The Emotions And Headaches Of Every Group Project, Ranked

The 6 Inevitable Stages And Headaches Of Doing A Group Project, Ranked

We've all done them and we've all hated it.

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If you've ever been a student, elementary, middle, high school, college, whatever, you have probably experienced what I can only describe as a living nightmare: a group project.

Just to make it clear, a group project is a task that three or more students must complete for a grade. The premises of this task can range from a science fair poster board or a presentational short skit on the mechanics of an eyeball. Groups can be randomly formed by the teacher (the usual, more traditional route) or picked by the students themselves (which can result in the end of a friendship if not picked carefully).

Either way, it sucks and either way, you will be experiencing the following…

Finding a time to meet that works for everyone in your group

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There's always that one person who's schedule never syncs up with everyone else's because she absolutely has to wash her cat every other day at exactly 6:03 p.m. to 7:14 p.m. You end up meeting at a very obscure hour on like, a Tuesday only to find out five minutes before you're supposed to meet after you're all at the meeting location, that she needs a ride because she doesn't have a car. You and your other group members just decide to skype call her in or keep her posted via your GroupMe message.

Headache scale: 3/5

That one group member who does the bare minimum to absolutely nothing at all

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Traditionally, this is the same person who needs to wash her cat every day. They do little to no work at all and yet, always seem to have passively aggressive feedback for every member in the group. This person is can go one of two ways:

1) they never respond in the GroupMe and have the chat muted or

2) they overcompensate for their lack of contribution by talking too much in the GroupMe.

This person tends to talk the most during the actual presentation.

Headache scale: 4/5

Opposing views on something

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Whether it be the topic you guys are researching or what kind of aesthetic your presentation is going for, there will be opposing views on something but being non-confrontational college students, all parties will be a little too nice about it when arguing for their case.

Headache scale: 2/5

Dividing the group work up fairly

Dos Equis

I really don't need to explain myself on this one. Y'all know what the stress is like making sure you have a good, easy portion but it's also equal in the eyes of the other group members who are probably going to evaluate you at the end of the project.

Headache scale: 3/5

The actual presentation

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If you have to actually present your group project, one or more of the following usually occurs:

1) a member of your group doesn't show up to class that day so you have to reshuffle presentation parts.

2) your presentation isn't loading.

3) you created your presentation on a Mac and the conversion over to a PC screws up the whole aesthetic you all were working so hard on.

4) someone in your group is a terrible public speaker which can dock points off your final grade.

5) you actually don't end up going on that day because the other group projects ran overtime so you and your fellow group members get to stress about it for another 48 hours.

Headache scale: 5/5

Grading and evaluation

AJ+

Getting your scoring sheets back for the group grade and reading the comments and silently blaming your group members for why you lost points (you KNEW you should've gone for your aesthetic but nooo they all had to go with Stacy's dumb idea) For individual grades, you've made sure you congratulated your entire group so you get a good evaluation but then for group evals, you either rip your members a new one by telling it like it is or you chicken out and give them all (even Stacy) a decent review.

Headache scale: 3/5

Moral scale: 4/5

Group projects. Ya gotta love 'em!

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To The Defeated Nursing Major, You'll Rise

You'll rise because every single day that you slip on your navy blue scrubs and fling your pretty little stethoscope around your neck, the little girl that you once were with the dream of saving lives someday will be silently nudging you to keep going.

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You will have weeks when you are defeated. Some mornings you won't be able to get out of bed and some days you won't be able to stop crying enough to go to class. You'll feel like nobody understands the stress that you are under, and you have absolutely nobody to talk to because they either don't get it or are dealing with their own meltdowns. There will be weeks that you want to change your major and give up on the whole thing. But, you'll rise.
You will miss football games, concerts, and nights out with the girls. There will be stretches of two or more weeks you'll go without seeing your mom, and months where you have to cancel on your best friend 4+ times because you have too much studying to do. There will be times where no amount of "I'm sorry" can make it up to your little brother when you miss his big football game or your grandparents when you haven't seen them in months. But, you'll rise.

