In high school, I decided to major in pre-medical studies. Though I now have chosen a different career path, the things I went through and learned for almost two years might help you get through all four.

1. Organization is a big deal.

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It's how you'll keep up with assignments, exams and extracurriculars. All of which are crucial things if you're hoping to get into medical school.

2. Attend pre-medical school fairs early.

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Even if you don't make any connections the first year or two, at least you won't have jitters before you attend when it really counts.

3. Have a study schedule.

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College is new and wonderful and exciting, but if you don't pay close attention, you might accidentally let your social life ruin your academic life.

4. Know how you study best.

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Your neighbor or your best friend might study one way that gets them As, but that way will likely not work for you. Look up study skills online, try some out in your first couple weeks and then eventually choose the best fit. I know some students who still have not found a productive way to study in their sophomore year, and it is strongly affecting their GPAs.

5. Take some "me" time.

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Find a club or a friend group or just some hobby that you love and has nothing to do with your pre-medical career. You'll need an escape from it on occasion.

6. If you're shy, you'll need to work on that immediately.

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To find someone to shadow, interview for an internship or simply ask for help in a class, you need to be fearless when talking to superiors. If not, it could very well be the difference between going to medical school and having to focus on plan B.

7. Sleep, mental and physical health need to be a priority.

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"I'll sleep when I'm dead" is some serious bullcrap. Do you really think that if you're sleep-deprived you're going to pass that big exam?

8. Keep in check with yourself.

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Is this still what you really wanna do? Is it truly your passion? Are you able to accomplish this goal while staying healthy? These are all questions you need to have on your mind. There is no harm in dropping the major if it becomes too much and definitely no shame. Maybe someday it will be the right time, but maybe that's not right now.

These are all things I wish I would've truly realized before I began my pre-medical career. Maybe I would've made it through. Or maybe, at least, I would've saved myself the wasted time on something I didn't truly love.