where women don’t matter? Oh, I get it, Hillary fights for women and children as long as they are not brown women and children.
  • She supported NAFTA and CAFTA which are outsourcing deals that cost America millions of jobs and is the reason Detroit collapsed and is no longer a great city.
  • She supported Wall Street deregulation which caused the subprime mortgage crisis and the great recession. Then she turned around and blamed home owners for the subprime mortgage crisis.
  • She pushed for the TPP 45 times before she said she was against it.
  • She hired Tim Kaine as her VP who a corporatist, supports the TPP, supporters right to work laws which destroy unions and lowers wages, is supported by Wall Street and large banks, he is in favor of fracking, he voted for more money in politics… pretty much, he is a male Hillary Clinton.
  • She was against the Bankruptcy Bill as the First Lady and was able to convince Bill Clinton to veto the bill. After she became a senator and took money from the credit industry who wanted the bankruptcy bill passed, the bill was reintroduced. She then voted in favor of that bill.
  • She was a big believer in universal healthcare. Once she took money from the health care industry she said “we will never have universal healthcare.”
  • Hillary was coronated by the DNC and the mainstream media. Before WikiLeaks revealed that the primaries were rigged against Bernie Sanders towards Hillary Clinton, Sanders supporters screamed about that and were told that they are crazy conspiracy theorist. Now that the cat is out of the bag, instead of admitting their wrongdoing and apologizing to Sanders supporters and progressives, the DNC and mainstream media blamed Russian hackers instead of taking responsibility for the wrong that they did.
  • She is in favor of the Keystone Pipeline and promoted fracking all across the world.
  • The Clintons in their lifetimes have raised over $3 billion dollars from special interest groups

There are many more reasons why millennials dislike Hillary. The biggest reason we dislike Hillary is not because we are uninformed, it’s because we are very informed. Unlike the older generations, we do not get our information from the corrupt mainstream media outlets. We have the internet. We don’t wait until the 10 o’ clock nightly news for the news anchors to lie to us. We instantly check the internet. We have video evidence of Hillary consistently lying to us. More importantly, an entire generation of voters who voted for the first time was told to sit down and shut up. Our vote didn’t matter. The DNC did everything they could to make sure our vote didn’t matter as a result; we are stuck with the worst democratic candidate in history.

We understand that Trump is a horrible candidate. I believe that Trump is a worse candidate than Hillary Clinton by a margin but Donald Trump being a horrible candidate does not make Hillary any less horrible. If Hillary Clinton wants young people to vote for her, she has to earn our votes. She is not entitled to our vote. We will not come out for candidates because one is less bad than the other. That will only continue to get us horrible candidates that don’t represent us. Hillary Clinton and the mainstream media are content saying that if Hillary loses, it is our fault. Those people are operating under the premise that the only the people can fail the politicians and the politicians can never fail the people.

Hillary, if you were actually liberal and you were actually progressive, millennials would have no problem voting for you. But the fact that you are a lying, corrupt, corporatist, neo-con parading as a liberal and progressive, actual liberals and progressives won’t vote for you even in the face of an orange faced, buffoon, fascist like Donald Trump. The DNC showed us our vote didn’t matter during the primaries and the mainstream media published stories saying Hillary doesn’t need our vote to win. Now that millennials are not voting for her, the DNC has collectively shit the bed because we are not voting for a candidate who they said didn’t need us. A vote for Hillary Clinton is like watching someone spit in our food and being told we have to eat it anyway because the other meal has rat poison in it. We choose not to eat either meal when we can buy something else because we have other options. Those other options are Jill Stein and Gary Johnson. We not only have the right to vote, we have the right to know who we can vote for. That’s why on November 8th, 2016, I will cast my vote for Jill Stein because it is time to reject the lesser evil and fight for the greater good like our lives depend on it because they do. Those are the reasons us millennials hate Hillary Clinton. It is not because we are uninformed, it’s because we are very informed. Clara Jeffery, don’t hate millennials for hating Hillary Clinton, you should hate her for being a horrible candidate.

On a side note:

The upcoming presidential election is much more than just an election. It is a fight for our democracy. Whether you are a Clinton supporter, Trump supporter, Stein supporter or a Johnson supporter, it is important that you have the right to vote. Please Join Unity for democracy on October 23rd, 2016 in Washington DC to March take back your democracy and prevent America from becoming the corporatocracy that it is well on its way to becoming. This is a nonpartisan event that is committed to making sure that your voice and your vote will always matter. To learn more information, you click here to visit the Facebook page. If you can't make it but you would like to help fund the event, you can donate by clicking here. You matter. Make sure your voice and your vote makes a difference.


