6 Highlights From The 2018 Winter Olympics (So Far)

6 Highlights From The 2018 Winter Olympics (So Far)

"I owe this medal a lot to [Reese Witherspoon] and to my mom. But, like, more to Reese in a way, ya know? Because she has more followers on Instagram."
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The Olympics only happen every four years and they are arguably the highlight of those years. It's the one time that a varied field of events are celebrated and broadcasted on national television. Although they aren't over yet, there already have been a lot of memorable moments.

1. Red Gerard winning the first gold medal for the U.S. and swearing on live TV.

NBC might regret microphoning athletes after this one. The first U.S. gold medal was handed out on the second day of events to one of the youngest American Olympians this year. Red Gerard won the gold in Men's Slopestyle, but almost missed the event. Gerard nearly overslept after binge-watching Brooklyn Nine-Nine, lost his ski jacket, and was deducted heavily for his first two runs for falling.

He nailed his third run to clinch the gold and then dropped an f-bomb on live TV. He admitted that his entire family was enjoying themselves on the sidelines and spent a lot of their day shotgunning beers. It does not get any more American than that.

2. Anything Adam Rippon did.

If you haven't heard yet, it's twenty-gay-teen and what way to celebrate with the first openly gay, American Olympian. This is Rippon's first time at the Olympics and he has already made a name for himself by helping Team USA secure the bronze in the figure skating team event.

He also has shaded Mike Pence by refusing to meet with him as the Vice President headed to PyeongChang to support Team USA, citing his support of conversion therapy and generally just being a bigot.

Adam Rippon is arguably one of the more relatable Olympians and is a joy to watch skate. He is living his best life at the Olympics and truly deserves all of the recognition he is getting. Not even the sharp words and "fake news" from Donald Trump Jr. or Mike Pence can stop him from going from the gold.

3. Mirai Nagasu landing a triple axel.

Nagasu made history by being the first America woman to land a triple axel during the Olympics, and the third woman overall to land the jump in Olympic history. The rest of her program was also flawless and finished her routine with a new personal best score.

4. A Finnish coach stress-knitting while waiting for his athlete to compete.

Olympic coaches get stressed too. If you're going to be stressed, at least you can get a nice blanket out of it or something.

5. Chloe Kim hunger-tweeting in between runs (and then winning gold).

Chloe Kim, who is also only 17, represents Gen Z by sending tweets about food while waiting to compete in the Women's Halfpipe finals. Not only did she tweet about wanting ice cream, but also about regretting not finishing her breakfast sandwich that morning. She won the gold regardless of her hanger. Do you, Chloe. After all this training you definitely deserve some ice cream.

6. Shaun White winning his third Olympic gold.

Shaun White is the GOAT of Men's Halfpipe. After dropping out of Slopestyle and failing to medal during the Sochi Olympics, White came back with a vengeance. With only a point difference between himself and Ayumu Hirano from Japan who sat in first place after their second runs ended he had to do the absolute most to secure the gold.

He nailed back to back 1440's which he had never done before during a final. His third gold medal was also Team USA's 100th gold medal in the history of the games.


The Olympics continue on during February and are sure to have many more inspiring, hilarious, and relatable moments. Team USA has definitely brought their A-game and I will definitely continue to tune in every night to catch the action.










Cover Image Credit: Wikipedia Commons

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The Coach That Killed My Passion

An open letter to the coach that made me hate a sport I once loved.
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I fell in love with the game in second grade. I lived for every practice and every game. I lived for the countless hours in the gym or my driveway perfecting every shot, every pass and every move I could think of. Every night after dinner, I would go shoot and would not allow myself to go inside until I hit a hundred shots. I had a desire to play, to get better and to be the best basketball player I could possibly be.

I had many coaches between church leagues, rec leagues, personal coaches, basketball camps, middle school and high school. Most of the coaches I had the opportunity to play for had a passion for the game like I did. They inspired me to never stop working. They would tell me I had a natural ability. I took pride in knowing that I worked hard and I took pride in the compliments that I got from my coaches and other parents. I always looked forward to the drills and, believe it or not, I even looked forward to the running. These coaches had a desire to teach, and I had a desire to learn through every good and bad thing that happened during many seasons. Thank you to the coaches that coached and supported me through the years.

