11 Best #GIRLBOSS Quotes For Your Instagram Caption

11 Best #GIRLBOSS Quotes For Your Instagram Caption

All you need is WiFi and a dream.
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If you’re anything like me, you think about Instagram captions more than the average human being.

It’s not because I’m afraid of sounding stupid, it’s because I want to project the best possible version of myself. I want someone to be scrolling through their feed, stop on my picture, read the caption and think, “Wow, that really inspired me to live my day with purpose and intention.” I want every girl to believe that she can be a #GIRLBOSS because without belief, we have nothing.

As silly as it sounds, I’m here to tell you that belief starts with your Instagram captions.

1. "Be that girl who wakes up with purpose and intent."

You know who she is. BE HER.

Perfect for: any pictures of yourself that you absolutely adore

2. "Raise your standards and the Universe will meet you there."

You are not the type of girl who settles. Keep not settling.

Perfect for: when you're raising your champagne glasses with your BFF's

3. "All you need is WiFi and a dream."

...and maybe an iced vanilla latte.

Perfect for: any photos that involve your laptop

4. "Empowered women empower women."

'Nuff said.

Perfect for: best friend pics

5. "Be grateful for what you have while you pursue what you want."

People think they need a DSLR camera to start a YouTube channel but all you really need is your iPhone. Just start with what you've got and the rest will follow.

Perfect for: simplistic shots in hipster coffee shops

6. "My goal is to create a life I don't need a vacation from."

You've gotta do what you love, right?

Perfect for: aesthetically pleasing desk photos

7. "If you always do what you’ve always done, you will always get what you’ve always got."

This one will have your followers reading it twice just to make sure they understand the meaning behind it.

Perfect for: pretty much any photo

8. "You've got to trust the process."

Trusting the process is one of the hardest things, but you've got to do it.

Perfect for: any progress pics

9. "If you are serious about changing your life, you will find a way. If not, you will find an excuse."

Quit making excuses!!

Perfect for: that time you accomplished something really amazing and everyone was jealous of you

10. "I'm too creative to have a 9 to 5."

The cubicle life isn't for me.

Perfect for: anytime you are expressing your true self

11. "Go after dreams, not people."

Don't ever go after people!!

Perfect for: ideas that are scribbled in cute notebooks with motivational phrases

Cover Image Credit: Instagram

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8 Things You Need To Know About Selling On Redbubble

Everyone buys their stickers from Redbubble, but have you ever wanted to be the one making them?
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As someone who loves to fool around in Photoshop and Illustrator, I saw Redbubble as a chance to flex my skills as a graphic designer. The massive popularity of them provided me with an opportunity to make a little money on the side doing something I not only enjoyed but could do when the mood struck me. It seemed like a win-win, but there were a few things I wish I knew before I started making stickers.

1. Don't expect to be rolling in dough.

It took a month and maybe 10 different designs before I sold any of my stickers. I joined in October of 2017, and I have sold about 20 stickers.

2. Redbubble stickers are expensive for a reason.

At this point, I have sold about 20 stickers which may seem like a lot, until you find out how much I make per sticker. The artist sets how much they make after Redbubble’s share, so artists can set it as low as 0% profit (which means the sticker sells for $2.29).

3. Buying 10 and getting 50% off is great when you're the one buying the stickers...

...but it sucks when you’re the one selling them. I make an average of 20% per sticker, so when you buy my $2.75 sticker for $1.38, I only make 23¢.

4. Make things you would buy.

If there’s something you want to buy, but it doesn’t exist, make it. Keep in mind as well that if you wouldn't buy it, odds are that not too many other people would.

5. Try to offer variations.

You might make a design in blue and love it, but consider offering it in different colors. Someone might love the design but hate the color.

6. Make your designs as versatile as possible.

Redbubble is primarily known for its stickers, but your designs can be put on anything from a poster to a wall clock. Take advantage of that because more expensive items mean you make more for the same design when they sell.

7. Keywords are KEY.

You want your designs to be as visible as possible, so take advantage of all the tools they give you. Try to tag your design with anything that might relate to it; you want it to pop up in as many tags as possible.

8. Do your research.

If you are interested in making something, search one of the keywords and see how many results there are for it. Sometimes there is a need, and you can fill it.

I have enjoyed my time on Redbubble nonetheless, and I recommend it to anyone who likes to design or draw. It’s certainly not a good way to get rich quick, but I enjoy it. Every time someone purchases one of my stickers, I feel this rush of pride in knowing someone liked something that I designed. That's a big reason why I continue to put designs on Redbubble.



Cover Image Credit: Meagan McDowell

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Selling Yourself

Building relationships with the people around yourself is the key to sales.

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Hi, my name is Isaiah Gardner. Every day, I sell myself to other people.

I approach strangers on the streets and in establishments - bars, clubs, restaurants, malls, shopping centers, insurance agencies, anywhere you can think of - in the hopes of building a new relationship with them.

At this point, you're likely thinking that I'm in a line of work that is entirely separate from the one I'm thinking about, but in all honesty, both use the key component of sales. As a salesman, the top priority is to build rapport and a relationship between yourself and the person with whom you are interacting.

Being in sales is probably one of the most difficult, yet also the most enjoyable, occupations I've held. People inherently hate salesmen - when I stroll into an establishment with my suit and a sly grin, leather-bound notepad in hand, I immediately receive cold looks and narrowed eyes. Dressed head to toe in black, it's no wonder that my presence is ominous, but I don that outfit in the name of professionalism and utmost seriousness. Simply put, I mean business when I enter a room.

I'm one of two people to the receiver of the aforementioned sly grin: An agent of some party that they really don't want to have to interact with, either because I'm there on official business that they'd like to extract themselves from, meaning that they need to turn tail and get out of there as soon as possible. Or, a salesman, here to pitch them a product or service that they don't necessarily need, but which I'm going to pitch to them anyways in the hope that I can advertise myself and the commodity that I bear as one of necessity and utmost quality.

While my demeanor and outfit may be off-putting, my alarming presence is the first thing that I aim to dispel. Not only am I there to sell my product; I'm there to sell myself as a personable, charming, amicable partner with whom a business owner should wish to do business. The foundation of all relationship-building, regardless of the situation, is based upon building rapport and earning the trust of the person or people before you.

Think back to your days in preschool. You were guided there by your parents to an establishment filled with complete strangers, all of which struggled with advanced linguistic mechanics, had just learned the fundamentals of coloring within the lines, and had an attention span of maybe five minutes, provided they weren't staring intently into the relatively fuzzy image produced by a VHS tape displayed on a boxed screen before them.

And yet, somehow, you made friends with these strangers. How'd you do it? I'll bet it was through finding common interests, perhaps through miniature race cars, small constructive blocks, dolls of the plastic or cloth variety, or similar hobbies. Even today as an adult, essentially nothing has changed. In order to sell yourself to others, whether it's to make a sale, make new friends, connect with your new love interest, or to reach any sort of audience, you have to appeal to them in some way - identify what they like, see if you can match that up with something you like, and boom, there's your connection.

People can be very complex, but they can also be very simple. Everybody likes something, and if you come bearing something that they like - in my case, that's money, savings, and the newest promotions - it's rather easy to reach through to them. Connecting with others is a simple process in the sense that you only have to find common ground; the complexity arises as you work around their suspicions and resistance to something new. I'm not preaching anything groundbreaking, but if you stay tuned, I'll give you the tips and tricks needed to connect with literally anybody - yes, anybody, from your friends to business executives - and sell your personality and trust to them.

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