Standing Up To POTS At Wittenberg

Standing Up To POTS At Wittenberg

Wittenberg University has made an effort to raise awareness about this disease around campus.

Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is one of a group of disorders that have orthostatic intolerance (OI) as their primary symptoms. It’s when an excessively reduced volume of blood returns to the heart after an individual stands up from a lying-down position. Some symptoms of POTS include fainting, migraines, and lightheadedness. These symptoms can be relieved by laying down again. Anyone at any age can develop POTS, but the majority of individuals who are affected (between 75 and 80 percent) are women between the 15 to 50 years of age.

Wittenberg University has made an effort to raise awareness about this disease around campus through the “Standing Up To POTS 5K.” The Pre-Health Professionals Club is teaming up with Dr. Pederson to bring the event to Wittenberg this year. Dr. Pederson’s daughter has POTS, which makes this disease hit even closer to home here at Wittenberg. The 5K seeks to raise $10,000 for Dr. Pederson’s nonprofit of the same name. The 5K is on April 9th and it starts at the Student Center.

This nonprofit provides a wealth of information about POTS and the people who it affects. It explains the tell-tale signs of POTS such as the symptoms explained above. Additionally, it provides information about treating these symptoms through the best medicines, advice about dieting, taking actions to avoid fainting and lightheadedness, responsibly exercising, and where to find counseling for the emotional struggles that this disease can cause. It also catalogs published research about POTS, which allows those who don’t know much about the disease to learn important facts about it.

Cover Image Credit:

Popular Right Now

The New Era of the Period

You Know You Want to Know

We've all heard of them. Whether you're totally disgusted, intimidated or fascinated, you can't deny, you've definitely been curious about them. Well, here's what it's all about in seven brutally honest steps.

1. Reading the instructions.

This looks so easy. I totally have this. I just need to fold it like this. All right. Here we go.

2. Putting it in.

How the actual fuck am I supposed to get this in my body. I literally cannot. Maybe if I fold it like this...? NOPE. NOPE. NOPE. ABORT. I've been in this restroom for a solid ten minutes. I just need to shove it up there at this point. Okay. Here we go.

3. It's in.

Wow. This is great. I feel nothing. Watch me do this split just because I can. Holy fucking yes. I need to tell everyone about this. Everyone needs to know. My body is a temple. I am freaking Wonder Woman. NOTHING CAN STOP ME!!!!

4. Taking it out.

Okay so I just pull this spout and "gently pull." This is grea---where. the. fuckity. is. the. spout. I can't find it. Oh, there it is.

5. It's not coming out.

I CANNOT get this out.

6. Mental breakdown.

I'm going to have to birth this out. I can't get it. This is bad. This is really really bad. It's up there forever. I'm going to have to go to the ER to get someone to pull this thing out of me. FOR THE LOVE OF GOD. I have to call my mom. She always knows what to do. No answer. I need to go to the ER. I can't get this out. I'm crying right now.

7. Celebration.

Wow. It's out. I'm so glad that I didn't actually go to the ER to have someone pull this out. I feel so free. I am never going back to tampons again. This is incredible. I'm saving the planet. I'm saving so much money. Just gonna pop this back in now. I am a new woman. HERE I COME WORLD.

Cover Image Credit: wikimedia

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

I Looked Out The Window, And Here's What I Saw: A Tribute To JSU

I look out the window, and I see home.

I looked out the window, and I saw a sunrise as my alarm clock rang in my ears and beat on my eardrums. I see the tall buildings that stand carved with Greek architectural designs. I see students making their way to class, by car, by foot, by bike; whether they are trying anxiously to make it on time, or they are trying to take their time. I looked out the window, and I saw a normal day at Jacksonville State University.

I looked out the window and saw a storm brewing. It seems like everything is suspiciously calm before disaster hits; perhaps that’s why they call it “the calm before a storm”. I looked out the window, and I saw the sky immersed with ominous, dark clouds. I began to hear the wind howl and the rain tick, harder and harder with minutes passing. I looked out the window and felt worry run through my veins as the weather started to pick up.

I can no longer look out the window because I am out the window. That window is now part of total destruction. I stand outside the window and see my home in pieces. I see glass shattered, trees down, roofs missing. I see my heart breaking as my home away from home is now scattered everywhere. I see faces of distraught, dismay. I see people overwhelmed with emotions as they have lost almost everything, yet can still find it in them to be grateful because they are indeed alive. I see cars totaled. I see those Greek buildings with a chunk taken out of them.

However, outside the window, I see communities coming together. I see people taking others in, giving out donations, doing whatever they can to help us rebuild. I see people putting in overtime to help restore power, buildings, and anything else to ensure the safety of citizens. I see people waking up at the crack of dawn to help with the clean-up of the town. I am reminded of why I chose JSU to begin with.

One day, my window will be back. I will be able to look outside the window and see smiling faces. I will be able to see the sunrise as it reveals a beautiful, reconstructed campus. I will be able to see the sunset as it kisses us goodnight. The bells that ring whenever it hits an hour will be pleasing and not dreadful. I’ll look outside the window, and I’ll see home.

Cover Image Credit: Personal Photo

Related Content

Facebook Comments