The Coolest Abandoned Places To Visit In Atlanta

The Coolest Abandoned Places To Visit In Atlanta

"Welcome to Atlanta where the players play, and places get abandoned like everyday"
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Within the hustle and bustle of the city and past the glamorous, shiny skyscrapers are places overflowing with graffiti, abandonment and beauty that you didn't even know existed. Looking past a city full of businessmen are a group of people looking for the forgotten and left behind. They go around the U.S., some even the world, finding the coolest abandoned places, taking photographs, and leaving everything just as they found it. This type of exploration, known as Urban Exploring or Urbex, discourages against any kind of destruction or graffiti of the abandoned properties. Collaborating with a photographer and friend (who has chosen to remain anonymous for legal reasons), we put together a list of the coolest abandoned places in Atlanta that you've probably passed without even realizing it.

1. Pratt-Pullman Train Yard

Located just south of Little Five Points and off of Dekalb highway, the 27-acre Pratt-Pullman Train Yard has slowly been forgotten over time. According to the Atlanta Journal Constitution, It first opened in the year 1900 as the Pratt Engineering and Machine Company which developed military weaponry and machinery during World War I, and, in 1922, was acquired by the Pullman Train Company for maintenance on train cars. Occasionally used in movie sets such as in the "Hunger Games" and "Fast and Furious," the train yard remains desolate and slowly taken over by greenery and graffiti.

2. Alonzo Herdon Stadium

Built for the 1996 Atlanta Olympics field hockey, as reported by Atlanta Magazine, Herdon Stadium, named after Atlanta's first African American millionaire Alonzo Herdon, was donated to Morris Brown College in downtown Atlanta and just minutes from the Georgia Dome and the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium (both visible from the top of the stadium). Soon after the Olympics ended, the stadium was used as the set of "Fairfield Stadium" in the movie We Are Marshall and was also the location of a Ray Charles concert. However, after the school lost accreditation, the number of enrolled students began to dwindle and the amount of graffiti and garbage began to rise. While the college now only enrolls 40 students, the stadium still stands empty today as a remembrance of what used to be the location of excitement.

3. The Bridge to No Where

If you have ever driven at the intersection of Highway 78 and Northside Dr. NW, you have passed probably passed this bridge and without even noticing it. According to HistoricBridges.org, the so-called "Bridge to No Where" was built in 1912 and located just off of Bankhead Avenue. Once used as a main route for Atlanta traffic, It gets its name from the mere fact that it leads to nowhere- it literally just drops off over the highway with no connecting road. It now sits desolate and is slowly being overtaken by the earth and clothing of the homeless.

4. The Atlanta Prison Farm

As reported by a website promoted to saving the Atlanta Prison Farm, this 1,248 acre prison, bought in 1918 by the United States Federal Penitentiary in Atlanta, is not your typical prison. Created for those who were once convicted of minor crimes, the idea of a "prison farm" was an experiment allowing prisoners to harvest there own food and take care of farm animals, and the guards did not carry any firearms and were more agricultural experts than prison guards. Although the prison farm was successful, it was abruptly shut down in 1965 and the land and prison has sat desolate to this day. Legend has it, the farm was also the burial site of many Atlanta Zoo's largest animals and elephants. (Learn ways you can help and volunteer to save the Atlanta Prison Farm here)



Although full of history, Atlanta either choses to destroy its historic buildings for luxury apartment buildings or choses to forget and neglect it until the the earth takes it back as its own. It's time Atlanta does something about these huge, century old buildings and begin to revitalize and restore them in order to keep them in good condition. Setting an example in historic preservation and restoration, is the University of Alabama's plan to repurpose and restore the beautiful Bryce Hospital, an old and abandoned asylum located on campus, into faculty offices and a performing arts center without tearing down and destroying its beautifully historic architecture (read more about the restoration of Bryce Hospital here). Instead of building brand new buildings, Atlanta needs to focus on maintaining these forgotten historic landmarks instead of just tossing them aside to focus on new, modern skyscrapers.

*WARNING: If you choose to explore these places for yourself, please be aware of the legal and environmental dangers you may encounter and enter at your own risk. Most of these places are invested with dangerous animals and continuously watched by the police. This article does not endorse breaking and entering or trespassing. This article is simply to allow others to see the forgotten and hidden beauty of Atlanta.*

Cover Image Credit: Anonymous

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Signs You're An INFJ, The World's Rarest Personality Type

INFJ, from the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator instrument, is believed to be the rarest personality type, and to make up less than 2% of the population. Oh, and I am one.
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INFJ, referring to one of the 16 Myers-Briggs personality types, has become a bit of a buzzword in the media over the past several years. The reason behind it: INFJ is considered to be the rarest personality type, making up less than 2% of the world's entire population. They are labeled as "The Advocate," and have been described as "mysterious," "intuitive," and "emotionally intelligent," yet the type as a whole is often misunderstood.

