Netflix's Adult Interactive Content Works, Here's Why

Netflix's Adult Interactive Content Works, Here's Why

Interactive content like "Bandersnatch" may be Netflix's new trend.

Mau
Mau
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Netflix first launched its interactive content back in April 2016, with the children's show "Kong: King of the Apes." This choose-your-own-adventure show and several other Netflix originals geared towards children had interactive elements but did not allow viewers to choose how the show progressed or ended. But, with the release of Black Mirror's "Bandersnatch," Netflix is working toward appealing to adult viewers with more complex interactive content.


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After watching "Bandersnatch" for the first time, I personally wanted to play it again to see which different pathway I face. "Bandersnatch" is about a young man named Stefan in 1980s London who creates a "choose your own adventure" video game called Bandersnatch, and Netflix viewers have the ability to control Stefan's actions to result in different endings. What makes content like this pleasurable is that you am in control of what happens next, which is something you can not gain from any other regular Netflix show. It can either last for 40 minutes, or 90 minutes depending on how far along you go. And what makes it even cooler is that when you play again, you learn more about the story and may get to the point of winning.

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Adult interactive content is more than selecting an option. It brings the viewer into the complexity of the show and keeps them engaged all throughout. This is why content like "Bandersnatch" is Netflix's best new marketing strategy. According to The Verge, "It paves the way for a new revenue stream that could be a lifeline for the streaming giant and a natural extension of its existing infrastructure." More competing streaming services, such as Disney+, are coming into existence so Netflix needs a new and fresh method to keep their subscriber and viewing numbers high.

I hope more interactive shows come out on Netflix because it was fun experiencing "Bandersnatch." This was a great move and I am ready for more exciting and innovative shows to appear on my Netflix feed.

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36 Rules Of Life From 'NCIS's' Leroy Jethro Gibbs

Sometimes we all need a smack on the back of the head.
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I have been watching "NCIS" since the show began back in 2003, and season 15 will be airing this September. It is one of the longest running series and for a good reason, even though a lot of your favorite characters die off in the show they somehow still keep it alive. Anyone who has watched an episode or more knows about the infamous Gibbs's rules. Here's the list that we can gather from the many episodes:

Rule 1: "Never let suspects stay together." - revealed in the Season 1 premiere episode, Yankee White (episode).

Rule 2: "Never screw over your partner." - revealed in the Season 4 episode, Blowback (episode). McGee also stated this rule to Ned Dorneget in Need to Know (episode). McGee also mentioned to Abigail Borin in Ships in the Night (episode) that rule number one has been taken twice, showing that he knows that there are two number one rules.

Rule 3: "Always wear gloves at a crime scene." - revealed in "Yankee White."

Rule 4: "Don't believe what you're told. Double check." - again revealed in "Yankee White."

Rule 5: "Never be unreachable." - revealed in the Season 3 episode, Deception (episode) although Gibbs has been known to be intentionally unreachable. The rule was shown in Rule Fifty-One (episode) in the background when Gibbs opens the box.

Rule 6: "The best way to keep a secret? Keep it to yourself. Second best? Tell one other person - if you must. There is no third best." - revealed in the Season 4 episode, Blowback (episode)

Rule 7: "You don't waste good." - revealed in the Season 8 episode, Baltimore (episode).

Rule 8: "Never say you're sorry. It's a sign of weakness." - This rule has been mentioned throughout the series, but it wasn't given a specific number until Flesh and Blood (episode). The rule is also a direct reference to John Wayne's catch phrase in "She Wore A Yellow Ribbon" (John Ford, Director). Wayne said: "Never apologize, mister, it's a sign of weakness." to subordinates in a military situation. DiNozzo notes the connection in Hiatus Part 1 (episode). Mark Harmon's career has paralleled John Wayne's. They both were quarterback of their southern California college football team, both went into acting. (Harmon's father, Tom Harmon, was a Heisman Trophy-winner and actor & announcer as well.) Note: This is continuously told to Tony, Ziva and Tim through a smack to the back of their heads.

Rule 9: "Always be specific when you lie." - revealed in the Season 1 finale episode, Reveille (episode).

Rule 10: "Never take anything for granted." - revealed in the Season 3 episode, Probie (episode) although Gibbs also quotes it as being "Never assume" during the Season 9 episode, Rekindled (episode).

Rule 11: "Never go anywhere without a knife." - revealed in the Season 1 episode, One Shot, One Kill (episode)although it's sometimes quoted as "Never leave home without a knife" or "Always carry a knife."

