No, You Aren't 'Crazy,' And We Need To Stop Using That Word Altogether

No, You Aren't 'Crazy,' And We Need To Stop Using That Word Altogether

You may have been called crazy, and you may even believe it. But, don't.
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Crazy. It's a word that has become integrated into our daily language.

If you ask the guy you like why he double tapped a girl's picture, he calls you crazy.

If you have an opinion that is different than everyone else, then you're crazy.

If you are getting married too young, or too old, then you're crazy.

Pretty much no matter what, you're crazy.

But, the truth is: you're not crazy.

Crazy is an all-encompassing word used to describe something that is undesirable. It is a word that that mocks mental health. A word that convinces you that you're the problem, that you're feelings are the problem.

You aren't crazy, you're human.

It's normal to feel. It is okay to wake up one day and feel one emotion, just to wake up the next day and feel different. It's okay to wake up each day and feel the same. It's okay that you don't know how to describe your feelings, and that you don't really know why you feel the way you feel.

It isn't okay to make someone feel less because they having feelings that you don't understand.

Mental health is becoming an everyday topic. College campuses focus on improving mental health for students, and people are taking the initiative to work on their mental health individually. It is becoming more common to see people working in the best interest of their mental health because it's finally being recognized the way it should be.

Mental health should be talked about, because mental health changes so frequently. The condition of your mental health can be different from day-to-day, and it is okay to not completely understand these feelings.

Mental illness is common. About 18 percent of the adult population in the United States suffer from mental illness every year. Mental illnesses refer to mental health conditions that may impacts your mood, thinking, or behavior. Mental illnesses range from depression to schizophrenia, and everything in-between. The stigma around mental illness creates an isolation of those impacted.

Once it is revealed that someone has a mental illness, they are seen differently, treated differently. They are ostracized, and it creates a stereotype that cause both average people and professionals to be wary or nervous about them.

The word "crazy" is demeaning.

It makes it seem that feelings and emotions and conditions are out of the ordinary, that they are "wrong" and that you are the problem. It creates the basis for the stereotypes that lead to the stigma surrounding mental illness.

However, you aren't the problem. You are a human that has a real life and real struggles.

No one can judge how you feel, and how that impacts your everyday life.

You aren't crazy, you're strong.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels.com

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I Weigh Over 200 Lbs And You Can Catch Me In A Bikini This Summer

There is no magic number that determines who can wear a bikini and who cannot.
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It is about February every year when I realize that bikini season is approaching. I know a lot of people who feel this way, too. In pursuit of the perfect "summer body," more meals are prepped and more time is spent in the gym. Obviously, making healthier choices is a good thing! But here is a reminder that you do not have to have a flat stomach and abs to rock a bikini.

Since my first semester of college, I've weighed over 200 pounds. Sometimes way more, sometimes only a few pounds more, but I have not seen a weight starting with the number "1" since the beginning of my freshman year of college.

My weight has fluctuated, my health has fluctuated, and unfortunately, my confidence has fluctuated. But no matter what, I haven't allowed myself to give up wearing the things I want to wear to please the eyes of society. And you shouldn't, either.

I weigh over 200lbs in both of these photos. To me, (and probably to you), one photo looks better than the other one. But what remains the same is, regardless, I still chose to wear the bathing suit that made me feel beautiful, and I'm still smiling in both photos. Nobody has the right to tell you what you can and can't wear because of the way you look.

There is no magic number that equates to health. In the second photo (and the cover photo), I still weigh over 200 lbs. But I hit the gym daily, ate all around healthier and noticed differences not only on the scale but in my mood, my heart health, my skin and so many other areas. You are not unhealthy because you weigh over 200 lbs and you are not healthy because you weigh 125. And, you are not confined to certain clothing items because of it, either.

This summer, after gaining quite a bit of weight back during the second semester of my senior year, I look somewhere between those two photos. I am disappointed in myself, but ultimately still love my body and I'm proud of the motivation I have to get to where I want to be while having the confidence to still love myself where I am.

And if you think just because I look a little chubby that I won't be rocking a bikini this summer, you're out of your mind.

If YOU feel confident, and if YOU feel beautiful, don't mind what anybody else says. Rock that bikini and feel amazing doing it.

Cover Image Credit: Sara Petty

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8 Things You Learn When You're Related To A Drug Addict

1. No one is obligated to choose you.
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Being the child, or family member of a drug addict can be hard but depending on how you look at it, it can also be a blessing in a very weird way. Here are eight things you learn about life from being the child or family member of a drug addict.

1. No one is obligated to choose you.

2. When people choose you, you know to cherish it.

3. Not everyone is going to understand your situation.

4. People have very skewed opinions about families of drug addicts.

5. People can change.

6. Not all people choose to change.

7. Being selfish is actually a lot of work.

8. Don't judge a book by its cover, or a person by their family members.

There are many things you learn about life, often sooner than most, when you're related or close to a drug addict. In my case, I have many members of my dad's family as well as my dad, who overdosed when I was young, who are addicted to drugs. Seeing people choose substance over blood at a young age is eyeopening, and hard to understand. As you get older and begin to understand the severity of the situation; life becomes clearer. You don't trust everyone you meet, you try to stay away from risky behavior, and family that chooses you becomes all the more important.

Cover Image Credit: Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

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