Summer Bucket List For Tulsa, OK

Summer Bucket List For Tulsa, OK

Don't be bored this summer.
358
views

The stress of the end of the semester is hitting students all over the world. It's time to focus on finals and do our best to keep our grades up. Luckily, summer is right around the corner! As summer quickly approaches, it's time to decide what we are going to fill our summer days doing. We want to make sure our days are packed with fun before we go back to reality in the fall. Are you worried about being bored? Have no fear! If you live in Tulsa, Oklahoma, I have the perfect summer bucket list for you!

1. Josh's Sno Shack

There's nothing better than cooling off from the summer heat by enjoying one of the many flavors of sno cones you can find at Josh's Sno Shack. My personal favorite is the Summer Lovin' that is cranberry, lemon and peach.

2. Tulsa Zoo

What's better than reliving your childhood memories and taking a trip to the zoo? It's the perfect idea for a family day during the summer. Go see the variety of incredible animals the zoo has to offer. Visit the petting zoo and see the animals up close.

3. Philbrook Museum of Art

If you want to have an educational day, visit the Philbrook Museum of Art. They have amazing pieces of artwork and their garden is breathtaking. Their garden is the perfect place to take summer pictures.

4. Cain's Ballroom

Have some fun this summer by going to a concert. This is a great experience to go see one of your favorite bands or discover new bands! This iconic venue in Tulsa never fails to disappoint.

5. Gypsy Coffee House

Visiting local coffee houses this summer is the perfect way to meet new people. What's better than meeting new people while you get to drink great coffee? My personal favorite is to just keep it simple and get an iced vanilla latte.

6. Big Splash Water Park

Do you need a way to cool off this summer? Go visit Big Splash Water Park! Even if you're not a fan of big water slides, go float in the lazy river over and over again. They have different areas for every age and a variety of pools to enjoy.

7. Oklahoma Aquarium

If it's super hot outside, the Oklahoma Aquarium is the perfect place to still have fun while you're inside. They have a great collection of sea creatures that you definitely will want to check out.

8. Turkey Mountain

If you like hiking, biking, running and exploring then you should spend the day at Turkey Mountain. Enjoy the great outdoors and the beautiful view.

9. Center of the Universe

If you've never gone to check out the Center of the Universe, you have to at least go see it once. It's a concrete circle that comes with a legend. According to the legend, if you stand in the circle, the people outside of the circle can't here what you say. Go test it and see if the legend is true.

10. Guthrie Green

You definitely have to visit Guthrie Green many times during the summer. They are always having fun events like concerts, workouts, food trucks and movies in the park. Day and night there is always something going on.

11. Utica Square

Who doesn't love a little retail therapy? Go visit Utica Square for all of your fashion needs. They have a variety of high end stores that you can spend all your money in.

12. Tulsa Drillers

The perfect way to spend a summer day is to watch America's favorite pastime: baseball. Go to ONEOK field and watch a game of baseball. If the game ends at night they usually end the game with a great firework show.

13. Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge

The Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge is the perfect place to go bowling. It's a retro-inspired tribute to the classic bowling alleys of the 1970s in the heart of Tulsa's Blue Dome District.

14. Woodward Park

Spend the day in this public park and botanical garden. It's a great place to spend the day with nature. If you like to take pictures, this is a great place for that!

15. Golden Driller

The Golden Driller is one of the tallest statues in America. All Tulsans know about this statue that you definitely can't miss. It is one of the icons of Tulsa. It's a symbol of the International Petroleum Exposition.

Cover Image Credit: Nick and Colie

Popular Right Now

Your Wait time At Theme Parks Is Not Unfair, You're Just Impatient

Your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself.

27362
views

Toy Story Land at Disney's Hollywood Studios "unboxed" on June 30, 2018. My friend and I decided to brave the crowds on opening day. We got to the park around 7 AM only to find out that the park opened around 6 AM. Upon some more scrolling through multiple Disney Annual Passholder Facebook groups, we discovered that people were waiting outside the park as early as 1 AM.

We knew we'd be waiting in line for the bulk of the Toy Story Land unboxing day. There were four main lines in the new land: the line to enter the land; the line for Slinky Dog Dash, the new roller coaster; the line for Alien Spinning Saucers, the easier of the new rides in the land; Toy Story Mania, the (now old news) arcade-type ride; and the new quick-service restaurant, Woody's Lunchbox (complete with grilled cheese and "grown-up drinks").

