I'm Still Optimistic About the Lions' Future, Hear Me Out

I'm Still Optimistic About the Lions' Future, Hear Me Out

Against all common sense, I still believe that Lions have a successful future ahead of them in the years to come.

162
views

The Detroit Lions have been a record-breakingly awful team for the majority of its history. The Lions are only one of four teams who have not only never won a Super Bowl, but haven't even BEEN to the Super Bowl. And it isn't like they have even come close to that - the Lions have never won a playoff game since 1992. With failure after failure of players and coaches, they can just never seem to get it right. The Lions were the first team to record the 0-16 winless season back in 2008. Even though history doesn't show up any hope, with a new coach, GM, and players, they might just have a chance to be above average instead of just average.

1. Matt Patricia 

Matt Patricia has worked alongside one of the greatest coaches of our generation, if not all time, in Bill Belichick. Belichick has led the Patriots to five Super Bowl victories and eight Super Bowl Appearances. The Lions need someone leading them who is familiar with a winning culture and strategy. While Patricia hasn't been excellent this season, he is still adjusting to being a head coach instead of a defensive coordinator, and he is still getting used to his players. I think his knowledge of how to win will serve the Lions well in the long run.

2. Bob Quinn

Bob Quinn is also an ex-Patriot that has been a great addition to our system as GM. Quinn has substantially upped our quality of players that we draft, getting us players like Kerryon Johnson and Kenny Golladay, who both have potential to be this team's future superstars. Also with Additions like Jarrad Davis, Frank Ragnow, Taylor Decker, and Graham Glasgow, Quinn understands the importance of the player who plays in the trenches as well. Quinn knows we have to win at the line of scrimmage, which is something this team has lacked.

3. Kerryon Johnson

Kerryon Johnson was the team's second-round pick out of Auburn in 2018. The Lions desperately needed help in the run game, given the fact they had not had a 100-yard rusher since 2013. Kerryon gifted us with 100 yards against the Patriots, which is an accomplishment that gives me hope that he could be the savior running back this team has been waiting for. After the failures of Abdullah, Leshoure, Best, and other recent running back draft pick that turned into busts, Kerryon looks like he has the potential to be the superstar we need in this position.

4. Kenny Golladay

Kenny Golladay has the unfortunate circumstance of coming to the team after Calvin Johnson was here. Megatron has raised the city's expectations for what a wide receiver should be. Since filling in the Hall of Famer's role, Golladay has had some very impressive catches that have shown us his superstar potential. He has the same ability as CJ to be able to make those crazy catches while being triple teamed and also being a great route runner.

5. Defense

Darius Slay has been the biggest superstar on the Lion's defense for the last few years. Slay had 8 interceptions in 2017 and went on to the Pro Bowl that year, as well as this year. Alongside Slay is Glover Quin, who is a also a veteran defensive back with Slay. The newcomers like Jarrad Davis, Devon Kennard, and Damon "Snacks" Harrison, have added more playmakers and depth into this defense. Looking ahead, the Lions will need some ore improvement on the defensive line, but as far as linebackers and defensive backs go, the Lions have pretty good talent.

6. The fans

The Detroit Lions fans have gone through hard time after hard time with this team. You can't even say ups and downs because there really hasn't been any ups. My family has had season to the Lions games for years, and we still continue to go year after year, just to get our hearts broken again. The Sunday tradition of being angry after losing can be turned into fuel to get your homework done, though. The Lions fans still show up the Ford Field every Sunday, just as enthused as ever, that this year could be the year of the Lions.

Popular Right Now

Why College Athletes Should Not Be Paid

Dont they already get enough?
136438
views

Throughout the years big name college athletes have been trying to get six-digit numbers in their bank account before making it to the pros. What they do not understand is that college is not a place of work and that it is meant to further education for a future career. Also, no college, big or small, has enough money to pay them. They have to pay to build facilities, pay coaches, give scholarships, and pay athletic directors to make sure that the school has the best chance of winning. Despite the fact that most athletes do not have money to get by while they are in college, schools do not gain enough revenue back from the money that they put into their sports programs. They are technically already paid with a free education due to their scholarship, and all of the different sports would not be able to be paid the same amount.

