8 Questions I Get Asked After A Ski Race

8 Questions I Get Asked After A Ski Race

How do you think my run went?
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I have spent the last month and a half skiing around on the International Paralympic World Cup circuit. The Paralympic alpine world is so small and I honestly love getting to know not only my American teammates but competitors from all over the world. I love that I can learn something from all of my competitors, and I have gotten to know a lot of them quite well from our conversations during race days. Here’s a list of the things I always get asked directly following a ski race.

1. How’d your run go?

This is kind of the question everyone asks right after the race is finished. Whether they actually care about how I skied or if they just feel the need to make some sort of conversation I kind of always answer with a very general “good” or “eh not great” depending on the day.

2. Did the course run well?

Because I am a visually impaired female I always run very early in the race. A lot of times when I come down after running there are male mono skiers sitting at the bottom waiting to head up the mountain for their run. Often the boys will ask us how the course is running. Even though everyone gets to slip through the course at the beginning of the day it’s sometimes hard to predict exactly how it will feel when you are actually charging full speed.

3. Did you see that huge rut in the middle?

This one’s a little ironic because I am blind so no, no I probably did not notice the minimal snow coverage by one of the gates… unless of course it caused me to land on my face, then I probably found out it was there pretty quickly.

4. How far back are you from first?

In some alpine events the racer’s combined time is taken from two race runs. I get this question a lot between the first and second run of the race. I am the type of person that really doesn’t like to look at times in the middle of runs. For me, numbers can be distracting and I find it better for my performance if I ignore the times until both runs of the race have been completed. Because I don’t focus too much on times during the race, I often answer this question with a “well I am not really sure actually” or “you should ask Sadie she can see the scoreboard better than I can.”

5. Are you on the podium today?

To be honest most of the time I have to answer this by saying something like “no didn’t quite do it today” but I guess that makes all the times I get to say “yes we did it today” just a little sweeter.

6. Did you get late in that middle section?

Ski racing is comprised of both technical and tactical perspectives. Technical is the actual position of the skier whereas tactical is being able to execute the fastest line in the course to bring the racer from the top to the bottom as quickly as possible. When racers inspect a course, tactics are often the primary thought and certain courses leave racers prone to different mistakes. I often get asked by other racers how we ran the line or if we had issues in certain sections. I never really know how to answer these questions though because for me I just follow Sadie.

7. How about that finish area?

In order for a race to run, the track on the course must be maintained enough that it is safe for the racers. However, the finish area tends to get overlooked and often does not have very good snow or space to stop after the finish line. One time I came through the finish with some heat and hit bad snow and totally wiped Sadie out! It was funny in retrospect but it can be scary! I think every athlete has their own humiliating finish line stories, so now we make it a point to talk about how we will stop every time we run a race.

8. Did you have fun?

I love when people ask me this question because it is so easy to get caught up in the emotions of ski racing, and forget all about the fact that we do all of this for fun. Having fun ski racing is something Sadie and I strive for every day, and I think it is really important to reflect on. As an elite athlete it is so easy to forget why you fell in love with a sport. I want to be able to have fun skiing for the rest of my life, so if I ever feel like my racing career is ruining skiing for me I will retire. I feel incredibly fortunate that I still love ski racing. Regardless of the times on the board, I almost always have a great time when I get to do what I love.

Cover Image Credit: Author's photo

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7 Lies From F*ckboys That We've All Fallen For At Least Once

They might've had you goin' for a hot second, but you know better now.
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There’s no use in even frontin’; we’ve all been there. You know he’s a f*ckboy from the beginning, but you’re interested in pursuing him anyway. Ain't no thang; I fully support you.

You tell yourself you won’t fall for his games or lies because you’ve been through it all so many times before. Yet, time and time again, you find yourself slippin’ for a hot second, wanting to give him the benefit of the doubt until he inevitably disappoints you. Here are the top seven lies you’ve heard from f*ckboys that get you heated every time.

1. You’re the only girl I’m talking to/sleeping with


HAHAHA. OK, first, I don't actually care what (or who) you're doing in your spare time because you're definitely not the only guy I'm seeing either. I'm just asking so I know you're clean, OK? I don't need more stress in my life.

