Best Whole Foods For Brain Health

9 Of The Best Whole Foods For Brain Health

How well our brain works

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We have all had days where we are just unable to concentrate on anything. Studies have shown that there is a definite relationship between what we put in our mouths and how well our brain works. Studies have also shown that eating a diet high in saturated fats causes a person to feel sluggish, lack energy and focus.

Even though there is no magic pill that we can take to help us concentrate on the tasks we need to complete, there are certain foods we can add to our diet that will help improve brain function.

1. Water

We all know our bodies need water to function properly, but studies have shown that dehydration can cause brain tissue to shrink. Studies have also shown that dehydration impairs short-term memory, focus and decision making.

2. Beets

Studies have shown that eating beets actually increases the blood flow to your brain, which, will improve brain function!

3. Oysters

Oysters are high in zinc and iron, which are vital for proper brain function. Studies have shown that a lack of zinc and iron in a person's diet can result in poor concentration, in an ability to recall things that have happened, as well as many other problems throughout the entire body.

4. Eggs

Eggs have gotten a bad reputation lately and although it is true that too much of a good thing can be harmful, adding eggs to your diet is great for brain function. The reason is that eggs are full of B-12, which helps to fight against atrophy (the natural shrinking of the brain as we age). The yolk of the egg is full of choline, which is a building block of brain cells and it has been proven that choline can help greatly improve your memory.

5. Berries

Berries are often referred to as super foods because many of them contain fisetin and flavonoid, which help to improve your memory. Blueberries have been shown to help improve motor skills, as well as learning capacity.

6. Nuts and seeds

Nuts and seeds are full of Omega's 3 and 6, folate, vitamins B6 and E, all of which help you to think more clearly. Some also contain magnesium and thiamine which are great for cognitive function as well as memory.

7. Leafy Greens

We all know we should eat our leafy greens every day and here is just one more reason we should. Leafy Greens contain B6, B12, and folate. They also contain high levels of iron and it has been proven that if you do not get enough iron your cognitive activity will slow down significantly. Leafy greens include Kale, spinach, chard, and greens.

8. Fish

If you want to reduce your risk of getting Alzheimer's Disease you can start with eating two servings of fish per week. The reason is that fish contain high levels of omega 3 and omega 3 coats the neurons in the brain allowing them to move easily. Omega 3 also allows the brain to get more oxygen, retain new information, as well as recall old information. Herring, Salmon, and Tuna are the best fish you can eat to help with brain function.

9. Broccoli

Broccoli is also a great whole food for a healthy brain. Broccoli has been proven to improve memory, as well as slow the aging process of the brain.

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10 Things People Ask Me About My Brumotactillophobia

These are the questions that I always hear when someone finds out that I can't stand my food touching.

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Brumotactillophobia is the fear of food touching other food. Yes, it is weird, but I recently found out that I am not the only one with this disorder. As I can imagine, I am probably not the only sufferer who - when someone finds out about it - have heard these common questions:

1. Why can't you have your food touch?

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That reason is: I have no idea. For as long as I can remember, the thought of it all just disgusts me. I did do some research on this disorder, however, and found that it is actually a common and mild form of OCD. It mostly stems in children of a young age, because they typically feel as though their plate is the only thing that they can control.

2. You know that your food ends up in the same place, right?

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As a matter of fact, yes, I do. I know what happens to food after you eat it, and I don't care. It can go to the same place in the end, but it will get there separately.

3. What do you do at buffets or Thanksgiving?

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I do what everyone else does: I eat. Just because I separate my food, doesn't mean I am not eating what is there. If I happen to have to go back for seconds because I didn't have enough room on my first plate for everything, then I will.

4. Don't you put gravy on mashed potatoes?

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First of all, I love gravy and mashed potatoes. It doesn't weird me out because gravy is a sauce, and sauces go on your foods. It's like ketchup or other condiments.

5. What about foods like salads or casseroles?

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To answer, foods that belong together go together. I don't know why that is okay for me, but it is. For instance, Shepherd's Pie is meat and vegetables mixed together with mashed potatoes on top and cooked in the oven. If those ingredients were separated onto a plate as a meal, I wouldn't mix them, but the fact that they are already mixed as it's own food, then it is okay with me.

6. What makes it weird for you to mix your plate together?

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To be frank, I have no idea. Some sufferers have a thing for the textures, others with taste. Personally, I have yet to pinpoint what it is about it that freaks me out.

7. What happens if the juice from one food touches another?

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Nope. Not today. I will literally stop eating and just go hungry.

8. What happens if some of your food does touch?

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If this unfortunate event happens, I typically try to eat around the parts that have touched and throw the contaminated parts away.

9. Does this mean you're a picky eater?

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Absolutely not! I might be picky about the layout of my plate, but I am a true foodie. I can eat pretty much anything.

10. Is that the only eating quirk you have?

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On top of not liking my food touch, I also have to eat one item at a time, and it usually from least favorite to favorite. For example, say I had a plate with steak, potatoes, and broccoli on it. I would probably eat it in the order of all of the broccoli, all of the potatoes, and then the steak.

Yeah, it is all very weird, but I don't mind. I know there are others out there like me, so here's to all of the people who suffer from Brumotactillophobia.

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I'm A Meat-Eater Who Thinks That Vegetarianism Is The Way Forward

The philosophy of vegetarianism is not about animals, it's about humans.

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I'm a bad person, and I love my steak, and yes, I hate PETA, too.

Let me tell you that PETA kills animals and not for their own justified humane reasons. According to one man, they've kidnapped a dog. And their brand of promoting vegetarianism simply isn't the right way to go about it, for reasons I feel are unnecessary to explain.

