The Greatest Sports Film Speeches That You Absolutely Need In Your Everyday Life

The Greatest Sports Film Speeches That You Absolutely Need In Your Everyday Life

Whether it's on the field, court or ice— it's where champions are born and where legends are crowned.

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    In the face of doubt, it's those places that bring forward both inspiration and motivation to a group of individuals, even spectators. In the scheme of things, that's exactly why sports films so elite in comparison to other genres out there. These sports films would be nothing without overcoming some sort of adversity, and that very same adversity is met with nothing short of courage, heroism, and fortitude.

    Some speeches might be emotional and some might be humorous. Some might be angry and some aren't even said inside a locker room. Some are based on a true story and some are not, yet they all have one thing in common. Each film's speech has the ability to break down that wall and pull the viewer into the situation, letting us truly feel that surreal intensity. It's the perfect trifecta of superb directing, acting, and writing.

    It doesn't matter who you are or where you're from, here are 20 of the greatest sports film speeches that you absolutely need in your everyday life to stay motivated:

1. "Miracle" (2004)

"This is your time. Their time is done. It's over. I'm sick and tired of hearing about what a great hockey team the Soviets have. Screw 'em."

2. "Rocky Balboa" (2006)

"The world ain't all sunshine and rainbows. It's a very mean and nasty place and I don't care how tough you are it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it."

3. "Any Given Sunday" (1999)

"We are in hell right now, gentlemen. Believe me and we can stay here and get the shit kicked out of us or
we can fight our way back into the light. We can climb out of hell. One inch, at a time."

4. "Hoosiers" (1986)

"Forget about the crowds, the size of the school, their fancy uniforms, and remember what got you here."

5. "Pride of a Yankee" (1942)

"Today, I consider myself, the luckiest man on the face of the earth."

6. "Remember the Titans" (2000)

"This is where they fought the battle of Gettysburg. Fifty thousand men died right here on this field, fightin' the same fight that we're still fightin' amongst ourselves today."

7. "D2: The Mighty Ducks" (1994)

"We're not goons. We're not bullies. No matter what people say or do we have to be ourselves."

8. "Friday Night Lights" (2004)

"It's not about winning. It's about you and your relationship to yourself, your family, and your friends. Being perfect is about being able to look your friends in the eye and know that you didn't let them down."

9. "The Sandlot" (1993)

"Everybody gets one chance to do something great. Most people never take the chance."

10. "Coach Carter" (2005)

"l came to coach basketball players, and you became students. l came to teach boys, and you became men."

11. "Facing The Giants" (2006)

"Keep going. Keep driving it. Keep your knees off the ground. That's it. Your very best. Don't quit on me."

12. "We Are Marshall" (2006)

"Six players, six teammates, six sons of Marshall. This is our past, gentlemen. This is where we have been, this is how we got here, this is who we are. Today."

13. "Field of Dreams" (1989)

"People will come, Ray. For reasons they cannot even fathom."

14. "The Blindside" (2009)

"But honor, that's the real reason for you either do something or you don't. It's who you are and maybe who you want to be. If you die trying for something important, then you have both honor and courage, and that's pretty good."

15. "Gridiron Gang" (2006)

Now is the time to prove to yourself and everyone out there that even though you're locked, you're somebody."

16. "Little Giants" (1994)

"When we were kids. We used to race our bikes down Cherry Hill every day after school. We raced every day and he always beat me, but one time— one time, I beat him."

17. "Rudy" (1993)

"Prove what? You are so full of crap. You are five feet nothing, 100 and noting. You hardly got a speck of athletic ability and you hung in with the best college football team in all the land for two years."

18. "Glory Road" (2006)

"Right now it's not about talent, it's about heart. It's about who will go out there and play the hardest."

19. "Invictus" (2009)

"Do you hear? Listen to your country. Seven minutes."

20. "Brian's Song" (1971)

"I think we should dedicate ourselves to give maximum effort to win this game."

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The Coach That Killed My Passion

An open letter to the coach that made me hate a sport I once loved.
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I fell in love with the game in second grade. I lived for every practice and every game. I lived for the countless hours in the gym or my driveway perfecting every shot, every pass and every move I could think of. Every night after dinner, I would go shoot and would not allow myself to go inside until I hit a hundred shots. I had a desire to play, to get better and to be the best basketball player I could possibly be.

I had many coaches between church leagues, rec leagues, personal coaches, basketball camps, middle school and high school. Most of the coaches I had the opportunity to play for had a passion for the game like I did. They inspired me to never stop working. They would tell me I had a natural ability. I took pride in knowing that I worked hard and I took pride in the compliments that I got from my coaches and other parents. I always looked forward to the drills and, believe it or not, I even looked forward to the running. These coaches had a desire to teach, and I had a desire to learn through every good and bad thing that happened during many seasons. Thank you to the coaches that coached and supported me through the years.

SEE ALSO: My Regrets From My Time As A College Softball Player

Along with the good coaches, are a few bad coaches. These are the coaches that focused on favorites instead of the good of the entire team. I had coaches that no matter how hard I worked, it would never be good enough for them. I had coaches that would take insults too far on the court and in the classroom.

I had coaches that killed my passion and love for the game of basketball.

When a passion dies, it is quite possibly the most heartbreaking thing ever. A desire you once had to play every second of the day is gone; it turns into dreading every practice and game. It turns into leaving every game with earphones in so other parents don't talk to you about it. It meant dreading school the next day due to everyone talking about the previous game. My passion was destroyed when a coach looked at me in the eyes and said, "You could go to any other school and start varsity, but you just can't play for me."