Oh, and I am one. Perhaps you are, as well.

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test, created in the 1940's by mother and daughter, Isabel Myers and Katharine Briggs, originally stems from the typological theories of Carl Jung, a prominent psychoanalyst. The test assesses an individual in 4 categories: Extroversion vs. Introversion, Sensing vs. Intuition, Thinking vs. Feeling, and Judging vs. Perceiving, and using these criteria, determines which category one’s personality most tilts toward. INFJs would be those individuals whose personalities favor the sides of Introverted, Intuitive, Feeling, and Judging.

INFJs can be difficult to spot due to the fact that they are not prevalent in society and tend to be reserved individuals. However, INFJs make fiercely loyal friends, empathetic and organized workers, and exceptional leaders for causes they deem worthy and for the greater good of humanity.

INFJs often report feeling lonely and "different," and for good reason. INFJs are low in numbers so they tend to have trouble finding others who see the world in the same realm as they do. Most people who are this type have admitted feeling different from their peers since they were a very young child.

INFJs take an all-or-nothing approach to life. INFJs, a curious mix of emotional and logical, do not like to waste their time on anything inauthentic. Although they may dabble with playing the field, INFJs are truly about quality over quantity and will become disinterested in anyone or anything they perceive as being fraudulent, scheming or wishy-washy.

INFJs exude warmness, and others immediately feel comfortable in their presence. It is not uncommon for a stranger to sit down next to an INFJ and within minutes, disclose their most personal secrets, fears and dreams. In fact, this happens frequently to INFJs with seemingly no rhyme or reason. This personality type has a knack for making others immediately feel at ease, and they are great listeners and trusted confidants who speak in human terms and meet others where they are.

INFJs are somewhat empathic, and they tend to "just know" things. One of my favorite one-liners from Game of Thrones is by the character, Tyrion Lannister, "I drink and I know things," and this can often be said of an INFJ, with maybe fewer libations. INFJs have a highly-accurate sense of intuition that they have been sharpening for all of their lives. Without understanding exactly why or how, an INFJ will see, within minutes of meeting an individual, their true character. As a result, they tend to be more forgiving of their friends who exhibit unruly behavior because they can identify the true root of the behavior, such as insecurities or past trauma.

INFJs ultimately seek genuine truth and meaning. This personality type does not care one iota about grandiose tales or extravagant gestures if there is not a true and genuine motive behind them. An INFJ’s calling in life is to seek insight and understanding, and as they develop, they often can spot a lie or half-truth in a moment's notice. If they believe an individual to be a phony or a manipulator, they will have no trouble writing them off. Likewise, this type often enjoys traveling, adventures and experiences that heighten their understanding of the intricacies of life and promote self-reflection.

INFJs are true introverts, yet people not very close to them believe them to be extroverts. This happens because INFJs can be social chameleons and have an innate ability to blend in in any social setting. The INFJ can be the life of the party for a night or two, showcasing their inviting nature and vivaciousness. However, this is never prolonged because, in introverted-fashion, they lose energy from others. Those close to an INFJ know that this type prefers bars over clubs and barbecues over balls, and can give a speech to thousands of people but cringes at the idea of mingling with the crowd afterward. Eventually, this type will need to retreat home for some quiet time to "recharge their batteries," or they will become very on-edge and exhausted.

INFJs have intense, unwavering convictions, sometimes to a fault. An INFJ has certain ideas about the world and a need to foster change in society. These are deep-seated and intense beliefs that they will never abandon. If a career, relationship, or law does not align with their moral compass, an INFJ will have no qualms about ignoring it or leaving it in the dust.

INFJs tend to keep a small circle of friends and prefer to work alone. Although an INFJ may have hundreds of acquaintances, if they call you a "friend," you can be sure that they mean it for life. This type can count their close friends on a set of fingers and they will be loyal and devoted to these prized individuals no matter how much time passes between their interactions. An INFJ can be a great team player but the idea of group projects and collaboration meetings naturally make them sink down in their seat. These are people who enjoy working from home or in a quaint office with a handful of like-minded coworkers.

INFJs cannot stand small talk. This trait aligns with the need to pursue truth and all things bona fide. To an INFJ, small talk not only takes energy, but has little purpose as it is merely speaking to fill silence without revealing any deeper layers of the individuals involved. Do not talk to an INFJ about the weather unless you want to see a glazed-over look. Instead, tell them about the causes you are promoting, the wish-list of your soul, or the way you smile every time you smell lavender because it reminds you of your great grandmother.

