10 Things My Grandad Has Taught Me

10 Things My Grandad Has Taught Me

Oh Captain, my Captain.
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When I think of people that have had a profound effect on the way I live my life, one person in particular comes to mind: my Grandad. My Grandad--'the Captain', as my family affectionately calls him--graduated third in his class from West Catholic High School and enrolled in the NROTC program at Villanova as means of tuition payment. He served in the navy as a gunnery officer during the Korean War, raised a family of six children, and still today, as a stubborn and independent 88 year old, does his own taxes manually.

When I was a child, truth be told, I was a bit scared of my Grandad. He has always been very strict (especially with his only son, my Dad) and absolutely refuses to smile for pictures, telling us "We weren't allowed to smile in the navy." To a little kid, that sort of personality was hard to understand. As I have grown older, I have come to realize that my Grandad embodies many of the character traits that I strive to attain. Here is a condensed list of some of the most valuable advice he has given me:

1. Hard work pays off.

There are no shortcuts on the path to success; if you really want to achieve something, it’s up to you to put in the time and effort. The greatest payoff comes from the hardest won battles.

2. Do what you love and success will follow.

If you are truly passionate about something, you can find a way to make a career out of it. There is absolutely no point in pursuing something in order to make money if it makes you miserable.

3. Stick to your principles.

In a world as superficial and complicated as our own, it is easy to get caught up in the hazy gray areas of moral justification. Don't let this happen! It takes work, but moral principles are worth hanging on to; you'll have more respect for yourself because of it.

4.You are smarter than you think you are.

Don't ever let anyone make you think otherwise.

5. Speak up.

Your opinions matter. Just be sure you can articulate them and back them up with facts. Trust me, don’t even try to debate with this man unless you come prepared.

6. Read. Every. Day.

Even if it's just the newspaper--work those brain muscles! Knowledge is power, my friends.

7. Be independent.

Self-reliance is an underrated skill--from basic life skills to trusting your own abilities, learn how to fend for yourself and you'll be truly thankful you did.

8.Take care of yourself.

This seems obvious, but you're gonna be stuck in the skin you're in forever. Eat right, exercise, and learn to love yourself.

9. Say what you mean, mean what you say.

Life would be a whole lot simpler if people were more honest. Don't be a people pleaser--you don't have to change your opinions or beliefs to make someone else like you better.

10. And above all: Family is everything.

Make time for your family. Whether this your flesh and blood, your closest friends, or both, don't let these relationships suffer. Winning a stupid argument or disagreement is not worth losing the most important people in your life. Forgive and forget, offer your support, and most importantly, love them.


Take it from the Captain himself.



Cover Image Credit: Emma Killian

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One Of The Most Impressive Things A Human Being Can Do Is Finish An Entire Tube Of ChapStick

It is the only thing more impressive than the creation of ChapStick itself.

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Mankind's most impressive accomplishments include inventing the wheel, walking on the moon, and, of course, the creation of ChapStick. The air outside is beginning to get dry, and thus, chapped lips are coming, and once chapped lips season begins, millions of poor souls will begin to suffer from the tragedy that is chapped lips. Luckily, we have ChapStick, and Burt's Bees, Carmex, Blistex, and plenty of other lip balm brands as well.

There is nothing worse than feeling your lips begin to dry up, signaling that chapped lips are in your not too distant future. Actually, there are probably many things in life that are worse than this, but it's still pretty bad.

ChapStick is a savior for the chapped, a larger than life hero conveniently available in a small tube at most local stores. Thank goodness for ChapStick (and other brands of lip balm, I guess.) I truly believe that the invention of ChapStick is one of the most important, groundbreaking, and impressive feats that mankind has accomplished.

However, the only thing more important, groundbreaking, and impressive than the creation of ChapStick, is someone finishing an entire tube of it.

I'm not sure if it's even possible to do this, and I'm starting to think that it might not be. Before it can be done, the vast majority of people will either lose the tube, or no longer need it because their lips are no longer chapped. Then, by the time their lips become chapped once more, the tube will then be lost, never to be seen again.

It is a vicious cycle, one that prevents us all from ever finishing our ChapSticks, and probably also helps lip balm companies sell more products.