If colleges were to pay their athletes, there would not be as much money to go around for any of the other things like the facilities or the coaches. Not only do colleges not have enough money, but it would also defeat the purpose of going to school. If athletes were to start getting paid, it would give people a reason to talk about paying other students in the school. “If we pay the athletes maybe we should also do it for the first violinist in the school orchestra, or the lead actor in theatrical productions, and perhaps popular professors should allocate course enrollment slots to those students who bid the highest" according to Andrew Zimbalist of theatlantic.com. It would also make the cost of college more expensive. The money would have to come from somewhere. That would just make it harder for a regular student to attend a college. According to star.txstate.edu, it would be really unfair to the other students. Some if not all college athletes are already on scholarships, so why should they be paid like they are professionals? Many college athletes argue that since they do not have time to get jobs that they should be paid by the university so that they can have extra money to spend. What they do not realize is that the average college student is middle class and has to pay their way through school. It is not that since they do not play a sport they have money to spend. These students would kill to have their school paid for and all they would have to worry about is their grades.

It would really ruin the culture of college sports. College students love college sports because the athletes are students just like they are. The athletes are in classes and are seen on campus. They are a part of the school's community. Money would separate the athletes from the student body. It would make them seem like they are the most important people at the school.

Another thing is that some athletes do not stay in school the four years to earn their degrees, so they will take up classroom space for one or two years and it is free. Some athletes don't even deserve the education that they are being given. For example, the valedictorian of my high school class really wanted to go to Georgetown. She got in, but tuition was over $75,000 a year, yet there are athletes that go to this school for free and probably do not have the grades to even be there. Former NBA star Allen Iverson who barely graduated high school and will tell you himself that he hated school, got to go to Georgetown for free, and he only stayed for one year.

Forbes.com was also able to bring up some good points. Football and basketball are the two sports that most people think of when it comes to athletes being paid. What about the other sports? Athletes participate in sports like soccer, tennis, golf, baseball, volleyball, track and field. They work just as hard as football and basketball players, but just because they do not generate as much money they have to be treated differently than the people that work out in the same facilities as they do. Even if it were possible for athletes to be paid they should all be paid the same. Some people claim that football and men's basketball should be the only sports to be paid because those are the sports that generate the bulk of the revenue. This would be violating the federal Title IX law. This law stipulates equal compensation for male and female athletes. Besides the issue of paying the participants of every sport, there is also the issue of everyone being paid — should you just pay your elite athletes or the whole team? How much would you pay players? Is it one set amount for every athlete, or will there be pro-like contracts? If you let athletes get paid for endorsements, will it give some programs unfair advantages? If someone plays for a school like Alabama they are more likely to get an endorsement than if they were playing for a school like Tulsa. It is the same issue with allowing profit off merchandise sold with their name or number. Playing for Florida would give a better opportunity to make a profit off of merchandise than playing for Western Michigan.

Also, imagine a coach trying to discipline a college player if they were paid. Even if they know they messed up all they would care about is the money. Paying them would affect their character and it would affect the way they act if they were to go out in the real world and play professionally. College teaches you about life and tells you to be disciplined. It is hard to be disciplined when you are getting paid a lot of money.

One thing that may surprise the reader of this paper is that most colleges, even the big name ones, do not even make the money back that they put into their sports programs. Despite all the tickets, merchandise, and memorabilia that these big name universities sell, they cannot break even. According to theatlantic.com, the average FBS athletic program ran a $9.44 million operating deficit. This brings up the question where would the money come from?

While researching on forbes.com only 14 athletic programs are generating a profit without having to rely on institutional support like student fees. Ohio state university needs over $22 million from the booster club in order to balance. OSU could ask the boosters for money to pay the players, but what would a school like Western Kentucky do? They already spend 5.6 million on grants-in-aid and it takes 8.2 million from the university to balance their budget. How would they pay their players?

One thing that shocked me while I was doing research on thestate.com was that the athletes that are basically impoverished receive a federal supplement every semester. It is called Pell Grant money. Qualified college athletes receive up to $5,645 put in their bank accounts a year. The athlete can choose to spend this money in any way they want. So it is pretty much up to them to be smart with it and not blow it on something stupid. This money is meant to help athletes from impoverished backgrounds live like average students without hardship.

