My take on big sporting events such as the World Cup.

realizations that came to light during the 2018 FIFA World Cup

Things that have come to mind during the world-famous sports event.

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Disclaimer: I am in no way a soccer expert nor do I play soccer; I am simply someone who enjoys watching sports and believes it is necessary to defend people who are like me.

I have found that during any sports event, not just the World Cup, many people get defensive about the sport like they are the only ones that are allowed to play, watch or talk about it. To these people I would like to say, get off your high horse. Any person is allowed to enjoy the beauty of the sport whether they know much about it or not. Sports serve to join people together, so that no matter the differences, you can sit side by side cheering on your favorite team. In events like the World Cup, it's about supporting your favorite team, that being your country's or any other. Why would you feel so superior as to shame someone who doesn't necessarily follow the sport for wanting to share that love for a team? Just relax and enjoy the game and let others do the same.

Now, that being said, if you are that person that knows little to nothing about the sport and are watching with knowledgeable people, good luck! I understand that you may have questions and are trying to better understand the sport, but no one, I repeat, no one will enjoy answering 50 questions whilst watching a game they are invested in. Save your questions for things you truly do not understand and cannot go on without knowing for the sake of your relationship with this person.

Good luck to your favorite teams and I hope that you enjoy the remainder of the World Cup and the other sports events to come!
Cover Image Credit:

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The Top 20 Hottest NHL Players

Hockey players are so much more than toothless, scarred beasts.
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As a lifelong fan of the NHL, I've grown up watching the tough and rugged players on the ice. I have learned to appreciate their ice presence when they're playing and now I can appreciate how well they clean up off ice. I believe hockey players are some of the most underrated athletes in America. They're more than just scarred up, toothless beasts. These ice gods heat up the ice with not only their talent, but with their looks as well.

Since the hockey season is in full swing, I felt it was an appropriate time to recognize their attractiveness along with their talent. So without further ado, here are the hottest male professional hockey players in the league as of today.

20. Patrick Kane, Chicago Blackhawks

This studly player is impressive at every angle. He is second in the league only to Alex Ovechkin for most goals scored this season. That, along with sex appeal such as his, makes him a major cause of racing hearts and swooning.

19. Andrew Ference, Edmonton Oilers

Captain of the Oilers and environmental extraordinaire, he has skills on the ice that pertain to more than just good stats and records. His care for the environment, smoking hot looks, and performance on ice are three reasons why he is featured here.

18. Carey Price, Montreal Canadiens

While being one of the best goalies in the league, Carey Price is one foxy man. He has hockey in his blood: his father played for the Philadelphia Flyers. That explains his incredible talent which led him and his Canadian team to win the 2014 Sochi Olympics.

He does, however, have a wife. I can only hope I become as lucky as her and all of the other NHL wives.

17. Chris Higgins, Vancouver Canucks

Chris Higgins? More like Prince Charming. His swoon-worthy charm and sweet persona draw attention to him. That, and his incredible abilities as a hockey player. He is one of the most respectful players in the league, making him a man no one can hate.

16. Erik Karlsson, Ottawa Senators

This hunk has everything going for him: a second-to-none defenseman rating, long and luscious hair, and those muscles. He's just 25 years old and has been playing for seven seasons. I wouldn't mind being able to meet him and see if those muscles really are bigger than my head.

15. Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins

This man has made himself a household name along with being extraordinarily good looking. As the captain of the Penguins, he is incredibly skilled on and off the ice. It's approximated that he earns $8.7 million per year. If he's getting paid that much for less than perfect puck handling, it must mean he's good.

14. Kris Letang, Pittsburgh Penguins

This beauty is a defenseman with one Stanley Cup win under his belt. He's even won gold medals at back-to-back at the World Junior Championships. He has all that plus looks; what a catch. However, he's got a son that means the world to him, along with a very lucky wife.

13. Beau Bennett, Pittsburgh Penguins

Beau is 6'2" of pure handsome. His boyish charm and potential star athlete are hard features to overlook. He is working his way up to making a name for himself, as he is just 24 years old. Ladies, get a hold of him while you still can.

12. Brent Seabrook, Chicago Blackhawks

This proud papa is a ten year veteran defenseman. His looks aren't the only thing he excels in. Without him, Chicago's defense would be missing a key part of their team.

11. Jeff Carter, LA Kings

While he is a two time Stanley Cup winner, Carter is a beautiful man as well. He's a ten year veteran. Surprising, right?

This romantic proposed to his girlfriend just days after winning his second Stanley Cup. So, sorry ladies, he's happily married.

