Fiction: Origin Legend of The World

Fiction: Origin Legend of The World

Native American Origin stories have inspired this piece about the world, and how it came to be. Walk through this short journey with a lonely crab and how he brings a new beginning.

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There was a crab living in the depths of the ocean floor. You could say he was the loneliest crab in the world. One day out of curiosity, the bright red crab crawls out of the ocean floor and steps onto the rocky land. For miles and miles away, there was no sign of life. No greenery, no animals, absolutely nothing. The crab was skeptical about the journey ahead, but his curiosity up and stumbled upon an oddly shaped rock. Afraid of a disaster, the crab did not touch the rock, instead, he analyzed the detail on it. After a few minutes, the crab realized it was an egg and an oddly placed egg for sure. The crab checked east and west for miles on end to find the owner, but alas there was no one. He changed direction and crawled north/south for hours, and yet there was no life to claim this egg.

"Hello!? Is this anyone's egg?", he called out.

There was still no answer to the call. The sun began to fade away into the ocean, and the crab has given up to find the owner of the misplaced egg. He had settled it down in a dark cave and began to continue his way home. The crab continued walking when brisk winds flew through his shell, sending shivers through his body. The crab felt guilty for leaving the lonely egg by itself, as he knew the feeling of loneliness all too well. He went back to the dark and cool cave to retrieve the egg and placed it on its shell, carrying it back to his ocean home. He cradled it with the little seaweed he had left and had fallen fast asleep as the moon began to rise.

***

The sun shone brightly that morning, the rays piercing the ocean bed. The crab awoke to the sunlight and had gone to check on the egg, only to notice it had gone missing. In a panic, the crab swims throughout his little home, only to find nothing. He immediately crawls out the ocean and onto the land. At the shoreline of the sea, he finds a broken shell piece and again finds another. The crab followed the trail of broken shell pieces to the original spot where the egg stood. He takes a peek inside the last shell and is found disappointing.

"Haha silly crab, over here!". He turns his attention to the sweet voice of an angel. Behind the green-like angel was a fully bloomed tree with luscious fruits to bare. The crab had seen nothing of this anomaly before and shrunk his being. The green angel laughed a sweet laugh and smiled, picking up the crab from the rocky ground.

Little crab, you are the sweetest crab. You had given me warmth and shelter from the cold world. I thank you-", as the words continued from her mouth, the grass grew, plants of all types blossomed, and everything had become beautiful. "Because of your sincerity little crab, I shall grant you one wish". She placed the crab on the ground and awaited his response.

He had thought for a while and said, "I would like some friends, Angel. I am very lonely", he said sadly. The angel listened and granted his wish. In no time, six different animals appeared in front of the crab: a horse, a mouse, a chick, a cat, a rabbit, and a tiger.

"I have granted your wish little crab, now you and your new friends must protect this Newfoundland and help it grow into majestic beauty". The animals had agreed and the green angel disappeared into a mist of thin air. This is the origin of the world and its protectors.



Disclaimer: This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, places, events, and incidents are either the products of the author's imagination or used in a fictitious manner. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental.

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The Coach That Killed My Passion

An open letter to the coach that made me hate a sport I once loved.
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I fell in love with the game in second grade.

I lived for every practice and every game. I lived for the countless hours in the gym or my driveway perfecting every shot, every pass, and every move I could think of. Every night after dinner, I would go shoot and would not allow myself to go inside until I hit a hundred shots. I had a desire to play, to get better and to be the best basketball player I could possibly be.

I had many coaches between church leagues, rec leagues, personal coaches, basketball camps, middle school, and high school. Most of the coaches I had the opportunity to play for had a passion for the game like I did. They inspired me to never stop working. They would tell me I had a natural ability. I took pride in knowing that I worked hard and I took pride in the compliments that I got from my coaches and other parents. I always looked forward to the drills and, believe it or not, I even looked forward to the running. These coaches had a desire to teach, and I had a desire to learn through every good and bad thing that happened during many seasons. Thank you to the coaches that coached and supported me through the years.

SEE ALSO: My Regrets From My Time As A College Softball Player

Along with the good coaches, are a few bad coaches. These are the coaches that focused on favorites instead of the good of the entire team. I had coaches that no matter how hard I worked, it would never be good enough for them. I had coaches that would take insults too far on the court and in the classroom.

I had coaches that killed my passion and love for the game of basketball.

When a passion dies, it is quite possibly the most heartbreaking thing ever. A desire you once had to play every second of the day is gone, it turns into dreading every practice and game. It turns into leaving every game with earphones in so other parents don't talk to you about it. It meant dreading school the next day due to everyone talking about the previous game. My passion was destroyed when a coach looked at me in the eyes and said, "You could go to any other school and start varsity, but you just can't play for me."

SEE ALSO: Should College Athletes Be Limited To One Sport?