You will have patients who tell you how little they respect nurses and that you won't be able to please no matter how hard you try. You will have professors who seem like their goal is to break you, especially on your bad days. You will encounter doctors who make you feel like the most insignificant person on the planet. You will leave class some days, put your head against your steering wheel and cry until it seems like there's nothing left to cry out. But, you'll rise.

You will fail tests that you studied so hard for, and you will wing some tests because you worked too late the night before. You will watch some of the smartest people you've ever known fail out because they simply aren't good test-takers. You will watch helplessly as your best friend falls apart because of a bad test grade and know that there is absolutely nothing you can do for her. There will be weeks that you just can't crack a smile no matter how hard you try. But, you'll rise.

You'll rise because you have to — because you've spent entirely too much money and effort to give up that easily. You'll rise because you don't want to let your family down. You'll rise because you're too far in to stop now. You'll rise because the only other option is failing, and we all know that nurses do not give up.

You'll rise because you remember how badly you wanted this, just three years ago as you were graduating high school, with your whole world ahead of you. You'll rise because you know there are people that would do anything to be in your position.

You'll rise because you'll have one patient during your darkest week that'll change everything — that'll hug you and remind you exactly why you're doing this, why this is the only thing you can picture yourself doing for the rest of your life.

You'll rise because every single day that you slip on your navy blue scrubs and fling your pretty little stethoscope around your neck, the little girl that you once were with the dream of saving lives someday will be silently nudging you to keep going.

You'll rise because you have compassion, you are selfless, and you are strong. You'll rise because even during the darkest weeks, you have the constant reminder that you will be changing the world someday.

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How To Stay Mentally Healthy In College

Our mental health is just as important as our physical health.

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Staying healthy in college seems really, really hard to do. Classes, friends, clubs, and the whole fact of living by yourself can create a lot of stress and anxiety. Most students, and people in general, don't really know how to deal with stress or how to take care of themselves mentally, leading to unhealthy behaviors physically and mentally. If you don't take care of your mental health, your physical health will suffer eventually. Here are a few tips and tricks to help take care of your mental health:

1. Eat a well-balanced diet

Eating fruits, vegetables, grains, and other healthy foods will help you feel more energized and motivated. Most people associate eating a balanced diet as beneficial for your physical health, but it is just as important for your mental health.

2. Keep a journal and write in it daily

Writing can be one of the most relaxing and stress-relieving things you can do for yourself. Writing down the issues you are struggling with or the problems you are encountering in your life on a piece of paper can help you relax and take a step back from that stress.

3. Do something that brings you joy

Take some time to do something that brings you joy and happiness! It can be really easy to forget about this when you are running around with your busy schedule but make some time to do something you enjoy. Whether it be dancing, writing, coloring, or even running, make some time for yourself.

4. Give thanks

Keeping a gratitude log — writing what brings you joy and happiness — helps to keep you positively minded, which leads to you becoming mentally healthy. Try to write down three things that brought you joy or made you smile from your day.

5. Smile and laugh

Experts say that smiling and laughing help improve your mental health. Not only is it fun to laugh, but laughing also helps you burn calories! There's a reason why smiling and laughing are often associated with happiness and joyful thoughts.

6. Exercise

Staying active and doing exercises that energize your body will help release endorphins and serotonin, which both act as a natural antidepressant. Keeping an active lifestyle will help you stay happy!

7. Talk out your problems

All of us deal with stress and have problems from time to time. The easiest and probably most beneficial way to deal with this stress and anxiety is to talk it out with a close friend, family member, or even a counselor.

8. See a counselor, peer mentor, or psychologist

Just like it was stated in the previous point, it is beneficial to talk out your problems with a counselor. We all have issues, and it is OK to ask for help.

Keeping up your mental health in college can be a struggle, and it may be hard to even admit you are not mentally healthy. This is OK; you are not alone. If you want to see a psychologist or would like to learn more about mental health, there are resources. You can also take a self-assessment of your mental health. If you are struggling with thoughts of suicide, please, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

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