2. I know how to treat girls right

Isn't it super ironic how the WORST f*ckboys are the ones to toss this line?

3. I’ll text you

This statement is so unbelievable that on the off chance that they do actually text you, you basically fall out of your chair in shock.

4. I’m gonna give it to you good

I cry/cringe/die of laughter every time I hear this one because it's always the mediocre ones that throw this line. None of my most memorable hookups have ever said this because their actions clearly speak for them. Mediocre boys, TAKE NOTE.

5. Damn, I wanted to see you though

Well, you were supposed to, but then you clearly had other plans in mind. So the desire wasn’t all that intense, obviously.

6. Yeah, she and I broke up

CLASSIC LIE. CLASSIC. Sure, I believed it the first couple of times, but don’t even try that sh*t with me after I see she’s still blowin’ up your line.

7. *No response for hours after making plans* Damn, sorry I fell asleep


Honestly, how many times are you gonna throw that line when you’re literally viewable on Snap Map. BOY, I see you at someone else’s house. Stop frontin’, there’s no point.


Again, don't ask me why we put up with this sh*t because the mystery remains. I guess in our own sick, twisted ways, we crave the dramatics and thrills that come from their f*ckery. Whatever the reason, though, at least we've got some ~fun~ stories to tell.

Cover Image Credit: YouTube | I'm Shmacked

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“All-inclusive” Sports Do More Harm Than Good

The real world requires skill sets and diligence, not a degree in complaining about “fairness.”
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Our school years have an enormous impact on the way we grow as we get older. Who we turn out to be depends greatly (although not entirely) on how we are brought up and what we experience between the ages of 4 and 18. Without realizing it everything we face affects our futures; getting us ready to thrive on our own. One of the most significant things we experience growing is the possibility of failure and the need to improve. High school sports and interactive clubs are coincidentally the primary source of experience for this necessary life lesson.

High school extracurriculars such as clubs and club sports are all-inclusive, a way to enjoy a hobby without being “cut” and to experience and delve into different ideas. Clubs are important in that they help shape our values and thought processes without the “tough love” aspect but instead as an equal group of members.

High school sports and teams are not the same thing nor should they be. Most high school sports involve tryouts and result in some participants to get cut from consideration, or in some cases are placed between “A” and “B” teams based on talent and ability. High school sports in this way teach us the necessity to improve and the need to exceed, traits imperative to success in careers in the real world. Sports that have room for a certain number of teammates cause players and athletes to have to show their worth, prove their strength and exercise dedication. Not taking a team sport seriously and lacking to show any steadfast traits ultimately results in failure to make the team. This should show athletes that wanting something does not get you anywhere, rather working for it and putting the effort in is what will get you there. The failure to make a team and the threat of less playing time as a consequence for deficient effort makes a determined individual work harder and focus on improving the skills necessary to succeed.

The real world requires effort and determination. To succeed and excel in careers you need to work hard, prove your worth and exemplify strength and diligence in your field. You will not get anywhere without hard work and constantly improving your skills and abilities. Success in reality is like success on a team sport: if you show little desire and hardly any rigor you will not get anywhere nor will you climb further in success in your career. Knowing how to fix what you do wrong or are not excellent in, not whining and complaining about the basis for success “not being fair” is how you will get places in life, whether in sports or in careers.

High school teams becoming “all-inclusive” is more harmful than it is good to society. To eliminate the expectations of a team sport, to not require hard work and effort and a skill set is to teach teens laziness and to expect what you want instead of working for it. Giving in to every single participant does not reflect the necessary prerequisites for success in the workforce. High school sports have more importance to our development than just exercise and athleticism. Allowing every participant to be on a team or get a trophy fails to mold students into successful, driven adults. If you do not want to face being cut from a team or not playing as much, join a club sport instead of a team sport.

The real world requires improvement for us to be successful. Participation trophies and “all-inclusive” sports teams teach us otherwise.

Cover Image Credit: LexiHanna

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