Tesla Crash And Self-Driving Cars: Solution Or Problem?

Tesla Crash And Self-Driving Cars: Solution Or Problem?

New technologies can bring both solutions and problems.
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With the constant introduction of new stuff into our everyday lives, it’s easy to get excited about new technologies and opportunities without thinking about the possible flaws or problems that come along with these new technologies.

One of the most recent technological advances are semi-autonomous cars -- or cars who drive themselves. Recently, there was a car accident that the auto industry knew was bound to happen, but feared. On May 7, Joshua D. Brown died in an accident in Williston, Fla. He was driving a Tesla Model "S" and using it in semi-autonomous, or "autopilot," mode. The car's cameras failed to differentiate the white side of a turning tractor-trailer from a bright, light colored sky and didn’t activate its brakes. Brown didn’t activate the breaks either.

Automakers and analysts have spoken about the need to be cautious when introducing more semi-autonomous features, like automatic braking and adaptive cruise control. It’s easy for people to quickly become dependent on these features and assume they work better than they actually do. The developers and workers in this particular auto industry were always concerned about the possibility of an accident like Brown’s.

Bryant Walker Smith, a law professor at the University of Southern Carolina and expert on autonomous driving issues spoke about the understanding of these new technologies. “For years people have been saying that the technology is ready and it’s one of my pet peeves, because no it’s not,” he said.

Tesla has stressed the newness of the autopilot system, declaring that drivers have to manually enable it and “must maintain control and responsibility for your vehicle” while the system is in use. Tesla released a statement saying, “Autopilot is getting better all the time, but it is not perfect and still requires the driver to remain alert.”

Karl Brauer, a senior analyst at Kelley Blue Book, spoke about the consequences of this accident for Tesla’s reputation. “They have been touting their safety and they have been touting their advanced technology. This situation flies in the face of both,” he said.

There is still much skepticism regarding semi-autonomous and autonomous driving, but maybe that’s not such a bad thing. Walker Smith spoke about the inevitability of a car crash involving these self-driving technologies. This accident can help to bring forward a necessary discussion of regulations on this technology and its future limitations. Smith also said that it would be unfortunate if this accident turned the public’s opinion to be against driver-less cars and the potential for these cars to save lives.

When it comes to new technologies, it’s important to be somewhat cautious about them but to also remain open minded. The potential of these driver-less cars to save lives is amazing, and the public should not become closed-minded to this technology because of this accident, but rather maintain awareness of its limitations. Technology will never be perfect and we cannot depend and rely on it to be. Smith summarized his thoughts by saying, “Driving today is dangerous... Every solution creates its own set of problems."

Cover Image Credit: http://fortune.com/2016/01/12/tesla-nissan-self-parking/

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5 Games To Play In School That They Never Block

You used to play these games in school, and so did everyone you know.
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Even though some games were blocked on the school's internet, these games were not (for most people) and we used it to our full advantage. Also, one of the pictures on this article will take you to the actual game itself, it is up to you to find it. Good Luck!

1. Poptropica

This game was always so fun but 99% of the time I would only play on spy island.

2. QWOP

This is the source of misbehavior in schools because this game was so aggravating.

3. playretrogames

This entire website was never blocked so it was constantly being played on the computer.

4. CoolMath

Again, an entire gaming website that was never blocked and had what was honestly some really fun casual games.

5. The Impossible Quiz

THIS NEEDS TO DIE

If you are kids are in school and looking for some fun during the day, these websites are almost never blocked by the school's wifi. (Just don't get caught). I hope you enjoyed this article and if you did please feel free to follow myself and the Anderson Universtiy page and I will see you all next time, bye!

Cover Image Credit: Rico Tec Solution

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Media Literacy Is Crucial In 2018

Among the world of "fake news" and unrestricted publishing platforms, media literacy is more than just important – it's crucial.

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No concept is more relevant in modern-day news media than the concept of "fake news." While it was originally coined by President Trump referring to a number of liberal media organizations, the term has now been adopted by many Americans when speaking about the phenomenon of factually inaccurate or falsely skewed articles, broadcasts, or any other form of news information.

As a journalism major, the threat of fake news and other challenges to the free press are given as warnings quite frequently. It's a concept my classmates and I are constantly on the lookout for in every piece of news disseminated, whether it comes from CNN, Fox News, Buzzfeed or anywhere else. However, I've learned that others not affiliated or familiar with the press aren't as concerned about fake news – or even just dishonest news – as we are. And that ignorance can pose a huge risk.

Take, for example, "Pizzagate." A series of absolutely fabricated stories in 2016 claimed the Clintons were housing a child sex trafficking/pedophilia ring in the basement of a Washington, D.C. pizza restaurant, causing a man to barge in the restaurant and fire gunshots to save the made-up victims. No one was hurt in his "raid," but the debacle proved that the dissemination of fake news has real consequences.

Illiterate media skills can not only instigate crimes and violent acts such as the ones mentioned above, but they also disadvantage citizens on a much more personal level, too. Most people don't even stop and question whether their source of news/information is credible, much less accurate – they just see a compelling headline or one that supports their beliefs and they hit share, risking spreading false facts, inaccurate information, and skewed biases around their community. The information produced by news media organizations on television, print, and online all plays a drastic part in how someone shapes their worldview, personal beliefs, political opinions, and even more.

Advances in technology have made it so basically anyone can produce media and disseminate it to the public, regardless of whether the information is true or false and what ulterior motives they might have. This means that that article you shared on Facebook last week could come from anybody – not someone who's an expert in the subject discussed or a real reporter. Just your average "Joe Schmo" could be telling you about the government, public issues, or foreign affairs. That person can make up an entire story, event, quote, or belief for any reason at all.

Developing media literacy skills goes further than dispelling fake news – it helps people critically think and analyze stories, helps them express their own opinions, and satisfies everyone's civic responsibility to make well-informed, well-represented decisions. (Not to mention, it also saves us from the embarrassment of sharing an article/piece of information only to have someone comment that it's not true.)

So do all journalists a favor and stop to think after you read an article before you share or comment. Make sure you're being informed by an objective, credible source. Confirm that the news presented is of factual basis, not just of someone's opinion or retelling. Think about that source's intent or purpose behind sharing the particular piece of news. Try and realize the source's and your own point of view in relation to the story. Asking yourself these questions when analyzing pieces of media reassures that you're not being swayed or fooled by "fake news" and prevents your community from being affected, too.

Don't be afraid to fact-check what others tell you or content shared by your friends online. I'm proud to admit that I have been that annoying individual to comment and let someone know that what they've shared is fake, or at least inaccurate.

The role of news media in society is to empower the informed through accurate, fair, and responsible reporting that is free from commercial or government censorship. Many refer to journalism as the "voice for the voiceless" that has a duty to express all aspects of our society and make sure citizens are aware of their rights.

"Fake news" is a major threat to the media's responsibility to the public. Any form of dishonest reporting, whether it's falsifying facts or quotes, intentionally leaving out a side of the story, or publishing information with an ulterior motive or agenda – ALL of this poses a great threat to not only the media but to every citizen as well. And in this day and age where anyone can produce content, true or false, it's more important than ever to learn how to critically consume the news. Media literacy is not just a good skill to have or important – it's crucial.

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