I don't want to smell your weed.

If You Smoke Weed, PLEASE Do It Somewhere Else, I Don't Want To Smell It

I don't want to smoke it so I don't want to smell it either.

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One of the biggest issues is that many people believe that marijuana should be legal in the states. I see people advocating for it all the time on social media. I don't have a problem with them wanting it to be legal. In fact, I really don't care if you smoke it. You do you, boo.

But I have no care to smoke it and I definitely don't want to smell it everywhere I go because you choose to do it all the time.

My first year away at college, I got random roommates, and one of them LOVED to smoke her some weed. As I said, I don't care if other people do it, but it was very irritating to come home from classes every day to the apartment smelling like weed because she smoked in our apartment.

This year, I have moved to a new apartment, and my roommates don't smoke, but our neighbors do. So I'll still come home sometimes and smell weed. Sometimes, I'll even see people in the breezeways/stairwells at our apartment complex.

I also have a job at a fast food restaurant, and a lot of the late night people coming to eat are high. I know this because as soon as they pull up to the drive-thru window or walk inside, all you can smell is weed.

I've never had an interest in smoking weed at all, but again, I don't judge you if that's something you like to do. That is your decision and I'm not going to talk anyone out of it.

But I shouldn't have to come home or go to work and constantly smell your weed.

The smell is nauseating in all honesty and I just don't think it's fair that I kind of get stuck with your decisions because of where you choose to smoke.

Just please be courteous when you choose to smoke. Don't make everyone have to smell it. Just because you like it or aren't bothered by it doesn't mean that other people feel the same way.

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10 Things You Can 100 Percent Relate To If You've Ever Owned A Juul

Just me and my dope clouds.

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The Juul is the gogo-pants, the jelly shoes, the bell-bottom jeans of the late 2010s. The Juul was made for everyone: recovering addicts, 15-year-olds, creepy 30-year-olds who peaked in high school, and lost and misguided college students (honestly, aren't we all). Here are some things you'll definitely agree with if you've ever owned (or lost) a Juul.

1. Parental confusion

There once was a magical time when high schoolers were able to ruin their lungs in the peace and quiet of the school bathroom. There once was a time when teenagers played their Juuls off as "flash drives," "chargers," and "USBs for school." It was a mint pod paradise. But just like the Garden of Eden, there had to be that one person that ruined it for everyone else. At some point, someone snitched. Soon, the dangers of teen vaping took over the nightly news. Before we could stop it, there were PTA meetings and "Moms Against Vaping" bumper stickers.

2. Naming and decorating it

Harboring a nicotine addiction requires a certain level of style and refinery. Everyone knows that Juuls with glitter, skins, and stickers are simply superior to the plain ones. Not all Juuls are created equal. Especially if you give it the name "Juulio," "Ferris Juuler," or "Angelina Juulie". Extra coolness points for "Juulius Ceaser."

3. Fiends

There are some things in life that aren't meant to be shared. Social security numbers, men, toothbrushes, bad poetry you wrote about your crush in high school, the list goes on. The same goes for the Juul. This is how mono happens, people. Leave me and my son alone.

4. The serial number trick

A popular finesse among veteran Juul users is to record the serial number on the front of the Juul and report it "broken" or "lost" on the Juul website. Bada-bing, bada-boom. Free Juul in the mail 3-5 business days later.

5. Being broke

Rent? Electricity? tUiTioN? Who even needs that stuff? Becoming a Juul owner comes with its own fiscal responsibilities, just like a new pet or a child. Expenses vary from pods, juice, chargers, and possibly medical bills.

6. Vape tricks

Chances are, you've sat yourself down at least once and attempted to blow some Os with a YouTube tutorial. It takes time and patience to nail the ghost, the dragon, and the French inhale. No shame.

7. Imposters

There are Phixes, Sourins, Stigs, all kinds of vapes that hopped on the fake Juul bandwagon once the original started gaining real traction in society. Nothing beats the original. You will always be the only one for me, my sweet Juul.

