15 Typewriter Quotes For The Free Souls

15 Typewriter Quotes For The Free Souls

Words for thought.
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They say a picture speaks a thousand words, but sometimes so does a good quote. We often find ourselves sifting through endless quotes to find one that suites our particular mood or current situation. Not only can reading the words of someone else be comforting, but it may also help guide you through your life. These 15 typewriter quotes are perfect for all of the free souls out there.


1. "She is just some wild thing. Let her laugh, live, love, and roam free on her own terms, and she is sure to come back to you."

2."That crazed girl improvising her music, her poetry, dancing upon the shore... that girl I declare a beautiful lofty thing, or a thing heroically lost, heroically found."

3. "Darling, you are a work of art."

4. "You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body."

5. "I'm going to make everything around me beautiful - that will be my life."

6. "Live, travel, adventure, bless, and don't be sorry."

7. "I stretched my arms out to the side as I walked, as if a wider arm span could catch all of the beautiful vivacity of the day."

8. "Live in the sunshine, swim in the sea, drink the wild air."

9. "There is a sun within every person"

10. "Sometimes people are beautiful. Not in looks. Not in what they say. Just in what they are."

11. "Like wildflowers, you must allow yourself to grow in all the places people never thought you would."

12. "Drink from the well of your self and begin again."

13. "I want to feel my life while I'm in it."

15. "Nobody has measured, even the poets, how much a heart can hold."


Cover Image Credit: Jenna Rutkey

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Sorry I'm A Size 00

But I'm not really sorry.
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My whole life I’ve been thin—which is kind of an understatement. Every time I go to the doctor I get the same “you’re underweight” lecture that I’ve heard every year since I was able to form memories. I’ve never really felt insecure about my weight, I love being able to eat everything and not gain a single pound. Since my freshman year of high school I’ve probably only gained 8 pounds and I’m now a sophomore in college. Of course, in school, there were rumors that I was anorexic or bulimic, but everyone who knew me knew that was far from the truth. I’m now 19, 5’2, and I still have yet to break 100 pounds on the scale. It seems that there is a lot of skinny shaming going around and to me, one of the main contributors to that is the Dove Real Beauty campaign.

You’re probably wondering where I’m going with this because skinny girls get all the praise and other body types are neglected. That’s really not true, though. While loving other body types, you are tearing down skinny girls. Why is it okay to do that to skinny girls but not to other body types? Why is it okay to say “only dogs like bones” or say “every body type is beautiful” until you see a model's abs, or ribs, or thigh gap and then tear them down because they’re “unnaturally” skinny?



The point I’m trying to make is that, as a naturally skinny girl, I have never shamed anyone for their body type, yet I go every day and get at least two comments about my weight. I’m always the skinny girl, the toothpick, but I’m not Jessica. Yeah, I’m a size 00. Get over it. If you have an issue with my body and feel like my body is disgusting to you, don’t look at it. I know that I’m healthy and I don’t need your input when my body just naturally burns calories fast. I don’t have an eating disorder and never have. I am real beauty though, and I know that because I’m comfortable in my own skin. So maybe the real issue is that we as a society have been shoving certain body types down our daughters’ throats so they begin to romanticize models that have certain standards that they have to meet, who work hard for the bodies that they have, and are making a hell of a lot more money than most of the people discussing why they look emaciated while what they’re actually looking at is the photoshopped product.

I’m not going to apologize for being skinny when that is just how my body is, I can’t help it. So please, stop tearing my body down while trying to bring your body up. You can praise your body without shaming skinny girls. Shaming me for being thin does not make you better than the man that shamed your body, just as me shaming you for being curvy does not make me better than the man that shamed my body. As women, we need to love each other because we are the only ones who truly understand each other.


Cover Image Credit: Victoria's Secret Untouched

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What ANAD Means To Me

Recovery is worth it!

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I was only about a week shy of my fifteenth birthday when I was formally diagnosed with anorexia nervosa. A week after that birthday, I was emitted to CHOP to begin refeeding and treatment. Throughout the next five years, I struggled to fully recover from my eating disorder.

I relapsed twice. My weight was never truly stable. I dabbled in other disordered eating and compulsive exercise behaviors. I abused my body. I stunted my growth. I lost my period and compromised by reproductive abilities. I was formally diagnosed with osteoporosis at only twenty years old after fracturing both of my femoral heads and pelvis while running.

No matter how difficult things got, I never gave up fighting for my physical and mental health. I am proud to announce that I have now officially been recovered for one whole year. Although I still have that nagging voice that lingers in the back of my mind and I consciously have to choose recovery every day, it gets easier as time goes on. My thoughts and feelings around my body image, exercise, and food are maturing as I continue to discover my healthy balance.

Anorexia nervosa (along with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder later down the road) took a very physical and mental toll on me, and I know they have done and currently are doing the same to many others. Unfortunately, eating disorders will continue to affect even more people throughout the future. It is because of these reasons that I find the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD) to be so important.

ANAD has a mission to support individuals and family members affected by eating disorders. The organization provides support groups, mentors, and educational resources for schools and communities. Through its programs, ANAD promotes recover and aims to improve body image, acceptance, and positivity.

This year, I am helping to raise money for ANAD through two events at West Chester University. At both of these events, I will be sharing my story and explaining how anorexia nervosa (along with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder) affected my life.

Everything happens for a reason. I truly believe that the reason I went through the struggles I did with my eating disorders was so I can raise awareness of what they are, the consequences, and motivate others to keep fighting. I know that the statement is kind of cliche, but it's true, so I am going to say it anyway: recovery is worth it!

If you are or know someone who may be struggling with an eating disorder, please don't be afraid to ask for help. There is absolutely nothing to be ashamed of or embarrassed about. For more information, check out the ANAD or NEDA websites.

Also, feel free to check out and follow my Instagram page @fightforlifelauren to see what my life is like in recovery (but mostly just pictures of the food I eat with recipes).

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