7 Thoughts I Have When Sitting In My College English Class
Start writing a post

With my first full year towards my English degree behind me, I have had some time to reflect on my education thus far. With each new class, I was given the opportunities to meet new people, learn new things, and think in different ways. In certain classes, particularly my English ones, I was surrounded by interests and goals similar to my own.

Well, for the most part.

As I sat down in classes of students with majors similar to my own, I felt this need to prove my intelligence and potential within the world of language and literature. I wanted everyone to like me and talk to me about everything from research projects to the hottest summer reads.

Maybe you have experienced this in your own classes. Maybe I sound crazy. Either way, here are a few of the thoughts that often ran through my mind as I made my journey through my first few college English courses.

1. "How am I the only one who looks like they haven't just stepped out of an indie coffee shop?"

Giphy

The first time I sat down in my English class this past semester, my first thought was "Oh my goodness! Everyone looks like they just stepped out of an H&M ad!" As I sported my cozy cable-knit sweater and sensible riding boots, others were rocking over-sized crop tops, denim-on-denim, vintage t-shirts, and a variety of other clothing items I am too much of a coward to wear.

2. "I can't admit I haven't read that book."

Giphy

The shame! I cannot tell you how many times I have pretended to be busy answering a text during a pre-class debate over the complexity of a current best-selling novel. Even worse is when I Google the plot when no one is looking and jump into the conversation as if I had read it. Is it wrong to do? Probably. Will I do it again? Absolutely.

3. "This poem was terrible! How does everyone else like it?"

Giphy

Any English major knows what I am talking about when it comes to falsely-praised poetry. Don't get me wrong. You should like what you like! That being said, nothing you ever say will make me like Rupi Kaur's cliche and blunt style. It's nothing personal; I just like my poetry with a side of obscure symbolism and unnecessarily difficult language.

4. "Is this an appropriate time to brag about reading 'Wuthering Heights' three times?"

Have I mentioned this before? I'm not kidding. I've read this book three times. Do you know how much time I have poured into reading, analyzing, and discussing this story? Yes, I am going to bring it up in every class discussion for the rest of my life! Oh, you're reading this book for fun? Let me overwhelm you with every bit of information I have acquired on this work. This book is my ticket to looking like I know what I am doing. I am going to use it.

5. "Is this book smart enough to talk about?"

Giphy

One of the most stressful questions ever asked in an English class: "What is your favorite book?" This is the most popular ice-breaker for a literature class, sending a class full of strangers into a frenzy of whether to admit their favorite book being the second "Twilight" or pretend to absolutely adore "Jane Eyre." Unfortunately, I am at the beginning of the alphabet, and my favorite book is "Emma" by Jane Austen, so many of my classmates adore "Jane Eyre."

6. "Wait. So they ALL want to write a book?"

Giphy

When sharing future aspirations, most English majors tend to list off their ideal career and then tack on "and then maybe I'll write a book." Personally, I have accepted I do not have the motivation, time, or patience to type out two hundred pages of fiction gold. I originally found this embarrassing, scared it would make me appear unambitious, but I have made peace with it. I sincerely hope each of my classmates does write a successful novel. I cannot wait to read and share them with my future high school English students!

Report this Content
This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.
Olivia White

"The American flag does not fly because the wind moves it. It flies from the last breath of each solider who died protecting it."

Keep Reading... Show less
Featured

Separation Anxiety in Pets

Separation anxiety in pets is a real thing and recognizing the warning signs is important.

424022

Since March, Covid-19 required most of the world to quarantine in their homes. Majority of people ended up working from home for nearly five months. This meant pet owners were constantly with their pets giving them attention, playing with them, letting them out etc. Therefore, when the world slowly started to open up again and pet owners began returning to normal life work schedules away from the home, pet owners noticed a difference in the way their pet acted. Many pets develop separation anxiety especially during this crazy time when majority people were stuck inside barely leaving the house.

Keep Reading... Show less
Featured

The invention of photography

The history of photography is the recount of inventions, scientific discoveries and technical improvements that allowed human beings to capture an image on a photosensitive surface for the first time, using light and certain chemical elements that react with it.

445500

The history of photography is the recount of inventions, scientific discoveries and technical improvements that allowed human beings to capture an image on a photosensitive surface for the first time, using light and certain chemical elements that react with it.

Keep Reading... Show less
Health and Wellness

Exposing Kids To Nature Is The Best Way To Get Their Creative Juices Flowing

Constantly introducing young children to the magical works of nature will further increase the willingness to engage in playful activities as well as broaden their interactions with their peers

1784118

Whenever you are feeling low and anxious, just simply GO OUTSIDE and embrace nature! According to a new research study published in Frontiers in Psychology, being connected to nature and physically touching animals and flowers enable children to be happier and altruistic in nature. Not only does nature exert a bountiful force on adults, but it also serves as a therapeutic antidote to children, especially during their developmental years.

Keep Reading... Show less
Facebook Comments