Rule 12: "Never get personally involved in a case." - revealed in the Season 7 episode, Obsession (episode) and again referenced by the new SECNAV Clayton Jarvis in the Season 9 premiere episode, Nature of the Beast (episode) as the number one rule in Washington politics.

Rule 13: "When the job is done, walk away." - revealed in the Season 6 episode, Semper Fidelis (episode).

Rule 14: "Never date a co-worker." - revealed in the Season 1 episode, Enigma (episode).

Rule 15: "Never, ever involve lawyers." - revealed in "Collateral Damage." Rule 51 is written on the back of the card containing Rule 13 in "Rule Fifty-One."

Rule 16: "Bend the line, don't break it." - revealed in Anonymous was a Woman (episode).

Rule 17: "Always work as a team." - revealed in Leap of Faith (episode).

Rule 18: "If someone thinks they have the upper hand, break it." - revealed in the Season 8 finale episode, Pyramid (episode).

Rule 19: "Never, ever interrupt Gibbs during an interrogation." - revealed in the Season 14 episode, Privileged Information (episode).

Rule 20: "It's better to seek forgiveness than ask permission." - revealed in Silver War (episode).

Rule 21: "Always look under." - revealed in The Artful Dodger (episode)

Rule 22: "Never ever bother Gibbs in interrogation." - revealed in Smoked (episode).

Rule 23: "Never mess with a Marine's coffee... if you want to live."- revealed during "Forced Entry."

Rule 24: "There are two ways to follow someone. First way, they never notice you. Second way, they only notice you." - Jack Knife (episode) and "Rule Fifty-One."

Rule 25: "When you need help, ask." - revealed during Blood Brothers (episode).

Rule 26: "Always watch the watchers." - revealed in "Baltimore."

Rule 27: "If you feel like you are being played, you probably are." - revealed in Nature of the Beast (episode).

Rule 28: "Your case, your lead." - revealed in Bounce (episode) placing Tony as temporarily in charge of the team, and also in Phoenix (episode) with Ducky as leader.

Rule 29: "There is no such thing as coincidence." - revealed in Obsession (episode) although DiNozzo states that Rule 39A is "There is no such thing as a small world" during Canary (episode).

Rule 30: "If it seems like someone is out to get you, they are." - revealed in Borderland (episode).

Rule 31: "Never accept an apology from someone who just sucker punched you." - revealed in Psych Out (episode).

Rule 32: "First things first, hide the women and children." - This rule number was mentioned in Patriot Down (episode) but was not stated until Rule Fifty-One (episode).

Rule 33: "Clean up the mess that you make." - revealed in "Rule Fifty-One" although it's also stated as "Never leave behind loose ends" in Hiatus Part 2 (episode).

Rule 34: "Sometimes you're wrong." - Created by Gibbs in Rule Fifty-One" by writing it on the back of the card containing Rule 13. It is unknown if his coworkers are aware of this rule.

Rule 35: "Always give people space when they get off an elevator." - revealed in Double Back (episode)

Rule 36: "Never trust a woman who doesn't trust her man." - revealed in Devil's Triangle (episode).



While some seem to deal with Gibbs only there are some very great life lessons present. If you haven's started watching "NCIS" I suggest you start soon, it is all on Netflix.

"A slap to the face is an insult - a slap to the back of the head is a wake-up call." Leroy Jethro Gibbs
Cover Image Credit: CBS TV / Twitter

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What Makes A 'Strong' Female Character? I Asked 10 Women To Name Their Heroines, From Hermione To Uhura

Ten women talk about their favorite female film characters.

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I remember the last action movie I watched. The title isn't important, but the lack of women in the film was. Of course, this is fairly normal for most films, the women in the film, if any, are delegated to love interest or mother roles. Not that those aren't important, they are, but these characters have barely any lines and are given the role of confusion or wonder "what are you doing? What about the kids? Why are you leaving us?" and then never seen or mentioned again. Not only do they lack depth, but if they're used as a plot device to add depth to the male character, it's not working… if you give the character a wife he should probably be talking about her.

Thus begins my journey of finding what makes a strong female character, and what actual women look for when looking for a believable character. I asked 10 women about their favorite women in film.

Tracy Turnblad from "Hairspray."