Because we were so early, we did not have to wait in line to get into the land. We decided to ride Alien Spinning Saucers first. The posted wait time was 150 minutes, but my friend timed the line and we only waited for 50 minutes. Next, we tried to find the line for Slinky Dog Dash. After receiving conflicting answers, the runaround, and even an, "I don't know, good luck," from multiple Cast Members, we exited the land to find the beginning of the Slinky line. We were then told that there was only one line to enter the park that eventually broke off into the Slinky line. We were not about to wait to get back into the area we just left, so we got a Fastpass for Toy Story Mania that we didn't plan on using in order to be let into the land sooner. We still had to wait for our time, so we decided to get the exclusive Little Green Man alien popcorn bin—this took an entire hour. We then used our Fastpass to enter the land, found the Slinky line, and proceeded to wait for two and a half hours only for the ride to shut down due to rain. But we've come this far and rain was not about to stop us. We waited an hour, still in line and under a covered area, for the rain to stop. Then, we waited another hour and a half to get on the ride from there once it reopened (mainly because they prioritized people who missed their Fastpass time due to the rain). After that, we used the mobile order feature on the My Disney Experience app to skip part of the line at Woody's Lunchbox.

Did you know that there is actually a psychological science to waiting? In the hospitality industry, this science is the difference between "perceived wait" and "actual wait." A perceived wait is how long you feel like you are waiting, while the actual wait is, of course, the real and factual time you wait. There are eight things that affect the perceived wait time: unoccupied time feels longer than occupied time, pre-process waits feel longer than in-process waits, anxiety makes waits feel longer, uncertain waits are longer than certain waits, unexplained waits are longer than explained waits, unfair waits are longer than equitable waits, people will wait longer for more valuable service and solo waiting feels longer than group waiting.

Our perceived wait time for Alien Spinning Saucers was short because we expected it to be longer. Our wait for the popcorn seemed longer because it was unoccupied and unexplained. Our wait for the rain to stop so the ride could reopen seemed shorter because it was explained. Our wait between the ride reopening and getting on the coaster seemed longer because it felt unfair for Disney to let so many Fastpass holders through while more people waited through the rain. Our entire wait for Slinky Dog Dash seemed longer because we were not told the wait time in the beginning. Our wait for our food after placing a mobile order seemed shorter because it was an in-process wait. We also didn't mind wait long wait times for any of these experiences because they were new and we placed more value on them than other rides or restaurants at Disney. The people who arrived at 1 AM just added five hours to their perceived wait

Some non-theme park examples of this science of waiting in the hospitality industry would be waiting at a restaurant, movie theater, hotel, performance or even grocery store. When I went to see "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom," the power went out in the theater right as we arrived. Not only did we have to wait for it to come back and for them to reset the projectors, I had to wait in a bit of anxiety because the power outage spooked me. It was only a 30-minute wait but felt so much longer. At the quick-service restaurant where I work, we track the time from when the guest places their order to the time they receive their food. Guests in the drive-thru will complain about 10 or more minute waits, when our screens tell us they have only been waiting four or five minutes. Their actual wait was the four or five minutes that we track because this is when they first request our service, but their perceived wait begins the moment they pull into the parking lot and join the line because this is when they begin interacting with our business. While in line, they are experiencing pre-process wait times; after placing the order, they experience in-process wait times.

Establishments in the hospitality industry do what they can to cut down on guests' wait times. For example, theme parks offer services like Disney's Fastpass or Universal's Express pass in order to cut down the time waiting in lines so guests have more time to buy food and merchandise. Stores like Target or Wal-Mart offer self-checkout to give guests that in-process wait time. Movie theaters allow you to check in and get tickets on a mobile app and some quick-service restaurants let you place mobile or online orders. So why do people still get so bent out of shape about being forced to wait?