INFJs are typically high-achievers and people-pleasers. If you want a task done right the first time, hand it over to an INFJ. They will plan every detail down to the minute and will always deliver a glowing finished product. However, when delivering criticism to this type, do it gently, as they take every word to heart and are always striving for perfection. This type is a unique blend of a dreamer and a doer, but they can easily fall prey to extreme bouts of anxiety or depression centered on feelings of inadequacy or failure.

INFJs are gifted in language and are often creative writers. In accordance with their introverted nature, INFJs prefer to spend time alone and develop enriched inner-lives with many hobbies and skills. This type has trouble conveying their emotions verbally, so they turn to pen and paper. This, combined with their creative nature, leaves no surprise that the majority of successful writers are, in fact, INFJs.

INFJs make decisions based off of emotion and insight. An INFJ judges the world around them and the people in it based off of how they make them feel. This type does not care about track records and performance history, instead they look for the heart of the matter and how a person or company treats them personally. This type will trust their "gut feeling" about a situation and go with that, which has almost always proven to be accurate.

INFJs like to reflect on deep thoughts about their purpose and the world around them. This type is a thinker. INFJs are old-souls who spend a lot of time in their own minds reflecting on their purpose and the meaning behind everything that happens to them. They are often readers, researchers and intellectuals who truly enjoy learning. Although this is a noble endeavor, it is essential that the INFJ has friends, typically of the extroverted type, who can help them to be less serious and relax every now and then.

INFJs are visionaries who always see the big picture. This type tends to always operate about ten steps ahead. They are skilled planners and focus their sights on the end goal and what is needed to propel them there. However, while INFJs are off in dreamland about their futures, they can sometimes forget to be present in the world that is happening now. As a result, they do well with other more grounded types who can remind them to live in the moment.

INFJs are "fixers," and they gravitate towards people who need help. This type loves a good fixer-upper and with their ability to see the "good bones" of another person, their true motives and intentions, and to readily provide comfort and compassion, they fall victim to the Broken Wing Theory, or the idea that they can rescue others who have a "broken wing," or who have been dealt a poor hand. This can be rewarding for the hopeful INFJ but also frustrating and depleting when boundaries are overstepped.

INFJs seek lifelong, true-blue relationships. This type usually finds themselves with intuitive extroverts, such as the ENTPs, ENFPs, and ENFJs. These types connect with the INFJ on the deeper plane of intuition, yet also will get the INFJ out of their own heads and out on the town on a Saturday night.

Think you might be an INFJ? Find out which type you are here: https://www.mbtionline.com/.

Cover Image Credit: www.pexels.com

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It's 2019, And I Still Use A Weekly Planner

There is something about physically writing things down for that makes it easier to remember dates and deadlines.

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Even with all the technology that is available to us nowadays, I still use an old-fashioned planner. I keep it in my backpack and you will see me pull it out if I need to add events for that week. Usually I will review the syllabus for my classes at the start of each semester and put down the important test dates or dates for other assignments. By doing this, I get a visual outline of what each will look like and what weeks will be extra heavy with school and other clubs that I am involved in on campus. Even though having this is a nice tool to help plan ahead and budget my time, it is by no means a failsafe. Sometimes I get this feeling that I forgot to do something that day but can't think of what it is. When this happens, I can refer back to my planner and look to see if I missed anything. The key point is to not forget to write things down, otherwise, all will be lost.

With today's technology, iPhones can do pretty much anything, I am aware that there is google calendar which can be synced up with a MacBook as well. This doesn't work for me because it takes too long to enter the events in my phone and I have not grown used to it. Another point is that I don't have a MacBook so it would only be accessible from my phone. I have found that it is just quicker to jot an event down by hand in my planner. For some people this might seem like a hassle having to pull out their planner when wanting to write down something they need to accomplish for that day. Since people spend a lot of time being on their laptops or phones it would be more convenient for them, being that they know how to work the app.

Either way, keeping a daily schedule or planner has many benefits. As mentioned before, it can help reduce the possibility of forgetting important due dates for exams or projects and other deadlines. Writing things down can also help reduce stress. There are times where there is too much on our plate to handle at once, we might have the feeling that everything needs to get done, which can be overwhelming. When I put things down on paper, it doesn't seem as bad and I can take care of what needs to be done at the moment and then work from there. I feel great after checking off a couple things from my to-do list because I can see that progress is being made.

Another use is to build in some time to relax or just time for yourself into your daily or weekly schedule, this can prevent the feeling of being burned out. Building in free time should have limits, especially for people who may spend too much time watching Netflix or Television. I would know because there are times where it can feel like hours go by and I haven't accomplished anything productive.

I highly recommend anyone who is in college to keep a planner, otherwise the stress can be too much to handle.

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