The Ultimate Guide To Being An Odyssey Creator

The Ultimate Guide To Being An Odyssey Creator

Step by step instructions to creating great content and sharing it with the world!
10785
views

Before becoming an Odyssey Creator, there's one important question you need to ask yourself:

What Is A Successful Odyssey Community?

By joining an Odyssey community, a content Creator becomes immersed in an ongoing conversation. You discover content from other Creators and brainstorm new article ideas about topics that interest you. You bring your hyperlocal point of view to Odyssey’s platform, and your unique voice resonates with thousands of readers.

A successful team creates these community dialogues on a weekly basis, covering topics that are relevant, timely and interesting. As leaders in your area, you spark unique conversations in the digital space and democratize the way in which stories are told online. Your content is shared through social media networks, and people start to recognize you. You’re an Odyssey content Creator. You’re developing a following, and because of your influence, others want to join the conversation, too.


So where do you fit in? How can you make an impact?

In order for an Odyssey Creator to actually effect change in the world with their stories, they first need to get their voices out there. This happens through sharing. While our CMS allows Creators to schedule Facebook and Twitter shares throughout the week, they shouldn't stop there. Each article should be shared on three or more platforms. Beyond Facebook and Twitter, this includes Instagram, Pinterest, StumbleUpon, Tumblr, Reddit, LinkedIn, email, and beyond. It is the job of an AME to give Creators the tools to tell their stories, and teaching them how to best promote their stories on social media is a huge part of this.

Additionally, each article should be shared on three or more platforms multiple times a week. Out of 1,000 potential stories you could see on your Facebook feed any given day, there are only 250 slots. If you log onto Facebook one time a day, you may only see 20 post. That means, if your friend shared an article only once, you could easily miss it. Sharing multiple times throughout the week on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram will help you get more and more readers.

For more information on best sharing practices, follow Odyssey Pro Tips.


Once you join a community, you'll need to know the ins and outs of creating content. Here's a step by step guide on how to do just that!

The Basics Of Our CMS:

CMS stands for “Content Management System,” and here at Odyssey, we have created our own system. It is extremely user-friendly, but here are some tips to help you get started. Your Managing Editor will also train you on the system via a Google Hangout.

To log in, go to theodysseyonline.com/admin and enter your username and password.

To log in, go to theodysseyonline.com and select “CREATE” and enter your username and password provided via email, or go directly to theodysseyonline.com/admin.

Before you begin, make sure that you update your biography, tagline, and link your social media profiles.

Do not, however, change your school/community name in your profile! If you joined a geographic community like “Austin, TX,” for example, do not change your school to “University of Texas.”

How To Set Up Auto Shares In MUSE:

1. Once signed in, click on your name in the top-right corner.

2. After your account information/profile is loaded, follow the “Click here to manage your social media account access” link located directly below the profile picture.

3. Once this page loads (Manage Account page), scroll to the bottom where it says “Use another service to log in,” with the Twitter and Facebook button below.

4. Select the Facebook button to open the prompt to enter your credentials to link your social media account. Repeat and do the same thing, this time selecting the Twitter button.

Tips For If You Run Into Trouble:

You hit a wall? It happens to all of us.

1. Make sure you are using Chrome as your browser as this is what we suggest using with our system. (Make sure you go to this sign-in page: http://theodysseyonline.com/admin without “www” in the URL.)

2. If you are using Chrome, clear your browsing history and cache (when you go to delete these, select the “from beginning of time” option from the drop-down menu. This will remove any saved passwords on other sites, so if you think that may be a problem, just go to #3).

3. Try opening a new window in “incognito” (Command+Shift+N) mode. Right-click on the Chrome icon and select “new incognito window” and then try signing on.

4. Remember to contact edithelp@theodysseyonline.com if you have questions!

Open your “Writer Dashboard.” From here, you can see a few things:

● All articles you’ve ever written and their links.

● The total social engagement each article has received.

● Your community’s “top article” of the week.

● Past “Top Article Winners”: Those that have received high engagement in past weeks.

● The “+New Article” button so you can submit your next piece.

After you click on “+New Article,” you will be able to begin creating your piece of content.