Looking back now at the amount of tears shed after practices and games, I just want to say to this coach:

Making me feel bad about myself doesn't make me want to play and work hard for you, whether in the classroom or on the court. Telling me that, "Hard work always pays off," and not keeping that word doesn't make me want to work hard either. I spent every minute of the day focusing on making sure you didn't see the pain that I felt, and all of my energy was put towards that fake smile when I said I was OK with how you treated me. There are not words for the feeling I got when parents of teammates asked why I didn't play more or why I got pulled after one mistake, I simply didn't have an answer. The way you made me feel about myself and my ability to play ball made me hate myself, not only did you make me doubt my ability to play, but you also turned my teammates against me to where they didn't trust my abilities. I would not wish the pain you caused me on my greatest enemy. I pray that one day, eventually, when all of your players quit coming back that you realize that it isn't all about winning records. It's about the players.

You can have winning records without a good coach if you have a good team, but you won't have a team if you can't treat players with the respect they deserve.

SEE ALSO: To The Little Girl Picking Up A Basketball For The First Time


Cover Image Credit: Equality Charter School

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'Bird Box': Movie Vs. Book

The differences are more vast than you think.

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I read "Bird Box" about three years ago when my English teacher recommend it to me. Ever since then, it has been my favorite book. When I saw that Netflix was making it into a movie, I was overwhelmed with excitement. I watched "Bird Box" and was only slightly disappointed. There were two scenes that I absolutely needed to see but they never appeared, Malorie and Victor in the bar and actual birds raining down on Malorie and the children in the boat. Since movies and the books they are based on are always different, I decided to write about the biggest differences that I noticed. Some of which, include a lot of gore.

1. Microphones

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Tom had the idea to use microphones with an amp before he thought of the birds in a box. He actually found the birds in a box when he went on a supply run around the block they were living on. Malorie thought of his idea after the children were born and took Cheryl's car to get them. Ever since that day in the book, she had them set up so everything outside was amplified. This, of course, was when the birds were no longer there.

2. Tom

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Tom had a wife and a little girl named Robin. Robin was in eighth grade and was really smart for her age but she looked outside and Tom had found her in the bathtub with her wrists slit. He buried her in the backyard and later found George's house, which he, Don, and George resided and thought of solutions to this problem which was originally called the "Russia Report". George had the idea of looking at them indirectly which he later found out was not a solution at all. In the movie, Tom had survived with Malorie and the children but in the book, he died when all of the other housemates died. Leaving Malorie to fend for herself and the children.

3. Tom and Malorie

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The movie shows Tom and Malorie in a relationship. But the book suggests that Malorie is the only one who has feelings for Tom. She longs for him, his voice, and his presence. But Tom is more concerned with being the leader of the house, although he has a kind tone towards Malorie.

4. Gore

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The book has way more gore than the movie, which is completely understandable why it didn't make the cut. There are scenes of the housemates blindly stepping on and running over dead bodies, finding dead bodies of families, and even found someone, dead, who had scooped their eyes out into a bowl on the table. The book also tells about news reports like a pair of old-lady twins who where biting people's faces off at a hospital that were shot by the police. Plus, the death scenes in the book were different from the movie, most likely because they are impossible and needed to been more real than what they were.

5. Deaths

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Shannon: She did not flip a car with a very pregnant Malorie in the passenger seat. Her and Malorie had been living in a house with blankets over the windows and while Malorie was downstairs watching the news, she called for Shannon who did not give a response. She walked upstairs to find Shannon had stabbed herself in the chest with a pair of scissors.

George: Although George did die watching the recording of the creatures, he did not bang his head on the floor. Instead, he tore his body through the rope that tied him to the chair and the book describes it as flesh ribbons.

The Housemates: All except Malorie died when Don removed the blankets from the windows and opened the doors.

Olympia: Although she did jump out of the attic window after giving birth, in the book, she hangs herself by her umbilical cord that she chewed off.

6. Gary

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The pictures that can be seen spread across the table are actually just notes in the book. Malorie steals Gary's briefcase that he brought with him and finds it. It had his ideas written in it stating that he believed people's reactions to the creatures were psychosomatic meaning that the insanity that follows from looking at them aren't the creatures but the result of dramatic people looking at them. He doesn't believe that the creatures make people go insane, they choose to go insane. The housemates cast him out after Malorie tells them about the journal but Don sneaked him to the cellar where he lived for about seven weeks, in solitude, feeding Don his philosophies. It was Don who originally pulled the blankets down and opened the doors, not Gary. However, Gary did enable this behavior.

7. Victor

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If you've read the book, this is probably the saddest part of it all. Victor is Jules' border collie who was locked in the cellar when the blankets were torn down. He survived with Malorie and went to the bar with her to fetch the microphones as her seeing eye dog. Except he saw a creature and it was then that Malorie knew animals were not immune. She listened as he snapped at the air and chewed off his leg. She had to leave him, she didn't have a choice.

8. Jane Tucker School For the Blind

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The safe haven Malorie and the children go to in the end, is a school for the blind. However, a lot of the residents had gouged their eyes out because it was the ultimate protection. Because they do not resort to this method, Malorie stays.

9. Supply Runs

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There were two supply runs that only consisted of Tom and Jules, not everyone. They found two huskies as seeing eye dogs and the bird box on the first run and the second run is when they went to the grocery store.

10. The Man on The River

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I think the purpose of this man is simply to make Malorie uneasy. He originally had a motorized boat and tried to convince Malorie to remove her blind fold and even got really close to the boat, but Malorie rowed away then got attacked by a pack of wolves.

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