Cover Image Credit: Youtube.com

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Your Wait time At Theme Parks Is Not Unfair, You're Just Impatient

Your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself.

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Toy Story Land at Disney's Hollywood Studios "unboxed" on June 30, 2018. My friend and I decided to brave the crowds on opening day. We got to the park around 7 AM only to find out that the park opened around 6 AM. Upon some more scrolling through multiple Disney Annual Passholder Facebook groups, we discovered that people were waiting outside the park as early as 1 AM.

We knew we'd be waiting in line for the bulk of the Toy Story Land unboxing day. There were four main lines in the new land: the line to enter the land; the line for Slinky Dog Dash, the new roller coaster; the line for Alien Spinning Saucers, the easier of the new rides in the land; Toy Story Mania, the (now old news) arcade-type ride; and the new quick-service restaurant, Woody's Lunchbox (complete with grilled cheese and "grown-up drinks").

Because we were so early, we did not have to wait in line to get into the land. We decided to ride Alien Spinning Saucers first. The posted wait time was 150 minutes, but my friend timed the line and we only waited for 50 minutes. Next, we tried to find the line for Slinky Dog Dash. After receiving conflicting answers, the runaround, and even an, "I don't know, good luck," from multiple Cast Members, we exited the land to find the beginning of the Slinky line. We were then told that there was only one line to enter the park that eventually broke off into the Slinky line. We were not about to wait to get back into the area we just left, so we got a Fastpass for Toy Story Mania that we didn't plan on using in order to be let into the land sooner. We still had to wait for our time, so we decided to get the exclusive Little Green Man alien popcorn bin—this took an entire hour. We then used our Fastpass to enter the land, found the Slinky line, and proceeded to wait for two and a half hours only for the ride to shut down due to rain. But we've come this far and rain was not about to stop us. We waited an hour, still in line and under a covered area, for the rain to stop. Then, we waited another hour and a half to get on the ride from there once it reopened (mainly because they prioritized people who missed their Fastpass time due to the rain). After that, we used the mobile order feature on the My Disney Experience app to skip part of the line at Woody's Lunchbox.

Did you know that there is actually a psychological science to waiting? In the hospitality industry, this science is the difference between "perceived wait" and "actual wait." A perceived wait is how long you feel like you are waiting, while the actual wait is, of course, the real and factual time you wait. There are eight things that affect the perceived wait time: unoccupied time feels longer than occupied time, pre-process waits feel longer than in-process waits, anxiety makes waits feel longer, uncertain waits are longer than certain waits, unexplained waits are longer than explained waits, unfair waits are longer than equitable waits, people will wait longer for more valuable service and solo waiting feels longer than group waiting.

Our perceived wait time for Alien Spinning Saucers was short because we expected it to be longer. Our wait for the popcorn seemed longer because it was unoccupied and unexplained. Our wait for the rain to stop so the ride could reopen seemed shorter because it was explained. Our wait between the ride reopening and getting on the coaster seemed longer because it felt unfair for Disney to let so many Fastpass holders through while more people waited through the rain. Our entire wait for Slinky Dog Dash seemed longer because we were not told the wait time in the beginning. Our wait for our food after placing a mobile order seemed shorter because it was an in-process wait. We also didn't mind wait long wait times for any of these experiences because they were new and we placed more value on them than other rides or restaurants at Disney. The people who arrived at 1 AM just added five hours to their perceived wait

Some non-theme park examples of this science of waiting in the hospitality industry would be waiting at a restaurant, movie theater, hotel, performance or even grocery store. When I went to see "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom," the power went out in the theater right as we arrived. Not only did we have to wait for it to come back and for them to reset the projectors, I had to wait in a bit of anxiety because the power outage spooked me. It was only a 30-minute wait but felt so much longer. At the quick-service restaurant where I work, we track the time from when the guest places their order to the time they receive their food. Guests in the drive-thru will complain about 10 or more minute waits, when our screens tell us they have only been waiting four or five minutes. Their actual wait was the four or five minutes that we track because this is when they first request our service, but their perceived wait begins the moment they pull into the parking lot and join the line because this is when they begin interacting with our business. While in line, they are experiencing pre-process wait times; after placing the order, they experience in-process wait times.

Establishments in the hospitality industry do what they can to cut down on guests' wait times. For example, theme parks offer services like Disney's Fastpass or Universal's Express pass in order to cut down the time waiting in lines so guests have more time to buy food and merchandise. Stores like Target or Wal-Mart offer self-checkout to give guests that in-process wait time. Movie theaters allow you to check in and get tickets on a mobile app and some quick-service restaurants let you place mobile or online orders. So why do people still get so bent out of shape about being forced to wait?

