Best Whole Foods For Brain Health

9 Of The Best Whole Foods For Brain Health

How well our brain works

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We have all had days where we are just unable to concentrate on anything. Studies have shown that there is a definite relationship between what we put in our mouths and how well our brain works. Studies have also shown that eating a diet high in saturated fats causes a person to feel sluggish, lack energy and focus.

Even though there is no magic pill that we can take to help us concentrate on the tasks we need to complete, there are certain foods we can add to our diet that will help improve brain function.

1. Water

We all know our bodies need water to function properly, but studies have shown that dehydration can cause brain tissue to shrink. Studies have also shown that dehydration impairs short-term memory, focus and decision making.

2. Beets

Studies have shown that eating beets actually increases the blood flow to your brain, which, will improve brain function!

3. Oysters

Oysters are high in zinc and iron, which are vital for proper brain function. Studies have shown that a lack of zinc and iron in a person's diet can result in poor concentration, in an ability to recall things that have happened, as well as many other problems throughout the entire body.

4. Eggs

Eggs have gotten a bad reputation lately and although it is true that too much of a good thing can be harmful, adding eggs to your diet is great for brain function. The reason is that eggs are full of B-12, which helps to fight against atrophy (the natural shrinking of the brain as we age). The yolk of the egg is full of choline, which is a building block of brain cells and it has been proven that choline can help greatly improve your memory.

5. Berries

Berries are often referred to as super foods because many of them contain fisetin and flavonoid, which help to improve your memory. Blueberries have been shown to help improve motor skills, as well as learning capacity.

6. Nuts and seeds

Nuts and seeds are full of Omega's 3 and 6, folate, vitamins B6 and E, all of which help you to think more clearly. Some also contain magnesium and thiamine which are great for cognitive function as well as memory.

7. Leafy Greens

We all know we should eat our leafy greens every day and here is just one more reason we should. Leafy Greens contain B6, B12, and folate. They also contain high levels of iron and it has been proven that if you do not get enough iron your cognitive activity will slow down significantly. Leafy greens include Kale, spinach, chard, and greens.

8. Fish

If you want to reduce your risk of getting Alzheimer's Disease you can start with eating two servings of fish per week. The reason is that fish contain high levels of omega 3 and omega 3 coats the neurons in the brain allowing them to move easily. Omega 3 also allows the brain to get more oxygen, retain new information, as well as recall old information. Herring, Salmon, and Tuna are the best fish you can eat to help with brain function.

9. Broccoli

Broccoli is also a great whole food for a healthy brain. Broccoli has been proven to improve memory, as well as slow the aging process of the brain.

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The Unspoken Dangers of 'Mukbang' Culture

Ever wondered why you can't stop clicking on these addictive, self-made eating shows?

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Unless you've been living under a rock for the past five years, you've probably heard of the internet trend commonly referred to as a mukbang, or "eating show." These self-produced video clips typically involve one hungry individual, their filming device, and an obscene amount of delicious foods.

Though these broadcasts originated all the way from South Korea (hence the foreign vocabulary), the growing popularity of eating videos has taken the internet by storm. Nowadays as you scroll through YouTube, you'll find an outrageous amount of uploads with titles like "10,000 CALORIE PASTA MUKBANG," "EATING EVERYTHING ON THE MCDONALD'S MENU," or "THE ULTIMATE CHOCOLATE CHALLENGE."

Popular 'mukbangers' such as Peggie Neo, Megan McCullom, and Steven Sushi have made a sizable profit off of their viral eating shows, some collecting tens of thousands of dollars in revenue.

So, what's the big deal you say? You order a large quantity of food, indulge in said food, film yourself completing this menial task, and upload to the internet for money and fame. On the outside, this may seem like a luxurious lifestyle, but behind the camera lens sits an individual battling their own demons and influencing the world of social media to partake in their harmful behaviors.

Mukbanger Livia Adams ("Alwayshungry" on YouTube) has opened up about her unhealthy relationship with food in the past, praising herself for fasting several hours in order to justify her over-indulgence on camera.