On this page, you want to make sure to:

  • Choose if you are writing an “Article” or “Listicle”
    • A “listicle” is a piece of content written in a list format. If your piece has 11+ more points, make sure to choose Listicle.” These get edited slightly differently.
    • If you are writing a list, make sure to go to the bottom of this document for more information on how to properly format it.
  • Choose your CMS Subject Line.
    • This is something that is only we can see internally. We recommend putting a description of what the piece is as well as when it should go live. For example: Donald Trump Article 2/15. (This way it is easy to keep track of in the ­system.)
  • Choose if you are writing a “Standard” or “News” piece.
    • If you are writing something on a current event, make sure that you click “News.” This will help to get the piece edited faster so that it is timely when it is posted. “News” to Odyssey actually is defined as ”Current Content.” This means it can be a reaction to a current event or a perspective relevant to an existing national conversation rather than an aggregated news piece.

Make sure as you write your piece of content that your piece is always longer than 500 words and includes an intro paragraph if it is a list. On the side, we have a “Comment” feature, so please make comments if you have questions for your Managing Editor/Editor-­in-­Chief about tips for your piece. They will see it in the final stages before post. If you have a pressing question, utilize email and connect your EIC and Managing Editor.

Write your headline. This is your space to hook Odyssey users with a clever, pithy title. How sad would it be if all your hard work went unappreciated because you didn’t focus enough on crafting your headline? Please make sure to capitalize the first letter of every word. That’s just Odyssey style.

LEARN MORE: How To Craft The Perfect Headline

When you click to add a Cover Photo, you will have to attribute your image. If you do not do this, your article will not be posted.

If it is your image, make sure to write your name under Attribution.

If it is not your image, make sure to insert the link from where the image is from under

“Attribution URL” as well as the photographer’s name under “Attribution.”

Don't use an image that you are not legally entitled to re-use. You wouldn't plagiarize somebody else's words, don't do the same with images.

LEARN MORE: Do Copyright RIGHT

Insert tags and choose your category.

Tags: These are extremely important as they help visitors to Odyssey find your content. They also help with SEO (Search Engine Optimization). Make sure to put all tags that are relevant to your content. For example, if you write on Donald Trump, some tags could be: Donald Trump, Trump 2016, Republicans, Apprentice, Nomination, Hillary Clinton, Jeb Bush, etc.

Segments are used to categorize articles for users who do a refined content search. You should be as specific as possible when selecting categories.





Choose Your “Slug.”

Your slug is essentially your URL. It should feature the most essential words from your headline or the point of your article — the keywords somebody might type into Google to search for what your article is about. Once you like a slug, click on the part that is green until it says “Claimed.” From there, you can move to the next step.

Preview. This is so you can see exactly how your piece will appear on different devices. Make sure that your cover photo appears in the way you would like it to. If not, go back and make changes.

Choose Submission Deadline: Choose the next available deadline.


Choose Preferred Digital Post Date: Choose the Monday or Tuesday after the deadline. Our traditional posting schedule is on Mondays or Tuesdays, if you want something posted in a timely fashion, reach out to your Editor­-in-­Chief. For example, if you are submitting it for the deadline of 2/21, choose 2/22 as the digital post date as this is when editors will be editing it.

Write A Social Network Brief: This should be similar to your sub-headline and should tease what is being written about. Never write “Click here” or “Please share!” as your Social Network Brief or Blurb. Would you want to read an article where the writer posted, “Share this, please!!!!”? Nope, we wouldn’t either.

Example:

Schedule Shares. The most important part. Don’t you want to get your content seen?

Click on “Facebook” and “Twitter” to “Add a share.”

Include a short message with your piece. This is what will be shared on your social profiles. We recommend teasing to the article and explaining what the article is about to your followers.

When the article is posted on our platform, it will be shared on your social media platform at the time that you have set. Make sure to share your article on at least three other social networking platforms like Pinterest, Instagram, LinkedIn, Tumblr, StumbleUpon, Reddit, etc. And share more than once. Sharing multiple times on multiple platforms means your content will reach even more readers!






Still want more? Request a call with one of our Engagement Specialists through our CDP (Creator Development Program.) You'll get to meet one of our most qualified specialists and talk about things like content packaging and social sharing!