10. Henrik Zetterberg, Detroit Red Wings

His veteran status at age 35 seems like a fictional statement. He does not look 35 whatsoever. My theory is that he's a vampire. Or maybe he just ages well.

In his career, he has scored 308 goals as a left winger for the Red Wings. He's got the looks and the talent, as do most of the men on this list.

9. Ryan McDonagh, New York Rangers

As captain of the Rangers, McDonagh is a renowned defenseman. His grace on the ice makes him a key player in the Rangers' lineup. Injuries have plagued him this season, but his skills have yet to falter.

8. TJ Oshie, Washington Capitals

For those of you who love men with long hair, TJ Oshie is your guy. He's got the flow not only with his luscious locks, but with his hockey skills as well. He's a veteran winger that is as good on the ice as he is in looks.

7. Alex Wennberg, Columbus Blue Jackets

This Swed has only been in the league for 2 years, so he's a pretty new face to the NHL community. So, look out for him in the next few years, ladies. This 21-year-old is a promising athlete and exceptionally gifted in the looks department.

6. Mike Green, Detroit Red Wings

This Canadian defenseman is a key player on the ice for the Red Wings. He is a well-suited veteran, playing in the league for 10 years. Despite his veteran status, his looks have been constant through the years.

His muscular build is necessary during games and greatly appreciated when the pads come off. I'm sure those muscles are bigger than my head.

5. Ryan Kesler, Anaheim Ducks

This veteran has been in the league for 13 seasons, but has not lost his charm. He has been with the Canucks for 11 of those seasons; he was traded to the Ducks only two years ago. His talent goes past his hockey skills as he released his own clothing line, "RK17."

He is married and a father of three beautiful children. Sorry ladies, but there are more men to choose from on this list that are just as attractive.

4. Derick Brassard, New York Rangers

Tall, dark, and handsome. Standing at 6'1", this center has made a name for himself throughout his eight years in the league. Originally drafted by the Columbus Blue Jackets, he was later traded to the Rangers, where he has been a star. As a Rangers' fan, I am not complaining whatsoever. He has netted 122 goals throughout his career and his on-ice presence is essential to the Rangers' playmaking abilities.

He is, unfortunately, taken by former figure skater Terra Findlay. She's a lucky lady to be with such a talented, good looking man.

3. Tyler Seguin, Dallas Stars

I would do anything to see him riding the zamboni as he's pictured above at intermission. This 24-year-old Canadian was drafted in the first round, second overall. He's netted 32 goals this season already, which is tied for third in the NHL behind Alex Ovechkin and Patrick Kane.

Along with his impressive on-ice skills, he is unbelievably attractive. Look how toned his legs are! To my knowledge, he is single as a Pringle. I just wish he would mingle somewhere near me.

2. Marcus Foligno, Buffalo Sabres

This 24-year-old has been in the league for four years and I only just discovered him during my quest for attractive hockey players. He's not a very well-known player, but he's incredibly talented and single. Go get him ladies!

1. Henrik Lundqvist, New York Rangers

Number 30 on the ice and number 1 in my heart. I may be a bit biased, being a Rangers fan and all, but there is no doubt that Henrik is the most attractive player in the league thus far. He's also one of the best goaltenders to ever grace the ice. Recently -- February 25, 2016, to be exact -- he passed Mike Richter for most saves in the Rangers' franchise history in their win against the Blues.

Sorry ladies, this Swed is married happily and has a young son. Therese Andersson is one lucky lady.

Now, I can only hope that I am lucky enough to marry an NHL star. It's my goal in life to score one of these extraordinarily attractive men. (Bad pun? Sorry.) A girl can dream, can't she?

Cover Image Credit: askmen.com

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Just Because You Can Throw A Ball Does Not Mean Your Rape Is Admissible

Why are university athletes more likely to commit sexual assault?

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I wish rape didn't seep into every sphere of my life. But, like ink, it has.

Interpersonally, my childhood friend was gang-raped by members of the University of North Texas basketball team. As uncovered in an investigation, her circumstances were not isolated, unlike what it says in UNT's initial statement. I am proud to know my friend. I am proud to stand with her. However, I am ashamed at the situation and the commonness of her suffering among students just like me, on college campuses.

