The smartphone took away the human need for in-person contact without addressing a desire for intimacy, creating a kicking, screaming baby: the dating app. While some experiences can be worthwhile, dating apps such as Tinder and Bumble have caused distress in the college dating community.

Many students find it challenging to stay interested enough to meet the person they've been chatting with in person. Conversations are harder to keep alive, intentions aren't clear enough and it's easier to be judgmental toward someone when you're speaking to them for the first time online.

Speaking from experience, when you finally do find someone worth meeting in person from Tinder or Bumble, the first date can often times be different — and worse — than expected. Most of the time, this is because the image created in your head of your newest match usually doesn't add up to how they are in real life.

According to Psychology Today, the variety of potential partners offered through dating apps can make it even more difficult when it comes to searching for a relationship. With so many virtual profiles to consider, many single people find that online dating isn't as helpful as originally thought.

A quarter of 25- to 40-four-year-olds use online dating apps, but only about five percent of users are able to successfully form a relationship from them. If you have ever been on Tinder, you can already agree to the fact that its focus is more toward instant satisfaction rather than a long-term, healthy relationship.

"Dating today is a nightmare," says Behavioral Psychologist and Author Barry Schwartz told Psychology Today.

For each first meeting, you don't know what to expect — so expect the worst. Many women who are dating tend to send their current location to their close friends, bring along pepper spray and mentally prepare. While not all first dates are awful enough to take action, it's better to be safe than sorry when a date goes south.

There are bad experiences involved with online dating as a college student, but we can't let that keep us from looking for relationships. If you aren't a fan of apps like Tinder, try being more friendly to peers during class, club meetings or parties. You never know if sparks fly unless you try.