And there you have it! You've created a great piece of content and you're ready to share it with the world. How far your piece will travel is completely in your hands --- so get to creating!



Want to be a part of the exec team?

Why should you be a part of your local editorial executive team?


  • Creator experience outside the Odyssey bubble: Giving creators the opportunity to take on leadership and responsibility that they can carry onto future opportunities depending on their career trajectory
  • These positions don’t diminish the EIC role as it is now or what it could be in the future. Rather, these different leadership roles gives the EIC the opportunity to hold his/her executive team accountable. The EIC is partaking in all of the other leaders’ responsibilities, but has a direct person who knows everything about a particular EIC task [i.e., The EIC understands Facebook’s algorithm and can coach creators around packaging, but the social media director makes it a point to research best practices to present to EIC, do smart sharing hacks, etc.]
  • Giving creators these titles specifically presents new opportunities for them to interact with different counterparts across the country! There can also be opportunities for them to benefit from group calls with NYC’s best outreach specialists, audience development team, or culture queens

Here are the positions you can be screened for! If you're interested, contact your EIC:

1. Outreach Specialist

2. Social Media Director

3. Community Health Manager

4. Contributing Editor

Popular Right Now

17 Things Only Nursing Students Would Understand

Hoo boy.

28527
views

Nursing students everywhere have all similar struggles and can all come to an equal understanding when it comes to school. Many things come right to mind when I think of how much my life has changed since I made the decision to study nursing.

I have gave up a lot just to allow myself to go through this schooling but it was all proven to be worth it. If you are a nursing student I can almost guarantee all of these will spark an insight into what it is like.

1. Coffee is our water

It should seriously be "Nurses run on Dunkin" because the hours spent studying, waking up at the crack of dawn for clinical, the lack of sleep, the amount of school work, etc. would not at all be possible without the energy that coffee gives us.

2. Broke is an understatement

Who can work when you have probably more than one nursing exam, 2 care plans due on two different patients, clinical paperwork, ATI's, homework, etc? Squeezing in time to work is seriously a hard task and so money is often sparse and being a broke college student becomes an understatement.

3. College students go out every weekend?

Of course nursing students do get to go out from time to time, but the whole "I am a college student and go out 4 days a week" is not a thing to us. We know the struggles of having time to go out but realizing we have to do an assignment a week ahead of time because we know about how much we will be slammed with during the week. There is no such thing as free time when you are a nursing student. More like a study party. And when we do go out after a while, it is a complete and utter disaster.

4. Chose the answer that is most correct

Nursing students know the real struggle of narrowing down a test question to two answers because of all the 4 answers on a test question they are all correct; except you have to chose the answer that is MOST correct. It is not just a regular test where there is a right answer. You are ALWAYS right but it's not always the best answer.

5. Don't forget, select all that apply

This "select all that apply" is 10x worse than choosing the answer that is most correct. It doesn't matter if you have 2 of the 3 answers that are correct, you still get the entire question wrong. Not to mention, almost every single question on our licensing exam is select all that apply. If you think these are easy, you are simply not human.

6. Mental breakdowns and saying "I'm changing majors"

The daily to weekly mental breakdowns of hysterical crying and anxiety attacks because all of the things expected of us just do not seem possible. It's okay to admit that you have said several times that you wanted to change your major because of how difficult it is to keep up and pass. You manage to get through it though with hard work and dedication.

7. Saying goodbye to straight A's

Although you may have had straight A's in high school, say goodbye to that 4.0 GPA you were hoping for. You envy college students that have straight A's but you also don't realize that they also don't study nursing. We tend to be so hard on ourselves for not getting perfect grades but we truly don't get ourselves enough credit for just passing (which may I mention is about an 80 to even pass a class).

8. Dreading writing care plans (Rn Dx, Related To, As Evidenced By)

You think nursing students just go to clinical to learn how to care for patients to learn? WRONG. SO WRONG. We spend HOURS after clinical making care plans, reflections, SBAR assignments, etc. to hand in to our clinical professor on time on top of all the other class work we have to do for our other nursing classes.

