Seahawks 2019 Draft Summary
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The Seattle Seahawks made a few expected and unexpected moves in the 2019 NFL Draft. With only four picks in the draft, many analysts and fans suspected that they would trade down. They did exactly that, trading their first-round selection (21st overall) to the Green Bay Packers in exchange for theirs (30th overall) along with two fourth-round picks (114th and 118th overall). However, they promptly traded their 30th selection to the New York Giants for three picks of theirs (37th, 132nd and 142th overall) and traded the remaining two picks to the Minnesota Vikings and New England Patriots, respectively. In return, they acquired New England's 64th overall selection and Minnesota's 120th and 204th overall picks. However, Seattle's most notable move was acquiring the Kansas City Chiefs' first-round selection (29th overall) while giving them star pass rusher Frank Clark.

Not many expected Ole Miss wide receiver D.K. Metcalf to fall to Seattle at pick 64 at the second round, but the Seahawks snatched him up when they realized he was still available. They also drafted two additional wide receivers in Gary Jennings Jr. and John Ursua to add depth to the position and possibly replace longtime mainstay Doug Baldwin eventually. They used their top two picks on TCU defensive end L.J. Collier (29th overall) and Utah safety Marquise Blair (47th overall) to fill needs on the defensive side of the ball after the departures of Clark and Earl Thomas, and drafted a pair of linebackers in Cody Barton and Ben Burr-Kirven as insurance for Bobby Wagner and K.J. Wright, the latter of whom will likely not be with Seattle in the long-term future.

The Seahawks have made both predictable and surprising moves in this year's draft, and we will see how they pan out after the 2019 NFL season commences in September.

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This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.
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