But, they do have a point. I think they just do a terrible job of explaining those points. Arguments for vegetarianism are really not just "eating meat is evil," or "think about the mothers of the cows you're eating." No, going vegan or vegetarian is really a conversation about our deeply held social norms and the inconsistencies of the answers regarding the treatment of animals, humans included.

Back in 2014, an Indiana man murdered his ex-girlfriend and proceeded to cook her brain, heart, and lung. While the man was held in police custody, PETA sent acting Clark County Sheriff Meyer, a peculiar letter: provide him exclusively vegan meals. For some, this would be a punishment, "don't you dare take away my meat." But for others like the Sheriff, the letter "[was] an insult" — as if to equate animal meat-eating with human meat eating — and this is exactly the point that PETA makes. Eating human-meat is equivalent to eating non-human-animal-meat.

One instinctively would think that is a crazy proposal. Why? Well, it is just wrong to eat humans, no doubt about it. Why is it wrong to eat humans, though? I'm just as good as a source of protein and nutrients as you are. If we remove all constructed norms aside, you are fair game, like the cows on the fields are.

A little sidetrack: humans have eaten other humans in the past—and there was nothing wrong about it. Humans throughout society would eat other prisoners of war and the Aztecs systematically slaughtered humans to be sacrificed to the gods and eaten. What changed? Well, we developed a system where we could grow an abundance of food, a system where humans would be significantly less valuable as food and significantly more valuable as producers of food.

Agriculture gave us a choice other than eating humans, and we chose the better option, not eating humans. Still, that doesn't tell us why it's wrong to eat humans. It's wrong to eat other humans because you are my equal. All humans are equal. Whether you're a male or female, gay or straight, immigrant or citizen, tall or short, old or young, and the list goes on. There's no difference, no one is more superior or less inferior.

But, let me make a distinction here. Equality doesn't mean everyone should be treated the same way, that would be absurd. Have you ever heard about a movement campaigning for the right of a man to get an abortion? No, but maybe you would want to campaign for a man's right to additional paternity leave. Equality means equal consideration, meaning that women should have the right to choose what they want to do with their bodies, as this gives consideration to the fact that women have a womb, while men don't.

So, why shouldn't I eat you? Because eating you means that I think that you have some feature that allows me to slaughter, cook, and consume you. This certain feature means that you are less deserving of not being eaten and cooked and consumed. This feature might be your skin color, or hair texture, or your accent. And if you think that no rational human would consider those features as contenders of being eaten and cooked and consumed, think again.

White slaveholder Americans never ate their slaves, not on a widespread reported basis at least. But the white slaveholder did think the slaves had a certain feature that justified their enslavement and brutal punishment. Here are the features to be a slave: you must have dark skin, curly hair, and a non-settler accent. These features are the qualifications to be a slave, and the definition of being a slave means that I do not have to treat you like a human. And when it did come to life-or-death situations, these features did lead white slaveholders to eat their slaves, first.

The Civil Rights and Feminist movements showed the world why being an African-American or an American woman why they are just as human as the white American male. You cannot pick features x, y, and z and have those features explain why those disqualify one from being treated equally.

Why don't we choose intelligence as a feature for superiority? That means the world would be enslaved to Neil deGrasse Tyson. But why Neil deGrasse Tyson as a standard, specifically? Couldn't we choose another standard of intelligence, say the IQ of Albert Einstein or Stephen Hawking? We cannot decisively draw a line to say, "this is superior" and "this is not". When the white slaveholder was trying to decide what made a slave, it was rather difficult to draw the line saying "you must be this dark to qualify as a slave." Indeed, "colored" and "not-colored" proved to be a difficult distinction. Some states passed one-drop of African blood laws... meaning of course, that every single living human on earth qualifies to be a slave.

Which is why it is questionable when we tell ourselves that we are "superior" to non-human animals. The reason we can eat non-human animals is apparently because we have features x, y, and z which non-human animals do not. We tell ourselves that we're more intelligent and that we can think rationally. Well, dolphins got echolocation, and we don't. I think they're more superior since we've only developed sonar technologies in the last century, while they've had that for 40 million years. Bats aren't blind, but they can see better in the dark, and some species can even detect ultraviolet light — while we can't. For whatever single feature we try to come up with to make the argument why we are superior, there will be another feature telling us we aren't.

If we can't find any feature that makes us objectively more superior, then non-human animals are equal to human animals, a case made by Australian philosopher Peter Singer's "All Animals Are Equal." What is that uniting factor, that all animals share, that can render all animals (including humans) equal? All animals feel pain. It doesn't matter to what degree they feel pain, but all animals feel pain, and would not want to feel pain. If we have a duty to spare an African-American from the brutality of slavery, then we have a duty to spare the chicken from a life of incarceration and torture.

I still eat meat, and yes, I have tried to stop eating meat. But it is so hard. We have the option to abandon meat because we have the 21st-century resources to abandon meat unlike the days of Aztec cannibalism. That is why I say, "I'm a bad person," and it is alright to say that. And I mean that, not in the sinister "I ate my mom for breakfast" kind of way, but rather as a type of acknowledgment. It is an acknowledgment that I eat meat because culture and norms say that meat tastes good, just like the culture and norms of the past said that slavery was alright because they are not humans, or that women can't vote because their place is in the kitchen.

We probably won't stop eating meat in this century. But the conversations about vegetarianism are conversations about the way our society treats its animals — as where George Orwell's pigs modify the features, "all animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others."

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