Similarly, internet sensation Trisha Paytas claims to diet and starve herself for weeks just to be able to satisfy her subscribers with epic mukbangs, which are essentially binges.

In all actuality, these social media celebrities are negatively impacting (and possibly triggering) vulnerable viewers.

Many fans only see the highlight reel of YouTubers shoveling bowls of cereal or boxes of doughnuts into their mouths, yet remain completely unaware of what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. Messages saying:

"I'm on a diet... watching this is giving me some sort of satisfaction, like as tho I ate, you know?"
"I watch these videos because I know I physically can't afford to eat like this because I gain weight too easily."
"When having an eating disorder, watching Trisha's mukbangs is sorta comforting in a way omg"

flood the comments sections of Paytas' videos. Quite obviously, fans young and old are heavily influenced by this content and continue to support these creators to fulfill a self-destructive need.

Additionally, famous mukbang accounts never seem to include the painful after-effects of their ginormous feasts in videos. Fitness model Stephanie Buttermore flaunts her slim physique just days after consuming over 10,000 calories for a challenge, giving the impression that her previous overindulgence had no repercussions on her health whatsoever. Because Buttermore is a trained, athletic young woman, she was able to quickly bounce back after a series of workouts and low-calorie meals.

On the contrary, if a sedentary woman of about the same age were to attempt this challenge, she would most likely feel sluggish, irritable, bloated, stomach discomfort, and even vomitous post challenge. Eating regularly like this could lead to bigger issues such as heart disease, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and certain types of cancer. Unfortunately, because topics like these aren't glamorous and attractive to subscribers, mukbangers often edit them out.

Now don't get me wrong. Though not everyone who uploads a mukbang to the internet has an eating disorder or an evil agenda, they have to realize the kind of audience they're appealing to. This generation is more susceptible than ever to emulate the actions and words of their favorite celebrities. Young boys and girls look up to successful adults, and influencers should be remembered for the change they inspired, not the disease they encouraged.

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Food I Loved As A Kid That I Still Shamelessly Enjoy

(If something has a face or a shape, it somehow tastes 10x better.)

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Being a kid was the best: I was able to order from the simple, yet delicious, kids menu, while also having the capability of eating as much kid-friendly junk as I pleased without worrying about developing Type 2 Diabetes. Nevertheless, even though I'm almost 20, I still will never decline a pack of Scooby Doo fruit snacks or some dinosaur-shaped chicken nuggets. It's fair to say that my palate has not changed too much over the past two decades. Even though I do get judged at work for eating my PB & J with the crusts cut off, I'd like to think that there's a bit of "kid" left in all of us. So, here are 26 foods/snacks that I loved as a kid, and definitely still love now.

1. Apple Sauce

Preferably cinnamon flavored.

2. Apples and peanut butter

3. Baby carrots

4. Bean and cheese burritos

I occasionally dare to add rice to my bean + cheese burrito now.

5. Cheese pizza

6. Cheeto Puffs

7. Circus Animal Cookies

8. Dino Nuggets

If you don't like Dino nuggets, I'm convinced you're a robot imposter.

9. Fruit Roll-ups/Fruit By the Foot

10. Fruit Snacks

The blue ones were always the best.

11. Grilled cheese

A classic.

12. Jamba Juice

The acidity and sugar content of the drink may destroy my adult mouth, but I still cannot resist once in awhile.

13. Jell-O

14. Juice boxes

15. Mac 'n Cheese

16. Mini cereal boxes

Pops and Frosted Flakes were my favorites.

17. Mini pizzas 

From the one and only Trader Joe's.

18. Pasta with butter and parmesan (shaped!)

My favorite shapes are wagon wheels, and tennis rackets (had them once in France years ago).

19. PB & J

Preferably with the crust cut off.

20. Peanut butter pretzels

Another Trader Joe's favorite.

21. Peppermint Jojo's

And another one.

22. Pigs in a blanket

23. Pirate's Booty

24. Smiley fries

25. String cheese

26. Tater Tots

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