"Tracy is a character who wants nothing but her dream of becoming a dancer on TV. When she achieves that dream, she uses her platform and her white privilege to promote diversity during the civil rights-era, and she's a plus-sized girl who embraces her weight and there is no plot point involving weight loss. What's not to love?" — Ashtyn G.

The Women of the "Mamma Mia!" series.

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"I feel that it's really nice to see a huge female cast that are all different and powerful in their own way. Sophie is contemplating marriage and the whole time is on this hunt to find out who she is and forging her own path. In the end, she decides not to marry and she seems happier for it, and I think that's a very important normalization for women to see. Her mother, Donna, is being portrayed in having a crazy and fun past but also stepping out and taking care of her daughter and a company all on her own. She knows she can be frisky and fun but she also is able to support herself and others, rather than women having to choose one or the other. Also, Donna's friends Tanya and Rosie are completely and utterly badass. Rosie wrote her own book and is comfortable being alone and also completely herself with no shame. Tanya is super sexual and isn't seen as a slut, she loves to have fun and doesn't want to be tied down, this is unthinkable in today's era but in the movie it doesn't matter! The male characters are hilarious but are forced to live at the whims and woes of the women, it's their life and they aren't gonna let the men dictate them." — Madeline C.

Wonder Woman from "Wonder Woman."

Gal Gadot (Wonder Woman) in "Wonder Woman."

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"Wonder Woman is a great character because, although she is stronger than every man she comes across, she doesn't see herself as being any better than them, and she insists on finding the good in everyone." — Hannah B.
"Wonder Woman has a such a passion for humanity and doesn't see herself as wildly superior to them. She uses her strength and wits to solve problems instead of turning to someone else for help. However, when she asks for help she doesn't have to 'swallow her pride' like a man would." — Isabel M.

Hermione Granger in the "Harry Potter" series.

Emma Watson (Hermione) in "Harry Potter."

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"I think she's a great character and a good example of a woman in film because she was more than just a love interest for another character, which is quite common for female roles. She was smart, brave, and strong which they showed throughout the series. She also wasn't the stereotypical 'super-feminine' girl either, which to me is nice and refreshing to see, since not every girl is like that." — Lexi W.

Meryl Steep in Anything and Everything.

"Meryl Streep has always embodied a strong, free willed and confident character that many people such as myself look up to. She has never faltered in believing in herself and her ability to take on the best diversity of roles, and that's what I appreciate most about her." — Hannah R.

Ellen Ripley from the "Alien" series.

"Ripley is one of the most badass female film characters. She is intelligent, strong, and in charge- everything that many women in film are not allowed to be. I like that she isn't traditionally feminine and that she is respected even though she totally differs from the norm." — Abby D.

Uhura from the "Star Trek" series.

"Uhura is an inspirational character. Not only was she a woman in a cast of mainly male characters, she was on the main crew, not just in the background. She was a strong female character in sci-fi too, which is a genre where you don't see a lot of females in lead roles. Another fun fact about the character is that the original Star Trek series debuted in 1966, so she was one of the first POC to be cast in a 'non-menial' role, which makes it all the more impressive considering she was also a woman of color." — Caroline B.

Raphina from "Sing Street."

Lucy Boynton (Raphina) in "Sing Street."

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"I really love Raphina because she's a very real and honest character - she has a bad home life and while she appears to cover it up by her edgy appearance, when she becomes close to Conor we see how imperfect her life really is. Despite all this, she still dreams of being a professional model in London, which is very inspiring, the way she doesn't let her unfortunate situation make her hopeless." — Jillian J.

Shuri from "Black Panther."

Letitia Wright (Shuri) in "Black Panther."

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"Shuri is the teenage mastermind behind all of the inventions and innovations of Wakanda. She faces criticism for her age, but it doesn't stop her quick wit and quicker mind. She's not only the brains on Wakanda, but also a strong, courageous, supportive, and protective sister and warrior. Shuri is a fantastic example of a woman and a great role model, especially for young women of color." — Annika B.

So, what do these women have in common? They don't seem the same… most don't associate Donna from "Mamma Mia!" with Shuri from "Black Panther." But all of these women have goals, wants, needs, flaws, and are seen as just regular people. They're strong in their own way. Tracy Turnblad may not have beaten anyone up, but she stands up for what she believes in.

"Strong female character" is a great trope, but shouldn't be reserved for the women who simply shoot a few guys in an action film. These women are strong in their own way, and it's what all filmmakers should focus on when writing and creating women for the screen.

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