A Thank You to USC

A Thank You to USC

An Evacuated College of Charleston Student Says, "Thanks" to the University of South Carolina.
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On the morning of October 5th I and about 49 other students from the College of Charleston were ushered onto a set of buses sent to the University of South Carolina to evacuate the coastline in preparation for Hurricane Matthew. We were originally preparing to leave for Clemson University, but the massive influx of students from around the state directed there prompted President Harris Pastides of USC to accept the CofC and MUSC students to their campus instead. After almost five hours on the bus, thanks to the reversal of I-26 (making us appreciate travelling the shorter distance to USC over Clemson), we emerged onto the USC campus to the cheers of an extremely warm and welcoming student body.

From the outset the staff at the University were extremely kind and helpful, making sure to keep the drowsy evacuee students accommodated, comfortable and relaxed. What began as an extremely stressful situation turned into a pleasant chance to experience the city of Columbia and the USC campus. We were all placed in student housing, given meal vouchers to act as student meal swipes at the on campus dining halls and offered access to a variety of the school’s student facilities such as the library and recreational rooms. This allowed us ample time to get to know the school and its community while also tending to any work that we may have brought along for the evacuation.

The USC students, both in the dormitories and out in the city of Columbia, were almost all exceedingly friendly. Any questions that I had were often answered promptly and clearly, and whenever a student learned that my companions and I were students from College of Charleston we found ourselves faced with open curiosity and well-wishing. I often ended up conversation where I would usually be marching off to class or ignoring any crowds around me. Several others students from CofC agreed, all of us noticing the same feeling of openness and the effort put into making us feel at home.

On top of fulfilling our basic necessities and giving us generous room and board, the University of South Carolina went above and beyond to give us distractions from the hectic evacuation and concern over Hurricane Matthew. A small group of us received free tickets to the school’s performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” which was executed with a passionate flair and a gothic flourish that made the entire play extremely enjoyable from start to finish. The day before we left the entire group of evacuated students was given tickets to the football game against the Georgia Bulldogs, which, for many of us, was our first taste of college football (CofC doesn't have a football team). It was an exciting and uproarious event and something for which I cannot begin to show enough gratitude.

During a time of crisis and hectic evacuation the University of South Carolina showed welcoming generosity to a group of confused and concerned students from College of Charleston and worked hard to make sure we felt right at home. While many people suffered damages and anxiety over the storm we were fortunate enough to be given a chance to breathe -- safe from the storm’s landfall. I am grateful to the students and staff at USC for their hard work and friendliness, and am now convinced that our schools are strengthened by relationships such as these.

Cover Image Credit: artsandsciences.sc.edu

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5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
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Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

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The Danger Of Future Tripping

Making small goals can help you achieve a better tomorrow.

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The future is mysterious. Because of this elusive, unknown timeline we all face, why shouldn't we spend our time daydreaming of our distant goals and desires? These dreams have a tendency to taunt us in our seemingly boring present life. But it feels so wonderful to visualize ourselves in a better, distant state of absolute satisfaction and fulfillment in all aspects of our future. This visual that we create of a happier, healthier, and stronger self, is what we consider to be our ending goal; our definition of success.

So what is future tripping, and why is it detrimental to our future success and present satisfaction with our lives? According to Healthyplace.com future tripping is a "human condition of peering into the imagined future and anticipating the outcome," but what's wrong with visualizing our "perfect" future career, future lifestyle, and future home, with a wood burning stove and all? Well, before I completely bash visualizing a "better" you, I have to give it credit because it gives you a motivator. The issue is that people, including myself, get so caught up in what we want rather than what we need to do to achieve this version of ourselves and our life.

If we were to only focus on our ending goal, we are creating an existence of madness, and impatience. We need to begin making smaller goals and smaller effort in an effort to become better. A peer of mine said something the other day that struck home. In my own words, he said, "You can only be better than the person you were yesterday." What a simple, achievable goal to work on daily. It sets the bar low, making it easier to feel satisfied as you lie in bed at night and think, "What did I do today that made me a better me than yesterday?" In making these small, easily achievable goals daily, you are working towards this future "self" you wish to become. In other words, you must walk before you can run.

The sooner we begin rewiring our consciousness to confront our current life, self, and mini goals, the more attainable and realistic our far-off goals will become. Each day must be lived, that is a fact. If we are always thinking about tomorrow, or a year from now, or decades from now, we are wasting the precious opportunities of living, exploring, and growing that today offers. If we continue to romanticize and future trip, our levels of current satisfaction will begin to plateau.

I'd like to add and reiterate, that it is good to plan, and that it is good to have an overarching goal to work towards. College presents a perfect environment for structuring your goals (career/life path), and giving you daily errands (homework) that slowly, but surely, take you closer to your desired outcome.

So I hope that in reading this, you will start to catch yourself from future tripping in those moments of current disappointment and make a goal to make tomorrow better.

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