On Toy Story Land unboxing day, I witnessed a woman make a small scene about being forced to wait to exit the new land. Cast Members were regulating the flow of traffic in and out of the land due to the large crowd and the line that was in place to enter the land. Those exiting the land needed to wait while those entering moved forward from the line. Looking from the outside of the situation as I was, this all makes sense. However, the woman I saw may have felt that her wait was unfair or unexplained. She switched between her hands on her hips and her arms crossed, communicated with her body language that she was not happy. Her face was in a nasty scowl at those entering the land and the Cast Members in the area. She kept shaking her head at those in her group and when allowed to proceed out of the land, I could tell she was making snide comments about the wait.

At work, we sometimes run a double drive-thru in which team members with iPads will take orders outside and a sequencer will direct cars so that they stay in the correct order moving toward the window. In my experience as the sequencer, I will inform the drivers which car to follow, they will acknowledge me and then still proceed to dart in front of other cars just so they make it to the window maybe a whole minute sooner. Not only is this rude, but it puts this car and the cars around them at risk of receiving the wrong food because they are now out of order. We catch these instances more often than not, but it still adds stress and makes the other guests upset. Perhaps these guests feel like their wait is also unfair or unexplained, but if they look at the situation from the outside or from the restaurant's perspective, they would understand why they need to follow the blue Toyota.

The truth of the matter is that your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself. We all want instant gratification, I get it. But in reality, we have to wait for some things. It takes time to prepare a meal. It takes time to experience a ride at a theme park that everyone else wants to go on. It takes time to ring up groceries. It takes patience to live in this world.

So next time you find yourself waiting, take a minute to remember the difference between perceived and actual wait times. Think about the eight aspects of waiting that affect your perceived wait. Do what you can to realize why you are waiting or keep yourself occupied in this wait. Don't be impatient. That's no way to live your life.

Cover Image Credit:

Aranxa Esteve

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

A Response to the proposed 3 californias, from a californian

The proposed "3 Californias" Bill is a joke, and not a very funny one.

77
views

The proposed "3 Californias" Bill is a joke, and not a very funny one.

On November 6, 2018, the people of California will be voting. However, on this election day there will be something very new on the ballot: a proposal to split up California into 3 different states. The California we all know and love would be separated into 3 different states. Under this Bill the 3 states would be California, Northern California, and Southern California. Although many Californians can exaggerate and joke about the differences between the Northern and Southern parts of the state, most people would not want this official division.

This isn't the first time a variation of this Bill has been proposed. In 2013, venture capitalist, Tim Draper proposed a Bill that would separate California into 6 different states. However, this Bill did not receive enough support and never made it to the Ballot in 2016. A good majority of Californians saw this Bill as a joke. Why on earth would you want to separate 1 state into 6 pieces?

A few years later Tim Draper decided to revamp his failed Bill, this time with only splitting California into 3 pieces. With this revision, the Bill gained enough support to be on the ballot in 2018, which is how we ended up in this predicament.

Image result for 3 californias

So, why? Why exactly should we split our beloved state into 3 pieces? Tim Draper believes that California, as it is right now, is too large and therefore ungovernable. With so many counties and social landscapes, it is too difficult to address the needs of the state given its vast size and population.

I'll give Tim Draper this point. California is massive. Being the third biggest state by land and the state with the largest population, California has a lot to deal with. However, Draper has a hidden agenda, just like most politicians.

Draper's hidden agenda involves lessening California's political power. California has 55 electoral votes, the most of any other state due to its large population size. As a presidential candidate, winning California is a big deal. In the 21st century, California has been a key state for the Democratic Party. When taking a closer look at how Draper proposes splitting California, you see why this Bill is a problem.

Image result for 3 californias

Based on the map, the proposed 3 new states would be generally more even when it comes to past political party voting. Election races would become more competitive and close based on the how the borders of the states are drawn. By doing this, Draper is making it easier for the Republican Party. Additionally, this proposed plan is taking away California's political power. No longer would the state have 55 electoral votes. Rather, the 3 California's would become just like the rest of the states, not as a big of a win.

California is beloved because it has everything. From beaches to mountains, from large metropolitan areas to small rural towns, California has it all. Why would we divide the state when being whole is what makes it great?

The "3 Californias" Bill isn't just bad for the Democratic Party, but for all Californians.

Whether you're a Democrat or a Republican, we're all Californians. Let's keep it that way.

Cover Image Credit:

Caitlin O'Leary

Related Content

Facebook Comments