If anyone has actually used up an entire tube of it from beginning to end, I wonder what life is like for them now. Did they stumble upon some sort of hidden code allowing them to understand the true nature of life and the universe? Did they open a gateway to another dimension with different laws that govern time and space? I think there is a very good chance that one of these events occurs when one finishes an entire ChapStick tube.

It has to signal some sort of mind-bending event releasing the most well-kept secrets of the universe. Nothing else really makes any sense.

If you have finished an entire ChapStick tube, you have my deepest and utmost respect. You have shown the ultimate form of perseverance, prevailing despite the odds of the universe being completely against you. You have shown that you know how to follow through with something, no matter what. You can now live the rest of your life knowing that you have accomplished what most never will.

Be proud of yourself, and make sure to tell everyone you possibly can that you have finished an entire tube of ChapStick. Make sure it's the first thing you say when you meet someone new, tell random people in the street who you have never even met, and put it at the top of your resume when you apply for a job, because they will be sure to hire you on the spot once they learn of your wonderfully impressive feat.

As of now, my lips are beginning to feel chapped, and I have just applied ChapStick to them as a means of combating this dreadful ailment. As I stare at the tube in my hand, my determination to use the entire thing has greatly amplified, and I am more determined than ever to finish the thing and unlock the secrets of the universe. But, who am I kidding? I'll probably lose it before the tube is even halfway gone.

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Celebrating My Mom: Her Beauty and Strength

Here's to the most inspirational woman in my life.

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In observance of International Women's Day on March 8th, it is of paramount importance that we take a few moments to consciously recognize the women in our lives. We often call the women we adore by casual names like "Mom", "my sister", or "my girlfriend", and, usually, these nouns are intimate enough to replace their names---but not today. Today is for appreciating you, Melanie Daugherty, my mom---not as my mother, but as a human whom I hold with the highest regards.

It is easy for me to recall the innumerable times you've embraced me (even though I considered myself to be a disappointment), forced me to put my qualms into perspective, or insisted I put my aspirations into action (because "can't is too lazy to try") ; but, the magnitude of your accomplishments shouldn't always be measured by its impact on me, however, if it were to be, let it be the times you've inspired me.

Mom, I have always appreciated you, but I truly began to define you as my idol during my sophomore year of high school. During this time, I began experiencing shame in my identity. I was an athletic girl, but suffered from body dysmorphia, as well as a misunderstood and pessimistic perception of my inner thoughts. I became very introspective and was completely fixated on thoughts of worthlessness and lack of purpose. I assumed chronic fatigue was just a characteristic of being a teenager. In me, you recognized a past version of who you once were. I cried to you and you embraced me in your arms. My deteriorating state of mental health was not your burden, and you refused to let me define myself by diagnoses and prescriptions. Recognizing your success and triumph over anorexia and depression motivated me. I was so proud to be your daughter. Knowing that confidence and appreciation for the world was possible to achieve accelerated me into a period of self-reflection and determination. I wanted to trace your template of self-improvement with my footsteps and create a new image of myself---one that would reignite my childhood "spark".

You're not just my hero for saving me, but for giving me someone to admire. You live your life without limitations. Competing in the 140.6 mile Ironman triathlon is an accomplishment in itself, competing in the Ironman World Championships in Kona, Hawaii is even more incredible, and completing eight of these triathlons is enough for most people to call you "crazy" rather than by your name. Your greatest demonstration of strength however, was not through athletic prowess, but through mental and emotional perseverance.

Losing your best friend to breast cancer was almost inconceivable because no one ever wants to acknowledge it as a possibility. What people also try to forget, is that it is just as possible for their lives to be taken from them. After learning to cope with your best friend's death, you were diagnosed with stage three breast cancer. Watching you grow progressively weaker was enervating in itself. This wasn't a reality I was able to accept as truth, partially because you were my mom, but also because your strength was an aspect of you that I didn't think could ever be taken from you---and I was right.

Although your complexion grew pallid and your body could no longer sustain itself, your mindset remained the same. You would not accept a last breath, and you ensured that every breath you took reiterated that. You demonstrated to me that positivity is the panacea that combats a discouraged mind.

Mom, for you, I am proud. I am grateful to have lost sometimes, because without loss, I wouldn't have been able to realize my strength, and I wouldn't have realized that if you hadn't been my anchor.

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