Politically, Betsy DeVos, Secretary of Education, promotes new fortifications for students accused of sexual assault. Basically, the rules would reduce the legal classification of harassment while offering protections for those accused of wrongdoing. In my emotions, I firmly believe in the American ideal of being "innocent until proven guilty". However, even in a crime so entrenched in emotions, I must look at facts. Facts say that the falsification rate of rape is the same as most other crimes, somewhere around 5%. Therefore, I believe that DeVos' proposal would tilt investigations in favor of the committer and significantly lessen the number of victims who would have the assurance to come forward and tell his/her story. In a campus-setting, where 1 in 5 women and 1 in 16 men are sexually assaulted, her "solution" adds gasoline to a country-wide fire.

Educationally, Brock Turner, a swimmer at Stanford University received just six months in county jail after being found guilty of five felonies, all of which amount to him raping an unconscious woman behind a dumpster. In defense of the light sentence, the judge said, "the more time (Turner spends) in jail, the more severe impact" on his future, who wanted to go to the Olympics. Never mind the future of the victim.

First off, rape culture, a sociological concept in which sexual assault is pervasive and normalized, exists. And while it exists everywhere, I can only speak with any authority on the campus setting, where hook-up culture is both catalyzed and camouflaged. Here, the area that needs the most treatment is in the locker room, on the court, or on the field.

Student athletes are proportionally the greatest perpetrators of sexual misconduct.

While a tiny 3% of male students are athletes, male student athletes are responsible for almost a fifth of sexual assaults on campus. And that is just the events that are reported, (just so you know, about 3 out of 4 go unreported). However, the NCAA has no policy that lessens a student's athletic eligibility in the face of sexually violent behavioral patterns. If you have allowed these numbers to simmer in your mind, you can see that this is unacceptable.

Why are university athletes more likely to commit sexual assault?

Most experts make cultural and institutional arguments.

Culturally, student athletes are not seen as "normal" students – rather, they provide a service to the college. Where most students get something from the college, student athletes give to the college, and we should be so lucky to have them grace us with their presence. It is a part of the status quo: high-status students on campus are athletes, especially males who play the most popular sports, like football, basketball, or baseball. These students carry social privilege.

Obviously, athletes are not naturally ethically worse than other students. I am simply saying that absolutely no one is immune to the culture that surrounds him/her, and we have a weird culture.

On average, athletes are more likely than other students on campus to buy into the cross-cultural concept of robust masculinity, which, in extreme cases, can lead to increased sexual aggression. Don't just take it from a non-athlete like me. Even Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, an NBA champion and a former UCLA basketball player, declared the cultural privilege from which he benefited.

"I'm especially aware of the culture of entitlement that athletes feel... they strut around campus with the belief that they can do no wrong."

I am not going to sugarcoat the point that we all know well: football players are comparable to celebrities on campus, which has dangerous implications for a certain untouchability in mindsets.

Institutionally, colleges are as inclined to protect the perpetrator over non-athletic peers. A Senate report concluded that administrators tend to do three actions to protect their athletes, and therefore, their brand.

1. Higher-ups at the school discourage victims from reporting to police outside of the university. In this method, they let the campus police "handle it" and not report to less-biased city forces.

2. Admins downplay an assault's severity, making it less 'criminal', more unintentional and of an event to "move on from".

3. The athletic department can work with the administration and strategically delay proceedings while athletes finish their season.

If these three things are not enough as far as systemic ethical transgressions go, when athletes are found responsible for sexual assault, they may face small consequences.

Just to pull an infamous example from my home state of Texas, Baylor University continues to wrestle with how to deal with battery; I don't need to go over the sheer amount of claims that they were conscious and compliant to most allegations of assault involving their student-athletes.

So, not only is our mindset messed up, but the administration who is supposed to protect us is similarly bungled.

Obviously, athletes are not bad people, only people that are subject to their environment and protected by their talent. But crime is crime. The unnamed victim of Brock Turner said it well as she argued that being "an athlete at a university should not be an entitlement to leniency, but an opportunity to send a message that sexual assault is against the law" no matter your status.

Throwing a ball does not make someone above the rules.

Yes, I realize that my words have become trite. Scary articles, documentaries, and books about the sheer magnitude of sexual crime in college abound. But I see my seemingly-repetitive diction more as a reflection of our fallen collegiate system, rather than of myself.

With my article, I only ask that you keep fighting for victims like my childhood friend, for the classmate who sits next to you in lecture, for yourself. This institutional and social discrepancy of "athletics above all else" happens at more universities than I had the breath to mention.

Your first step is taking a searing examination at the failure of American universities to grapple successfully with campus rape in the systematic pattern of protecting student athletes more than other students. The next steps follow naturally. Take part in the activism at your school, encourage survivors, and productively confront the problem. Fear not, the policies will change with your effort.

Politics aside, we are in a time for you to continue speaking the truth, even if your voice trembles.

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