Leave Skinny Shaming In 2016

Leave Skinny Shaming In 2016

"All Women Are Real Women."
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2016 was a lot of things, but it's wildly known as one of the biggest shit shows my generation has ever seen. While many things got better, there's one thing that still remains. Body shaming, and not for bigger girls, bur for us skinny girls who have a huge stigma against us.

I think you all know what I'm talking about. "Real women have curves," is just one of the many slogans that make skinny girls feel like they're not good enough. How would a bigger girl feel if I said "real women have a thigh gap." Not very good, and the backlash would be insane.

Millennials are the generation that gets offended by everything, and maybe I'm being a hypocrite for being upset about this, but the fact of the matter is, if we're going to stop body shaming against one body type, why not stop it on all fronts?

I'm not less of a woman because I'm not curvy, frankly, I'm more of a woman because I don't degrade someone for what they can't help. Bigger girls blame genetics for how they look, so why can't we do the same? I eat like a pig, lay on my ass all day, and don't gain a pound. Trust me, if I could give myself curves, I would.

All women are real women. Instead of making 2017 what 2016 was (and by that, I mean making skinny girls feel like lesser women), let's make everyone feel like they're accepted for who they are. I'm 108 pounds, I didn't break 100 pounds until I went to college, and I love my body.

Skinny girls aren't bitches, we don't starve ourselves to keep our figure, and we definitely aren't less than you. So stop doing to us what you think we do to you. While we may be on the runway more, you guys have made us feel like we aren't seen as beautiful as we once were, and that's unfair.

I'm sorry if it's coming off as me complaining, I am just done seeing these real women campaigns that exclude petite and thin girls.


All women are real women.

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I'm The Girl Without A 'Friend Group'

And here's why I'm OK with it

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Little things remind me all the time.

For example, I'll be sitting in the lounge with the people on my floor, just talking about how everyone's days went. Someone will turn to someone else and ask something along the lines of, "When are we going to so-and-so's place tonight?" Sometimes it'll even be, "Are you ready to go to so-and-so's place now? Okay, we'll see you later, Taylor!"

It's little things like that, little things that remind me I don't have a "friend group." And it's been like that forever. I don't have the same people to keep me company 24 hours of the day, the same people to do absolutely everything with, and the same people to cling to like glue. I don't have a whole cast of characters to entertain me and care for me and support me. Sometimes, especially when it feels obvious to me, not having a "friend group" makes me feel like a waste of space. If I don't have more friends than I can count, what's the point in trying to make friends at all?

I can tell you that there is a point. As a matter of fact, just because I don't have a close-knit clique doesn't mean I don't have any friends. The friends I have come from all different walks of life, some are from my town back home and some are from across the country. I've known some of my friends for years, and others I've only known for a few months. It doesn't really matter where they come from, though. What matters is that the friends I have all entertain me, care for me, and support me. Just because I'm not in that "friend group" with all of them together doesn't mean that we can't be friends to each other.

Still, I hate avoiding sticking myself in a box, and I'm not afraid to seek out friendships. I've noticed that a lot of the people I see who consider themselves to be in a "friend group" don't really venture outside the pack very often. I've never had a pack to venture outside of, so I don't mind reaching out to new people whenever.

I'm not going to lie, when I hear people talking about all the fun they're going to have with their "friend group" over the weekend, part of me wishes I could be included in something like that. I do sometimes want to have the personality type that allows me to mesh perfectly into a clique. I couldn't tell you what it is about me, but there is some part of me that just happens to function better one-on-one with people.

I hated it all my life up until very recently, and that's because I've finally learned that not having a "friend group" is never going to be the same as not having friends.

SEE ALSO: To The Girls Who Float Between Friend Groups

Cover Image Credit: wordpress.com

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In Real Life, 'Plus Size' Means A Size 16 And Up, Not Just Women Who Are Size 8's With Big Breasts

The media needs to understand this, and give recognition to actual plus-size women.

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Recently, a British reality dating TV show called "Love Island" introduced that a plus-sized model would be in the season five lineup of contestants. This decision was made after the show was called out for not having enough diversity in its contestants. However, the internet was quick to point out that this "plus-size model" is not an accurate representation of the plus-size community.


@abidickson01 on twitter.com


Anna Vakili, plus-size model and "Love Island "Season 5 Contestant Yahoo UK News

It is so frustrating that the media picks and chooses women that are the "ideal" version of plus sized. In the fashion world, plus-size starts at size 8. EIGHT. In real life, plus-size women are women who are size 16 and up. Plunkett Research, a marketing research company, estimated in 2018 that 68% of women in America wear a size 16 to 18. This is a vast difference to what we are being told by the media. Just because a woman is curvy and has big breasts, does NOT mean that they are plus size. Marketing teams for television shows, magazines, and other forms of media need to realize that the industry's idea of plus size is not proportionate to reality.

I am all for inclusion, but I also recognize that in order for inclusion to actually happen, it needs to be accurate.

"Love Island" is not the only culprit of being unrealistic in woman's sizes, and I don't fully blame them for this choice. I think this is a perfect example of the unrealistic expectations that our society puts on women. When the media tells the world that expectations are vastly different from reality, it causes women to internalize that message and compare themselves to these unrealistic standards.

By bringing the truth to the public, it allows women to know that they should not compare themselves and feel bad about themselves. Everyone is beautiful. Picking and choosing the "ideal" woman or the "ideal" plus-size woman is completely deceitful. We as a society need to do better.

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