The Fort To Battery Race Takes Over Charleston

The Fort To Battery Race Takes Over Charleston

Fast is the new future.
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The final horn goes off, and hundreds of flying objects seem to lift off the water in a sprint for Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor. No, it’s not science fiction; it’s Tim Fitzgerald’s vision come to life. Four years ago, Tim moved to Charleston, SC from Kansas, left his snow shovel behind in search of a stronger connection to the sport of sailing. Fitzgerald has an impressive resume under his belt, he has made a name for himself sailing keelboats, as well as in the Thistle, Lightning, Laser and Sunfish classes, to name a few. Tim stood on the end of a dock looking out towards the Cooper River bridge and made a bet with a few friends that he couldn't make it to the bridge in 15 minutes. With this handshake, the concept for the Fort to Battery are was born.

As the current owner of a Hobie 20, and an avid kiteboarder and foilboarder, Tim believed that an adrenaline-fueled drag race in catamarans and other “flying” water-craft could bring the crowd. The Fort to Battery married the excitement of competitive sailing to the large tourism trade in Charleston. Each year competitors from all over the country pack their cars full of kites, boards, and gear and load their boats on trailers and set out for Charleston, with one mission in mind: to go fast.

While four miles in only five minutes, 52 seconds may seem like something only achievable by airplane... Foilboarder Zack Marks proved otherwise in 2016, setting the course record. Boats with top speeds under 20 mph need not apply, the race is a sight to behold, competitors, ages ranging from youth to 70+, scream downwind, dodging in and out of catamarans and avoiding each other, hundreds of spectators line the battery and parks shoreline of James Island, while helicopters hover overhead in attempt to capture the whole thing. It’s unlike anything the sailing world has seen, chaos and action. 2009 Rolex Yachtsman of the Year, Bora Gulari, took the gold at the first race, saying ”I love events like this that are a bit different from our regular racing and have an element of chance and huge amount of fun to them.”

Fitzgerald hopes that the Fort to Battery will inspire more people, especially kids, to pick up the sport of sailing, and realize that the potential for racing goes far beyond a few laps around the race course. Fort to Battery 2017 will take place on April 29th, at approximately two p.m.. The race can be watched from Sunrise Park on James Island and seen from The Battery in downtownCharleston. The race will be live streamed at sailinganarchy.com.

Cover Image Credit: Fort to Battery

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7 Lies From F*ckboys That We've All Fallen For At Least Once

They might've had you goin' for a hot second, but you know better now.
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There’s no use in even frontin’; we’ve all been there. You know he’s a f*ckboy from the beginning, but you’re interested in pursuing him anyway. Ain't no thang; I fully support you.

You tell yourself you won’t fall for his games or lies because you’ve been through it all so many times before. Yet, time and time again, you find yourself slippin’ for a hot second, wanting to give him the benefit of the doubt until he inevitably disappoints you. Here are the top seven lies you’ve heard from f*ckboys that get you heated every time.

1. You’re the only girl I’m talking to/sleeping with


HAHAHA. OK, first, I don't actually care what (or who) you're doing in your spare time because you're definitely not the only guy I'm seeing either. I'm just asking so I know you're clean, OK? I don't need more stress in my life.

2. I know how to treat girls right

Isn't it super ironic how the WORST f*ckboys are the ones to toss this line?

3. I’ll text you

This statement is so unbelievable that on the off chance that they do actually text you, you basically fall out of your chair in shock.

4. I’m gonna give it to you good

I cry/cringe/die of laughter every time I hear this one because it's always the mediocre ones that throw this line. None of my most memorable hookups have ever said this because their actions clearly speak for them. Mediocre boys, TAKE NOTE.

5. Damn, I wanted to see you though

Well, you were supposed to, but then you clearly had other plans in mind. So the desire wasn’t all that intense, obviously.

6. Yeah, she and I broke up

CLASSIC LIE. CLASSIC. Sure, I believed it the first couple of times, but don’t even try that sh*t with me after I see she’s still blowin’ up your line.

7. *No response for hours after making plans* Damn, sorry I fell asleep


Honestly, how many times are you gonna throw that line when you’re literally viewable on Snap Map. BOY, I see you at someone else’s house. Stop frontin’, there’s no point.


Again, don't ask me why we put up with this sh*t because the mystery remains. I guess in our own sick, twisted ways, we crave the dramatics and thrills that come from their f*ckery. Whatever the reason, though, at least we've got some ~fun~ stories to tell.

Cover Image Credit: YouTube | I'm Shmacked

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From Practices To Performances, Dance Teams Take Over Stony Brook University

I found a community of people who finally shared my interests that I hid for years. It's great to finally have a crew who all cares about the same thing.

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While many students at Stony Brook University like to go home or to the library on late nights, dance teams take over academic buildings around campus to practice for performances.

Practicing in places like Earth and Space Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences and Center for Leadership and Service, groups like KBS, CDT and PUSO Modern practice two or three times a week to prepare for events like Seawolves Showcase and Asian Night and for competitions like the Prelude Dance Competition.

The KBS Dance Team, a group that focuses on dancing to K-Pop and K-Hip-Hop, has performed at events on campus like CASB Cultural Carnival and Asian Night. The team even has a subgroup of some members of the team who have extra practices and experiment with different styles of music and dance.

Nicole Lombino, a KBS manager said, "I found a community of people who finally shared my interests that I hid for years. It's great to finally have a crew who all cares about the same thing."

This semester, KBS had practices twice a week and practiced for about two hours at each practice. The director and the two managers lead practice which includes presenting choreography, learning new dances, creating dance formations and cleaning members' movements to look as neat as possible before performances.

"KBS isn't a competitive team so you're not pressured to compete with anyone or beat someone else at something," Tina Ng, the current director of KBS and a member of CDT said, "You're just doing it for fun."

Many members on the team are freshmen and have never danced before being on KBS.

"Even in this one semester, I've seen them grow as dancers," Lombino said, "From the first to second performance, it's staggering how much they've improved."

Dancing on a team at Stony Brook University is more than just a club, it's a commitment. And members on the executive board of dance teams have to organize performances, make sure practices run smoothly, and serve as mentors for their teammates.

"I'm responsible for this team and my eboard and I have to share the weight and any difficulties," Iris Au, a KBS manager said. "I have to actively participate and contribute to the team, which is different from when I was just a team member."

The breakdancing club on campus, the Stony Brook Breakers, have open practices and have members that help people learn breakdancing, regardless of skill. They practice in the Health Sciences Tower and the university's Recreation Center.

Breakdancing moves like windmills, headspins and baby spins are moves that the Breakers have had to work hard to learn and are still difficult for members.

While many dance teams hold auditions to be in the group, a couple of teams hold dance workshops where anyone can attend to learn short pieces, usually between 30 seconds and one minute.

Adam Sotero, a member of the dance team Deja Vu, helped organize a workshop featuring guest teachers from PUSO Modern, Cadence Step Team and Heartbreak Crew.

"The purpose of the workshop was to engage more in the dance community and showcase everyone's different styles," Sotero said. "My favorite part about these events is engaging with other members of the dance community, whether they are old or new friends."

Apart from members of Deja Vu, over 50 people attended the workshop that was held in SAC Ballroom A. The attendees learned two hip-hop pieces and one step dancing piece.

CDT also held three workshop days two weeks ago, featuring teachers from CDT, KBS, and Outburst Dance Company. The workshops focused on K-Pop, hip-hop and urban dance.

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