9. What is sleep?


Have a test tomorrow? Who cares if you studied a week in advance, you know for sure you will be up the whole night up until the test is that morning. Have homework due in class? You know you will be up well past 3 in the morning finishing it.

10. Not yet a nurse, but friends and family sure as hell think you are

When friends or family talk about a possible medical condition and ask you to help them, you always have to remind them that you are not yet a nurse. Yet, they still want your opinion even though you have no idea if you are right or wrong. Nursing students are always receiving texts and calls from their friends that are being hypochondriacs or are sick.

11. More reading to do than reading the bible 7 times

There is no such thing as "finishing all of your reading." Teachers assign 4 chapter readings, let me remind you. One chapter is at least 50 pages of text book readings. Also, don't forget you have to outline all this reading because you know you are guaranteed to forget over half the stuff you have read.

12. Friends from nursing school are different from the rest

You can have all the best friends in the world but nothing compares to your nursing friends. They understand EVERYTHING you are going through. They know the struggle, the hardships, and the amount of stress each of you are under. I don't think it is possible to survive nursing school without them (shout out to Alexis and Jenna). They are there through every failure and every success.

13. Getting used to waking up while it's still dark for clinical

Every nursing student knows this struggle for sure and we might as well get used to it.

14. You hate bodily fluids? Might as well change your major

Nursing majors care and love more for other people that they are willing to clean up every single type of bodily fluid possible no matter what the situation. We are experts at wiping butt if you like it or not.

15. But...No matter what there is no other life we would chose

Nursing is not a career, it is a calling. It is the most amazing thing in this world there is to do. A nurse cares for someone else so much more than they do for themselves, and they don't even have to know the person. All the sweat, tears, blood, etc. are all worth it to us. "The best way to find yourself is in the service of others."

16. There is NO such thing as 'syllabus week'

Doesn't matter if your first class of the semester is one hour or if it is three hours there is never just a syllabus week. You are always staying the whole class and you are always beginning material.

17. Every week is finals week

Every week feels like finals week. The amount of stress and work due each week is overwhelming. But somehow we manage to get it done.

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

14 Signs You Go To A Small School No One Has Ever Heard Of

"Your class size is what?!?"

69
views

When most people are in high school, they look at all of the big schools that are known around the country. Schools like Rutgers, Ohio State, UCLA, University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University are often at the top of peoples' lists. Believe it or not, some people don't want to attend a huge college. If you're like me, you like having small class sizes where your professors get to know you and you always see someone you know when you're walking on campus.

Once you decide where you're going and become a student there, you constantly hear the same comments from people, whether they be good or bad- but you wouldn't want it any other way. Here are signs that you go to a small school that no one has ever heard of:

1. People always mess up your mascot

Rider University

"Broncs? Like the Denver Broncos?"

"No. Just the Broncs."

2. "Oh I've never heard of that. Where is it?"

3. "Wouldn't you rather go to *insert huge state school here*?"

The answer is always the same — nope.

4. You find people all the time who know or is related to someone who went to your school

"Oh, my cousin's friend went there!"

5. "Your class size is what?!?"

6. You've never had class in a lecture hall

Patricia M Guenther

Or class with more than 50 students.

7. When people come to visit, they can't believe how small your campus is compared to theirs

Well, at least we can get up 10 minutes before class starts instead of an hour to catch a bus.

8. Dining options are limited

Rider University

But you joke around and make the most of it, secretly hoping your campus will open a Panera or Chipotle like every other school.

9. People are amazed that you actually get to know your professors and the people in your classes, and that they get to know you

Not to mention that professors are a great reference for getting a job after graduation.

10. If you went to a big high school, your college isn't much bigger

Rider University

There are about 1,000 students per class, so only around 300-400 more students than you graduated high school with.

11. Your school doesn't have all of the big sports, like football

Jamie Lewkowitz

But hey, at least we're still undefeated!

12. When you get into your major classes, you always have the same people in them

13. You can't find anything with your school's logo on it, so constantly buy more apparel from the bookstore

Rider University

You walk out of there $100 poorer with a new sweatshirt, mug, and sweatpants that you didn't need.

14. You get really excited when someone has actually heard of your school

Giphy

Related Content

Facebook Comments