SEE ALSO: My Regrets From My Time As A College Softball Player

Along with the good coaches, are a few bad coaches. These are the coaches that focused on favorites instead of the good of the entire team. I had coaches that no matter how hard I worked, it would never be good enough for them. I had coaches that would take insults too far on the court and in the classroom.

I had coaches that killed my passion and love for the game of basketball.

When a passion dies, it is quite possibly the most heartbreaking thing ever. A desire you once had to play every second of the day is gone; it turns into dreading every practice and game. It turns into leaving every game with earphones in so other parents don't talk to you about it. It meant dreading school the next day due to everyone talking about the previous game. My passion was destroyed when a coach looked at me in the eyes and said, "You could go to any other school and start varsity, but you just can't play for me."

SEE ALSO: Should College Athletes Be Limited To One Sport?

Looking back now at the amount of tears shed after practices and games, I just want to say to this coach: Making me feel bad about myself doesn't make me want to play and work hard for you, whether in the classroom or on the court. Telling me that, "Hard work always pays off" and not keeping that word doesn't make me want to work hard either. I spent every minute of the day focusing on making sure you didn't see the pain that I felt, and all of my energy was put towards that fake smile when I said I was OK with how you treated me. There are not words for the feeling I got when parents of teammates asked why I didn't play more or why I got pulled after one mistake; I simply didn't have an answer. The way you made me feel about myself and my ability to play ball made me hate myself; not only did you make me doubt my ability to play, you turned my teammates against me to where they didn't trust my abilities. I would not wish the pain you caused me on my greatest enemy. I pray that one day, eventually, when all of your players quit coming back that you realize that it isn't all about winning records. It’s about the players. You can have winning records without a good coach if you have a good team, but you won’t have a team if you can't treat players with the respect they deserve.

SEE ALSO: To The Little Girl Picking Up A Basketball For The First Time


Cover Image Credit: Equality Charter School

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Figure Skating Is A Mental Game

Being a competitive athlete, there's many downs but there are moments where it's worth while.

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I feel so anxious that it feels like someone is constantly breathing down my neck. My heart is beating at 100 mph. My insides are tightening up and my palms are sweaty. My legs are frozen to a point where they are numb. The smell of hairspray and the taste of red lipstick lingers. The feeling of the ice against my blades is music to my ears. I tied my skates multiple times so it feels perfect. I keep moving to keep warm.

"Am I supposed to feel this way?".

"It's okay to feel this way, it's normal. I would be concerned if you didn't. Nevertheless, I believe in you. You have worked so hard for this".

"I feel like the weight of the world is on my shoulders, right now. If I don't do well, I failed everyone even myself".

"Don't think like that, you have prepared yourself well and you should have faith in yourself also. No matter what happens today, you should be proud of what you have accomplished in over the years you have skated. This is a lesson in life. If something knocks you down seven times, you get up eight times. That's what this sport has taught you. You are stronger than you think. This is your passion so let go of all of reality now and skate for yourself. Show everyone what you can do, this is your moment".

"Thank you, for everything".

She's right, you are stronger than you think. This is a mental game. If you tear yourself down, you're going to go down. Focus, you have to focus. As she said, you love this sport, the adrenaline and the feeling of being powerful. For once, you actually feel beautiful. Never mind that, but you are beautiful. Outside and in, and beautiful to watch. Skating is my escape from reality which is everything that I don't want, what I don't need. The pressure of being perfect, the mental breakdowns, the fear of failure, and the fear of getting hurt. Anything can happen within any moment but it's a risk that's worth taking.

Just forget it, there's no need to keep dwelling on the things that you can't change. This, right now, is all about you. This is your moment. Take it and never let go.

"And our next skater representing the Summit Figure Skating Club of North Carolina, Jessica Tran".

"Alright, do it to it".

I went out with a smile, the crowd cheering me on as I am getting ready to start my program.

"Breathe, take a deep breath. You got this, trust yourself".

As soon as I stood right in front of the judges, I was ready. The music began, filling the rink with a sudden shock. I turned on my character, my determination, and my love for skating.

Once the music stopped, everything stopped. It went by so fast that all I could really remember was the moment I finished. The heavy breathing, the sore arms, and weak legs. With a huge smile, I bowed to the judges and then to the crowd. I did it. I didn't care about the small mistakes that I did. I didn't care that I landed a difficult element. I didn't care that I fell on the easiest thing that I could do. All that mattered was the fact that I kept going. At the end of the day, medal or not, I'm still a winner.

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