On Toy Story Land unboxing day, I witnessed a woman make a small scene about being forced to wait to exit the new land. Cast Members were regulating the flow of traffic in and out of the land due to the large crowd and the line that was in place to enter the land. Those exiting the land needed to wait while those entering moved forward from the line. Looking from the outside of the situation as I was, this all makes sense. However, the woman I saw may have felt that her wait was unfair or unexplained. She switched between her hands on her hips and her arms crossed, communicated with her body language that she was not happy. Her face was in a nasty scowl at those entering the land and the Cast Members in the area. She kept shaking her head at those in her group and when allowed to proceed out of the land, I could tell she was making snide comments about the wait.

At work, we sometimes run a double drive-thru in which team members with iPads will take orders outside and a sequencer will direct cars so that they stay in the correct order moving toward the window. In my experience as the sequencer, I will inform the drivers which car to follow, they will acknowledge me and then still proceed to dart in front of other cars just so they make it to the window maybe a whole minute sooner. Not only is this rude, but it puts this car and the cars around them at risk of receiving the wrong food because they are now out of order. We catch these instances more often than not, but it still adds stress and makes the other guests upset. Perhaps these guests feel like their wait is also unfair or unexplained, but if they look at the situation from the outside or from the restaurant's perspective, they would understand why they need to follow the blue Toyota.

The truth of the matter is that your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself. We all want instant gratification, I get it. But in reality, we have to wait for some things. It takes time to prepare a meal. It takes time to experience a ride at a theme park that everyone else wants to go on. It takes time to ring up groceries. It takes patience to live in this world.

So next time you find yourself waiting, take a minute to remember the difference between perceived and actual wait times. Think about the eight aspects of waiting that affect your perceived wait. Do what you can to realize why you are waiting or keep yourself occupied in this wait. Don't be impatient. That's no way to live your life.

Cover Image Credit:

Aranxa Esteve

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Why it Sucks to ban plastic straws

We need a solution you can't find at the bottom of a Starbucks Cup

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I have never heard or read about straws more than I have this past month. This July, Starbucks and the entirety of Seattle announced plans to eliminate the use of plastic straws altogether. Plastic pollution accounts for the most dangerous threat to ocean life today, with research showing that by 2050, the plastic in the world's oceans will outnumber the fish if we continue consuming plastic at our current rate.

So this plastic straw ban seems like a good and welcomed change, right? As it turns out, wrong! The straw ban, while it should be a positive light at the end of the news tunnel, actually reveals the darker implications of the current social, economic, and environmental climate of today's society.

1. The straw ban provides no flexibility for disabled people

While many people were ecstatic about the plastic straw ban and took to social media lauding the companies and cities for their decision, disabled people spoke up against it. Plastic straws are extremely useful and a NECESSITY for many disabled people around the world.

As one Twitter user explained in a thread of tweets, that without straws, their lives would be much more difficult and many straw alternatives simply would not work.

By banning straws, we have ignored 56.7 million people. Even if not every disabled person relies on straws, by refusing to listen to those who do, we are silencing an entire community and making them feel as if their struggle and way of life is irrelevant.

2. Plastic straws: More Dangerous than Guns!, apparently

Guns violence kills 96 Americans a day (U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). As of today, July 11, 2018, 7,613 people have been killed by guns.

The movement to reform gun laws has been around since the Gun Control Act was passed in 1968 with the purpose of "keeping firearms out of the hands of those not legally entitled to possess them because of age, criminal background, or incompetence". Since then, people have been working tirelessly in the movement to reform, restrict, and recently, repeal the use of guns.

Compared to plastic straws which have only been widely used since the 1960s, the path to gun control has been far longer and exhausting. And which got banned first in America?

3. The real enemies

Multi-million dollar corporations are the biggest offenders of environmental protection and conservation in the world.

Nestle, the company behind a bottled water brand, is one of the biggest contributors to plastic waste in the world. Silos containing 125 tons of plastic resin are used to bottle water. This water mostly comes from sources in California, a state that is being affected by an extreme drought. Another source is in Flint, Michigan, where its residents have been suffering from a lack of clean drinking water. The bottles of water being sold by Nestle take advantage of people who need the water they are packaging. And the packaging goes straight into the ocean.

Gas and oil companies have been long criticized for the part they play in environmental pollution. In January, the city of New York filed a lawsuit against big oil companies BP, Chevron, Conoco-Phillips, ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell on the claim that together, the companies produced 11% of all of global-warming inducing gases through the oil and gas products they have sold.

Why have plastic straws been targeted, but these companies haven't?


Banning straws is a step in the right direction, although it's more of a baby step. Will we as a country ever been able to take the jump to improvement we clearly need?

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https://www.pexels.com/photo/coffee-drink-starbucks-3597/

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