Dawn Staley, the South Carolina women's basketball coach grew up in the Philadelphia projects. She earned a full scholarship to Virginia where she qualified for the maximum amount of Pell Grant money. “Things came up. I didn't have much when I went to school. When you see other people with things, you're a kid, you want them. If you don't have them, you don't feel like you're having the full experience of being in college." Staley's example from two decades ago still applies today. The athletes that need it the most are taken care of through Pell Grants. They do not need the extra money. These grants are distributed based on the annual income of an athlete's family. The lower the income the higher the grant.

Most fans of college sports do not know that the NCAA allows for additional help to athletes through the student athlete opportunity fund. It is intended to provide direct benefits to student athletes or their families as determined by conference officers. Some of the benefits include non-athletics related health expenses that are not covered by an athlete's insurance plan, travel expenses for an athlete to attend funerals or family emergencies, and a $200 annual clothing allowance, as long as Pell Grants are available.

A big reason college athletes should not be paid is simply because they are not professionals. College athletes are people that are trying to get to the pros and therefore, are not paid because they have not made it yet. Since these players are in college, they should never be paid to play their sport. College sports are just like another class. College students pick something that they want to major in so that they can learn and start a career. College sports should be treated the same way. “I am a broadcast journalism major and no one pays me to set up interviews, anchor a show or broadcast on the college radio station, U92 FM. The reason why no one pays me to do any of that is because I am learning my field in order to get paid when I get a job. In college sports you play to get to the pros, not to earn a paycheck as a student." says Josh Cooper of bdlsports.net. What people forget about college athletes is that they are student athletes. The word student comes before athlete. No one in college gets paid to get an A+ or pass an important test. College is a place where you learn to grow up and how to manage your life.

The biggest reason why college athletes should not be paid is that having a scholarship is technically a form of pay. No, the athlete does not get that money to spend on whatever they want, but the most important thing is paid for. The average college student would kill to have their school already paid for. Not only does a college athlete have a chance to go pro in a sport but they have a chance to finish a degree, which can be used if the pros do not go as planned.

While reading an article by John Rocker from wind.com I discovered that college athletes also have the opportunity to meet the boosters of the schools that they play for. A school's boosters club is made up of alumni that give a lot of money to the school. They most likely own their own businesses. This is another job opportunity for an athlete. If the pros do not work out the booster could remember the athlete's buzzer beater against their rival and give them a job.

In closing, there are too many questions that need to be answered and too many issues that would arise from college athletes getting paid. A college athlete has a ton of privileges and opportunities. There is no reason why they should be paid. Their school is free, they have a chance of getting a job if the pros don't work out and there is just not enough money to go around.

Cover Image Credit: YouTube
Cover Image Credit: Post and Courier

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

What Bryce Harper's Insane Contract Means For Other Big Timers In The MLB

Large sums of money cause large sums of conversation throughout the league.

248
views

After finally reaching a deal with the Philadelphia Phillies, which is composed of a humble $330 million, Bryce Harper has stirred up a great amount of chatter throughout the MLB.

After seeing the negotiations pan out between the Philadelphia club and the star outfielder, experts started asking what this agreement will mean for the other big names in baseball. Although Harper was not the only one to receive an insane deal, with Manny Machado signing with the San Diego Padres for $300 million after two consecutive World Series appearances with the Dodgers, his stood out the most.

As soon as Harper declared free-agency, all eyes were on him and where he would end up for the 2019 season. The months of speculations and predictions ended abruptly with a shocking sum of money promised to the outfielder from a Phillies team that had a sub-par season in 2018. Soon after, all eyes were on Mike Trout, the Los Angeles Angels star, who is nearing the end of his time with the Los Angeles club.

Trout had by far the most impressive and successful personal season in all of the MLB in 2018. His power at the plate and speed in the outfield set him apart from nearly everyone in the league. However, the Angels' lack of success held Trout back from being in the spotlight.

As his time comes to an end with the struggling club, Trout is a top prospect for many clubs. There has even been chatter of Harper "recruiting" Trout to Philly for the 2020 season. However, Harper's extreme deal should give hope to Trout. There is no sign of clubs being frugal with their budget on these big-ticket players and that will remain true for the star outfielder.

Related Content

Facebook Comments