15 Ugly Pictures Of Hillary Clinton And Donald Trump

15 Ugly Pictures Of Hillary Clinton And Donald Trump

Not necessarily the most photogenic duo of all time
14290
views

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, like many of us, aren't always the most photogenic individuals. Here are literally 15 of the ugliest pictures of The Overcooked Sweet Potato In A Toupee and The Scarecrow Lady With Email Issues.

#1

Lovely, Madame Secretary.

#2

My favorite ugly picture of a politician ever.

#3

She's "picking" her next pantsuit.

#4

His hair literally has wings.

#5

Oh dear Lord in heaven...

#6

When someone farts a super stinky fart.

#7

She looks like she's Snapchatting her BFF with whom she has a 145-day streak and doesn't care about looking cute.

#8

He's gonna blow away!

#9

This is the terrifying face of a woman who will eat your children.

#10

And this is the face of a man who said that he would date his own daughter.

#11

An ugly #TBT

#12

Derp.

#13

Oh my actual God. She will eat anyone who angers her!

#14

He looks like he's trying to do an impersonation of a horse.

#15

This is absolutely horrifying and you can now never un-see this. The 45th President of the United States of America: Hillary Trump

Cover Image Credit: cnbc.com

Popular Right Now

I'm A Christian And I Have A Tattoo

Stop judging me for it.
28286
views

Like most people, I turned 18 years old during the course of my senior year of high school.

I'll never forget the months prior to my birthday, though, because I spent hours making a decision that would be with me forever, the decision of where I would go to get my first tattoo and where that tattoo would go, and of course I spent a lot of time deciding on the font, the colors, and all of the other aspects of the tattoo I wanted.

Throughout this time, two things stood firm 1) the fact that I was going to get a tattoo, and 2) the six letter name that it would consist of.

Now, three years later, I'm 21 years old and I still get the occasional dirty look at church on Sunday or in line at Walmart, and more often than not this look is accompanied by the following words: “Why would you do that to your body when God says not to?"

A few weeks ago at a new church, a woman came up to me and said, “How can you consider yourself a Christian when you have that blasphemous thing on your foot?", I simply smiled at her and said: “God bless you, have a good week." I let it roll off of my back, I've spent the past three years letting it “roll off of my back"… but I think it's time that I speak up.

When I was 8 years old, I lost my sister.

She passed away, after suffering from Childhood Cancer for a great deal of my childhood. Growing up, she had always been my best friend, and going through life after she passed was hard because I felt like even though I knew she was with me, I didn't have something to visually tribute to her – a way to memorialize her.

I, being a Christian and believing in Heaven, wanted to show my sister who was looking down on me that even though she was gone – she could still walk with me every day. I wanted it for me, for her. I wanted to have that connection, for her to always be a part of who I am on the outside – just as much as she is a part of who I am on the inside.

After getting my tattoo, I faced a lot of negativity. I would have Leviticus 19:28 thrown in my face more times than I cared to mention. I would be frowned on by various friends, and even some family. I was told a few times that markings on my body would send me to hell – that was my personal favorite.

You shall not make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead, nor print any marks on you: I am the LORD.
Leviticus 19:28

The more I heard these things, the more I wanted to scream. I didn't though. I didn't let the harsh things said about me and my choice change the love I have for the Lord, for my sister, or for the new precious memento on my left foot. I began to study my Bible more, and when I came to the verse that had been thrown in my face many times before – I came to a realization.

Reading the verses surrounding verse 28, I realized that God was speaking to the covenant people of Israel. He was warning them to stay away from the religious ways of the people surrounding them. Verse 28 wasn't directed to what we, in today's society, see as tattoos – it was meant in the context of the cultic practice of marking one's self in the realm of cultic worship.

26 "You shall not eat anything with the blood, nor practice divination or soothsaying. 27 You shall not round off the side-growth of your heads nor harm the edges of your beard. 28 'You shall not make any cuts in your body for the dead nor make any tattoo marks on yourselves: I am the LORD. 29 'Do not profane your daughter by making her a harlot, so that the land will not fall to harlotry and the land become full of lewdness. 30 'You shall keep My sabbaths and revere My sanctuary; I am the LORD. 31 'Do not turn to mediums or spiritists; do not seek them out to be defiled by them. I am the LORD your God."
Leviticus 19:26–31

The more I have studied my Bible over the past few years, the more I pity those who rely on one verse in the Old Testament to judge and degrade those, like myself, who made the decision to get a tattoo for whatever reason they may have for doing so.