SEE ALSO: Should College Athletes Be Limited To One Sport?

Looking back now at the amount of tears shed after practices and games, I just want to say to this coach: Making me feel bad about myself doesn't make me want to play and work hard for you, whether in the classroom or on the court. Telling me that, "Hard work always pays off" and not keeping that word doesn't make me want to work hard either. I spent every minute of the day focusing on making sure you didn't see the pain that I felt, and all of my energy was put towards that fake smile when I said I was OK with how you treated me. There are not words for the feeling I got when parents of teammates asked why I didn't play more or why I got pulled after one mistake; I simply didn't have an answer. The way you made me feel about myself and my ability to play ball made me hate myself; not only did you make me doubt my ability to play, you turned my teammates against me to where they didn't trust my abilities. I would not wish the pain you caused me on my greatest enemy. I pray that one day, eventually, when all of your players quit coming back that you realize that it isn't all about winning records. It’s about the players. You can have winning records without a good coach if you have a good team, but you won’t have a team if you can't treat players with the respect they deserve.

SEE ALSO: To The Little Girl Picking Up A Basketball For The First Time


Cover Image Credit: Equality Charter School

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The Warehouse Scene Analysis: Ben Affleck's Batman

Affleck may be gone but his art will live on.

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If you are a fan of comic books then you probably know by now that Ben Affleck is no longer playing the character of Bruce Wayne/Batman in the next solo Batman movie. Further solidifying that Ben Affleck is done playing the Caped Crusader. And while last week has been full mixed reactions ranging from disappointment to excitement, it looks like Warner Bros. is being particularly careful in selecting the next Batman. But we shouldn't forget everything that Batman has done for the role.

Being originally cast in August of 2013 many were skeptical that the actor could pull off the dark and grizzled persona of the "Dark Knight." But Affleck proved them wrong with his portrayal of Batman in "Batman V. Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016)" is one of the few things praised about the film by critics. And while Affleck will forever be known now as the Andrew Garfield of Batmen, we should take a second and look back and appreciate one of my favorite scenes of "Batfleck's" tenure as Batman.

If you have not seen BVS ("Batman V. Superman: Dawn of Justice") due to critic backlash, I highly recommend that you watch it. Specifically, the Ultimate Edition and not the theatrical version. For the theatrical version was heavily cut down and leaves many plot points unresolved. The film, while not perfect, is still a decent action film to watch and enjoy. Specifically, the "warehouse scene". In this scene, Batman has to save a certain character (No spoilers) from a bunch of mercenaries. And while Fight scenes in Batman films in the past have been decent, this takes the cake.

Warehouse Scene / Batman Saves Martha | Batman v Superman Dawn of Justice (2016) Movie Clip youtu.be

I appreciate that the filmmakers took a realistic approach to Batman fighting a bunch of heavily armed individuals. Movies often make fights look simple. Either by cutting to a different shot each time to give the audience the impression of a "fight" or a character simply punching an individual one time, incapacitating them. In reality just because someone is hit, they don't often stay down. And so we see in this scene how Batman doesn't simply punch a mook and they collapse. Instead, the mook gets back up ready to take another swing at the Dark Knight.

The Dark Knight Rises - "Light it up" Batman saves Gordon and Blake (HD) IMAX youtu.be

Above is a clip from "The Dark Knight Rises" (2012) where Batman saves Officer Blake's life. The scene is a memorable one because as an audience member we are excited to see the return of Batman after he was incapacitated for so long. However, we suspend our disbelief as Batman clearly takes these guys down with ease. If you actually pay attention you will notice a man or two falling down without having any contact with Batman. Again we suspend our disbelief for this scene and I don't mind it at all. But compared to Affleck's brutality and realism it is pretty epic.

Another highlight I'd like to point out with the "Warehouse scene" is that it reminds me a lot of the "Batman: Arkham" video games. The series had players obviously playing as the Caped Crusader and what was always praised was the free flow combat. It wasn't just button mashing or specific combos that become boring after the first two hours of the game. It's about timing and reading your opponents, as seen in the video below.


BATMAN ARKHAM KNIGHT Baseball Bat Finish youtu.be

Getting back to the "warehouse scene" from BVS, I appreciate that Batman uses Krav-Maga in his fighting technique. Krav-Maga is an Israelian self-defense fighting where the main objective is to defend yourself and incapacitate your opponents. I used to train in Krav-Maga during my junior and senior years of High School and I can tell you it really comes in handy. Simple techniques can take down your opponent in an instant. And in this scene Batman defiantly uses it. For example, at the 2:20 mark he uses an advanced version of an arm block to stop his knife attacker. And at the 3:00 mark when another attack tries to grab Affleck's lower half Batman takes the back of his head and slams him to the ground. Like mentioned earlier, Krav Maga is about defense so redirecting the attacker was the smart move in this instance. Throwing him off balance, resulting in Batman to obviously attack him.

It's obviously difficult to appreciate Ben Affleck's warehouse scene from BVS if you don't appreciate martial arts. Or understand how this brutal Batman is a real-world Batman. But I feel like, for comic readers, Ben Affleck's Batman was one of the most comic books accurate Batman since Adam West. And it wasn't just his fight scenes. It was his mannerism and his build. While not perfect, he was still pretty great and will be missed.

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