" Hi I am Rebecca Lane and I am a Guatemalan hip hop artist."


This was Rebecca Lane's introduction, on October 7, 2015, when she visited CSUN students. Lane considers herself a daughter of war because she was born during the civil war in Guatemala in 1984. Lane grew up in a country where violence, grief and corruption become natural to the Guatemalan community. The injustices, and genocides which occurred in Guatemala eventually led to Lane to develop a sense of anger. Lane participated in rebellious experiences and put her life at risk. For her own safety, Rebecca distanced herself from danger, and took a poetic route.

Now Rebecca Lane uses poetry as an instrument of change. She transforms her writing into hip-hop, which she feels it is the best way to communicate to society about the injustices towards women, and her home of Guatemala. Rebecca talks about feminism in her song Bandera Negra ("black flag"). She reminds her Guatemalan people and the world to remember the massacre through her song Cumbia de la Memoria ("cumbia of the memory"). These two songs are a demonstration of Rebecca's own artistic revolution.

With CSUN students' hands up in the air, there were cheers and heads and bodies moving to the rhythm.

Rebecca Lane

Her urban and charismatic character inspired CSUN students. After her show, students were lining up to take a picture and telling her how cool she sounded. With a humble smile, she took the time to speak to each student who wanted to meet her.

I was fortunate to see Lane during her visit to CSUN, and as an audience member, I am truly grateful a woman like Lane is making a change through music. Lane serves as a reminder that when we feel passionate about anything we must take a stand, especially when it comes to injustices of our society. She demonstrates how we should have the courage and confront the unfairness of this world. Lane comes from a third world country and is a daughter of the war; she is an inspiration because she has risen from the bottom and now is fighting for her people who continue to be marginalized. Most importantly, Rebecca exhibits how art is a form of revolution without being armed. Now for those who want to make a change towards anything that is injustice, what will be your unarmed revolution?