This is because, you see, in the New Testament it is said that believers are not bound by the laws of the Old Testament – if we were, there would be no shellfish or pork on the menus of various Christian homes. While some see tattoos as a modification of God's creation, it could also be argued that pierced ears, haircuts, braces, or even fixing a cleft lip are no different.

24 Therefore the Law has become our tutor to lead us to Christ, so that we may be justified by faith. 25 But now that faith has come, we are no longer under a tutor."
Galatians 3:24-25

In Galatians, we read that the Old Testament law was created to lead people to Jesus. However, we know that Jesus has come and died on the cross for our sins. He has saved us, therefore we are no longer held to this law in order to have a relationship with the Lord. Our relationship with Him comes from believing that Jesus came to Earth to die on a cross for our sins, and repenting of our sins – accepting Jesus as our Savior.

I am a Christian, I have a relationship with the Lord that is stronger than it has ever been, and - I HAVE A TATTOO.

I have a beautiful memento on my left foot that reminds me that my sister walks with me through every day of my life. She walked with me down the red carpet at my senior prom, she walked with me across the stage the day I graduated from high school, and she continues to be with me throughout every important moment of my life.

My tattoo is beautiful. My tattoo reminds me that I am never alone. My tattoo is perfect.

Stop judging me for it.

Cover Image Credit: Courtney Johnson

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

The Media Is Biased, Just Not In The Way Trump Thinks

Not all opinions were created equal, and they shouldn't be treated equally.

27
views

Donald Trump is so fond of berating the media that it's become a catchphrase of his: "Fake News" is anything that portrays him in a less-than-glowing light. He attacks newspapers and television networks alike; on Twitter, he's more than once listed out media sources he considers incompetent, usually in retaliation for negative reporting.

His followers have latched onto the "fake news" mantra, and they are quick to whip out the phrase whenever any story surfaces that does not rave about their president. Outlets are branded "the liberal media" or "the leftist media" if they dare criticize Trump, cementing the circular idea that any critical source's reporting must be so biased that it is irrelevant.

For most reasonable people, this is absurd. Freedom of the press is a crucial part of our democracy, and people have the right to express displeasure about political policies and figures. And news outlets absolutely have the right—and the responsibility—to disseminate facts about our government, even if those facts are negative. It's their role to help foster informed citizens.

But ironically, the media is engaging in some bias. It's just not the kind of bias that rabid Trumpian conservatives are alleging.

In the unprecedented presidency of a reality star who cares more about television ratings than constituents and who does most of his press briefings via Twitter rampage, the media, constructed to deal with more traditional politics, has scrambled to keep up. These outlets and the people who run them grew up in a very different political climate.

They were always encouraged to remain neutral, to cover both sides of an issue fairly and thoroughly. This was, of course, a central tenet of journalism ethics, and it remains so. And now, with accusations of bias being regularly flung from the Trump camp, outlets are even more careful to cover all their bases and maintain an image of impartiality.

The problem is, in their attempts to appear unbiased, they have given voice to fascism, bigotry, and blatant lies. They print perspectives from KKK members and host debates about the ethics of discrimination. The instinct to allow all sides a chance to defend their worldview is a good one. But when it equates those who promote genocide and those who are offended by the promotion of genocide—to give one example—it has gone too far. Those stances are not equivalent, and treating them as such is dangerous.

So is the media's careful tiptoeing around the use of labels like "fascism" and "bigotry" and "lies." Likely in an attempt to maintain some semblance of pre-Trump normalcy, they stammer out explanations for all this discourse and policy that lacks rational justification. They want so badly to be fair to the president—and remain unmentioned in his next Twitter tantrum—that they treat him with undue gentleness.

It's time to call the toxic elements of modern politics what they are. Instead of giving them a platform, the media should call them out, criticize them, and accept that doing so will make Trump and his minions furious. That's not unfairness; it's democracy at work.

Cover Image Credit:

Photo by Roman Kraft on Unsplash

Related Content

Facebook Comments