Maturity Does Not Have An Age Requirement

Maturity Does Not Have An Age Requirement

Is age the only substantial factor to consider one's level of maturity?
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Maturity is a word used often to define one’s wisdom in regard to decision making, but is maturity really synonymous with the weight of one’s age? Recently, while listening to the radio on my way home from work there was a commentary regarding the age between two people in a relationship. The woman was 65 and her partner was 45. A twenty year age difference was the concern on this woman’s mind about the appropriateness of her relationship. Many callers voiced their opinions. Some were supportive, others disapproving. However, the most repeated response mentioned the level of maturity of both adults within the relationship. Obviously, as the 65 year old, the woman was deemed more mature and many callers remarked that the woman would have more knowledge to teach her much younger partner. Such a statement is fair to acknowledge as we age. The experiences we garner are stored in our brains within the higher level of cognition storage known as memory which provide us with necessary knowledge in order to aid us in avoiding dangerous situations and from making repeated mistakes. Nonetheless, anyone can attest to witnessing immature actions and decisions being made on the part of much older individuals that have us scratching our heads left questioning their level of maturity.

Despite the awareness of maturity among different ages, people still regard maturity, more often than not, solely based on the age of an individual. Why is that? As a young adult, I have always felt that I exhibited a high level of maturity. Still, if I were to be interviewed for a job up against someone who was 29 years old to my 19 years. More than likely, the job would go to the 29 year old. Sure, a hypothetical scenario and the type of job are worthy of scrutiny, but the fact still remains that our society tends to gauge a person's maturity by their age. This is a fundamental aspect of society, considering age attributes wisdom over time, but when does this wisdom begin to manifest if people often make ridiculous choices while the elderly population, just as much as youths, have plenty to learn and adapt to.

As for the twenty year difference, the matter of these two people’s relationship should be regarded between just those two people. Every relationship is not equal, hence if the age difference works for them then that’s what counts. Obviously, the woman may have more lifetime experience than her partner, still his maturity should not be deduced solely because of his age. The quote, “Maturity begins when drama ends” is a prime representation of the way in which maturity should be acknowledged. As people begin to recognize what matters most in life rather than igniting the flames of unnecessary, insignificant, trivial matters than maturity begins to stretch its wings. With that in mind, age is not the unifying factor of maturity, so let’s not make it the requirement to distinguish an individual’s maturity.
Cover Image Credit: fiveminutevacations.com

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5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
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Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

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The Selflessness Of Self-Care

It is OK to nurture yourself before nurturing others.

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Do you find yourself prioritizing taking care of others before taking care of yourself? I do.

Let me introduce myself. My name is Saiarchana, and I am a nurturer. Nurturing people is something that has almost become second-nature to me because I am so accustomed to doing it. I love uplifting others and being there to give them support when they are in need. I love giving support to others so much that I am even majoring in Psychology. Nurturing is something that is incredibly important to me. I nurture others because I don't want anyone to feel alone or unsupported.

But, sometimes I forget to nurture myself.

I used to believe that taking care of others involved sacrifice. This kind of sacrifice was my own energy and self-care. I lived under the belief that by pulling away and taking care of myself, I would be labeled as selfish. So, I kept on nurturing others around me.

Until I broke down.

I was giving so much support and care to others, that I had forgotten about me. I am also a very important person in my life. My relationship with myself is incredibly important, and I had forgotten that. I was so focused on pouring love and care to others, that I had forgotten to water myself with those same sustaining forces. I was getting drained and worn out from nurturing and giving love to so many people around me because I was neglecting myself.

When I realized what was happening, I finally understood: Love is not starvation. I do not need to starve myself in order to feed others. I do not need to neglect my self-care in order to care for and give love to the people around me. Nurturing others does not equate to neglecting myself. Because, once I neglect myself, I end up not being able to show up fully for the people in my life.

I read a quote by an influencer named Allie Michelle. Michelle said:

"Taking care of yourself is selfless. An empty well cannot give water to a village."

When I read this, it was as if my eyes developed clearer vision. I recognized that I believed that self-care was selfish when actually it is one of the most selfless things I can ever do for this world. When I am able to take care of myself, I am at a healthier and stable position to give care to others. When I give from a place of lack, I end up lacking more. Giving my energy to others when I am in desperate need of recharging my own energy will end up making me feel emptier. It is like the good analogy from Michelle's quote. I cannot give from an empty source. When I forget to give love and care to myself, I reach a point where there is nothing left to give to others, because I haven't maintained a solid foundation for myself.

Giving care to others should be a fulfilling experience, not a draining one. In order for it to be a fulfilling experience, I need to make sure I am not giving from a place of emptiness. I need to nurture myself because doing so will give me a stable foundation. So, I finally understand the key to nurturing others: making sure I am nurturing myself first.

So, what now?

I am going to continue giving love and care to others. But this time, I am going to make sure I am nurturing myself too.

I hope you nurture yourself too. You are worthy of the love and care you give to others.

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