8. Health risks and addiction

Surprise, surprise. Unfortunately, it's been proven by the FDA that the Juul and its like devices pose serious health risks. This comes with a certain level of anxiety when it comes to lung health, and if you've been Juuling for awhile, chances are you pay extra attention to your breathing and sometimes worry about asthma, bronchitis, and more serious lung problems. In all seriousness, it's pretty scary how many people these days play off their nicotine addictions as no big deal.

9. When it gets lost/stolen

I once had this roommate whose worst fear was losing her beloved, special-edition red Juul. One Thursday night, this girl came back from Lion absolutely beside herself, as she was convinced that someone had stolen her prized and rare red Juul. She then spent the remainder of the night weeping and flopping around her bed, and cursing the gods for taking her precious best friend away from her. However, it was discovered the next morning that it actually had been sitting on the coffee table in our living room the whole time. Losing a Juul on a night out is easy due to its size and the likeliness of a frat boy slipping away without giving it back. It happens more than you think.

Pro tip: check the floor of the bar with a flashlight at the end of the night, guaranteed free Juul.

10.  Quitting

All good things must come to an end...until you buy your next one.

Truly, the Juul is a generational pinnacle—one of those things we will smile about driving our kids' carpool to soccer practice in a few years. And though it's mostly done in good fun, take a second to seriously consider if the J is worth it. Be smart, and happy Juuling!

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Stop Demonizing CBD Just Because You Associate It With THC

CBD doesn't get you high, do your research.

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I'm sure you've heard about CBD already, but if not, then let me break it down for you. Cannabidiol, CBD, is one of the hundreds of cannabinoids identified in the cannabis plant, but unlike the THC in the marijuana plant, it doesn't have any psychoactive properties.

CBD doesn't get you high.

When extracted from the plant, CBD has proven to be effective in the medical field. It has shown to be effective in the treatment of epilepsy, in the management of pain, in reducing depression and anxiety, and relieving cancer symptoms, among a host of other uses. New research from Mount Sinai Hospital in New York has revealed that CBD may be beneficial for society as a whole, too.

Researchers at Mount Sinai Hospital conducted the study to understand how we can fight the opioid epidemic through the discovery of alternative treatment options by assessing the potential effects of CBD on craving and anxiety in heroin users.

42 drug abstinent men and women between the ages of 21 and 65, who had recently stopped using heroin, were recruited for the study. Two groups were formed out of the participants: a control group that received a placebo and a test group that received CBD doses ranging from 400 mg to 800 mg per day. After administration, participants were exposed to neutral environmental cues and cues that would be considered drug-use inducing over three sessions. The cues in the environment were tested because an addict's environment and the cues it gives are the strongest triggers for relapse and continued drug use.

The results of the research hold great promise for the future of CBD.

Participants who were in the test group and given CBD had significantly reduced cravings for heroin, and noted feeling less anxiety when exposed to drug-use inducing cues. Moreover, the CBD had a lasting effect on this group as it continued to reduce cravings and relieve anxiety for seven days after the last dose was administered. In essence, this is the most important takeaway from the research: CBD had lasting effects well after it was present in the body. Numerous vital signs like heart rate, skin temperature, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were taken to ensure only objective results were obtained since cravings and anxiety are subjective feelings. Another finding was a reduction in participants' heart rate and salivary cortisol levels, which would have both increased in the presence of anxiety-provoking images.

I think the evidence points to a logical conclusion: CBD is safe, it is effective in treating opioid addictions, and it is beneficial for those who experience a host of issues from pain, to anxiety, to epilepsy or to illnesses. Now is the time to keep pushing for legalization to continue larger scale studies and introduce CBD as a valid treatment option.

"A successful non-opioid medication would add significantly to the existing addiction medication toolbox to help reduce the growing death toll and enormous health care costs." - Yasmin Hurd, director of the Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York.

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