The 6 Inevitable Stages And Headaches Of Doing A Group Project, Ranked

The 6 Inevitable Stages And Headaches Of Doing A Group Project, Ranked

We've all done them and we've all hated it.

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If you've ever been a student, elementary, middle, high school, college, whatever, you have probably experienced what I can only describe as a living nightmare: a group project.

Just to make it clear, a group project is a task that three or more students must complete for a grade. The premises of this task can range from a science fair poster board or a presentational short skit on the mechanics of an eyeball. Groups can be randomly formed by the teacher (the usual, more traditional route) or picked by the students themselves (which can result in the end of a friendship if not picked carefully).

Either way, it sucks and either way, you will be experiencing the following…

Finding a time to meet that works for everyone in your group

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There's always that one person who's schedule never syncs up with everyone else's because she absolutely has to wash her cat every other day at exactly 6:03 p.m. to 7:14 p.m. You end up meeting at a very obscure hour on like, a Tuesday only to find out five minutes before you're supposed to meet after you're all at the meeting location, that she needs a ride because she doesn't have a car. You and your other group members just decide to skype call her in or keep her posted via your GroupMe message.

Headache scale: 3/5

That one group member who does the bare minimum to absolutely nothing at all

Quick Meme

Traditionally, this is the same person who needs to wash her cat every day. They do little to no work at all and yet, always seem to have passively aggressive feedback for every member in the group. This person is can go one of two ways:

1) they never respond in the GroupMe and have the chat muted or

2) they overcompensate for their lack of contribution by talking too much in the GroupMe.

This person tends to talk the most during the actual presentation.

Headache scale: 4/5

Opposing views on something

Warner Bros. Pictures

Whether it be the topic you guys are researching or what kind of aesthetic your presentation is going for, there will be opposing views on something but being non-confrontational college students, all parties will be a little too nice about it when arguing for their case.

Headache scale: 2/5

Dividing the group work up fairly

Dos Equis

I really don't need to explain myself on this one. Y'all know what the stress is like making sure you have a good, easy portion but it's also equal in the eyes of the other group members who are probably going to evaluate you at the end of the project.

Headache scale: 3/5

The actual presentation

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If you have to actually present your group project, one or more of the following usually occurs:

1) a member of your group doesn't show up to class that day so you have to reshuffle presentation parts.

2) your presentation isn't loading.

3) you created your presentation on a Mac and the conversion over to a PC screws up the whole aesthetic you all were working so hard on.

4) someone in your group is a terrible public speaker which can dock points off your final grade.

5) you actually don't end up going on that day because the other group projects ran overtime so you and your fellow group members get to stress about it for another 48 hours.

Headache scale: 5/5

Grading and evaluation

AJ+

Getting your scoring sheets back for the group grade and reading the comments and silently blaming your group members for why you lost points (you KNEW you should've gone for your aesthetic but nooo they all had to go with Stacy's dumb idea) For individual grades, you've made sure you congratulated your entire group so you get a good evaluation but then for group evals, you either rip your members a new one by telling it like it is or you chicken out and give them all (even Stacy) a decent review.

Headache scale: 3/5

Moral scale: 4/5

Group projects. Ya gotta love 'em!

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Most Incoming Freshmen Are Only Worried About Making Friends, But I'm Worried About When To Tell My New Friends About My Disability

I shouldn't have to worry about if people are going to accept me for something I can't control.

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Going to college is a big change for anyone and it's a difficult time for a lot of us. It is hard enough being an incoming freshman at a new school, let alone a freshman with a disability.

I never knew how much extra stuff I had to do in order to be able to get the accommodations I need plus all the typical college duties a student has on their plate. I had to fill out an online application to prove my disability, a learning accommodations form, an accommodations form, a Vocational Rehab form, a transportation form, plus the millions of other forms you have to fill out in order to become a student at any college.

It took three hours... It was very overwhelming. And I had to talk to a lot of people about the million forms I filled out without my parents' help.

"Welcome to adulthood," they said.

It happened in the blink of an eye. Besides all the forms, choosing roommates is harder than I thought it was going to be. It's something that most people find nerve-wracking. I have the challenge of not only trying to meet new people in an unfamiliar environment like everyone else but in hopes of being accepted by my peers because of my disability.

At what point do I tell people about my disability? Do I tell them when we are getting to know each other or when we are going to meet up? That's probably the thing I am scared the most about.

I have heard that college students are more accepting of disabilities than most high schoolers, which puts me at ease a little bit.

But people can be really cruel, no matter what age.

I am also realizing as I go through the roommate process that students are not properly informed on disabilities and how to treat others with disabilities. I shouldn't have to worry about if people are going to accept me for something I can't control. Students should be nice and accept people of all different abilities. But it's easier said than done.

Another thing, trying to find a job that will be accommodable to me has been difficult. It seems so easy for a typical college student to get a job, but not me. I have spent the last six months applying for jobs just to hear nothing back from businesses. All I want to do is earn money like everyone else to try and go to college.

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There's that... then there is the typical college student stuff housing, dining, medical forms, transcripts, and student sport passes... It is just a lot for one 18-year-old to handle. The point is, as some of you are going through the same college process, be courteous to your classmates around you.

We are all going through something similar but others may be dealing with a little more or nervous so be kind and understanding.

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I'm A Communications Major Now, And I Have More Opportunities

I am no longer limiting my options.

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I have changed my major more than three different times, and I've heard it all.

"You're clearly uncertain of what you want to do." "You've changed your major too many times." "Where's your 5-year plan?"

First I wanted to be a nurse, then a historian, and then I landed on a journalist. But unlike the first time I changed my major, this doesn't have to do with any anxiety.

Believe me, I know I've had a mid-college crisis or two, but I know that this is what I really want to do. I love writing, I love journalism, but I know that as a communications major, I'll be able to do more than just write for a news outlet.

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After struggling through a few lulls in college, I think this is what's best for me as a person and as a student. I can feel this new major not only fit my life, but it really feels like a new major is going to kick off 2019 for me.

There are definitely a couple of positives to changing my major; I have plenty of support and plenty of options. I no longer feel like I have just a one-way street, I have an intersection.

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