What Drew Brees Becoming The All-Time Pass Leader Really Means

What Drew Brees Becoming The All-Time Pass Leader Really Means

There is nobody else who deserves this accolade more.

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For anyone who watched the Saints and Redskins game, they got to witness a moment in history. On a 62-yard touchdown pass, Drew Brees became the all-time leading passer in the NFL. For someone who many considered too short to play in the NFL or called him done after a shoulder injury, Brees has come a long way and has victimized opposing team defenses. He is also on his way to joining the 500 touchdown club that is home to Peyton Manning, Brett Favre, and Tom Brady. Throughout the game, current and former players were tweeting their support for Brees and how happy they are for him. As someone who grew up two hours from New Orleans, I can admit how happy I am for Drew Brees but he was not just having a record-setting night he was showing the city of New Orleans how much they mean to him.

The NFL is weird. People who are considered experts try to determine who will be successful in the NFL and who won't. Tom Brady was told he didn't have a strong arm and lacked a tight spiral. Drew Brees was told he seems more comfortable in the short/intermediate passing attack and wasn't tall enough. Whoever these experts are must not do a good job looking over these guys. Drew Brees journey to being the all-time passer is an interesting one. He grew up in Texas where he leads his high school to a state championship, was 28-0-1 as a starter and was the honorable mention for the USA Today All USA High school football team. However, despite his accolades, only two colleges were interested in him and ultimately Brees went to Purdue.

After excelling for four years at Purdue, Brees was drafted in the second round of the 2001 NFL draft by the San Diego Chargers. After some up and down seasons with the team Drew Brees showed his dominance and was invited to his first Pro Bowl in 2004. This seems like a great start to the career for Brees, however, despite his success the Chargers went out and drafted Eli Manning with the first pick in the NFL draft in the 2004 NFL Draft (later traded for Philip Rivers) this event seemed to spark Drew Brees and now it looked like San Diego had their quarterback.

In the 2005 season, things would look bleak when in a game against the Denver Broncos Brees fumbled and jumped for the ball. After jumping on the ball one of the Denver players Brees in the shoulder causing a labrum injury. He needed surgery and at the end of the season, Brees decided to find a new team.

So what does this have to do with New Orleans? Well in 2005 New Orleans had experienced one of the worst hurricanes in the United States known as Hurricane Katrina. The city of New Orleans was broken, the Superdome was a mess and there was talk of the team moving to San Antonio, TX. The Saints were not a successful team and needed help. Enter Sean Payton. Payton was a well known assistant coach and if there was anyone who could revive New Orleans it was Payton. He needed a quarterback though and he was willing to take a risk on Drew Brees, the quarterback claimed might not play again.

So I have told you the story of how Brees got to New Orleans but you're probably wondering why people view him as the hero of NOLA or why so many people love him. Being told you're too short and that there is a chance you may not play again motivated Brees to become one of the best but remember when Brees became a free agent there weren't many people who were interested in him. When Brees came down to New Orleans to visit the city was still pretty damaged and he realized the city and the team needed a hero and that is why Brees came to New Orleans.

As much as I want to say that Tom Brady is the best quarterback of all time being able to see your hometown team rally behind someone like Drew Brees still brings me happiness.

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The Coach That Killed My Passion

An open letter to the coach that made me hate a sport I once loved.
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I fell in love with the game in second grade. I lived for every practice and every game. I lived for the countless hours in the gym or my driveway perfecting every shot, every pass and every move I could think of. Every night after dinner, I would go shoot and would not allow myself to go inside until I hit a hundred shots. I had a desire to play, to get better and to be the best basketball player I could possibly be.

I had many coaches between church leagues, rec leagues, personal coaches, basketball camps, middle school and high school. Most of the coaches I had the opportunity to play for had a passion for the game like I did. They inspired me to never stop working. They would tell me I had a natural ability. I took pride in knowing that I worked hard and I took pride in the compliments that I got from my coaches and other parents. I always looked forward to the drills and, believe it or not, I even looked forward to the running. These coaches had a desire to teach, and I had a desire to learn through every good and bad thing that happened during many seasons. Thank you to the coaches that coached and supported me through the years.

SEE ALSO: My Regrets From My Time As A College Softball Player

Along with the good coaches, are a few bad coaches. These are the coaches that focused on favorites instead of the good of the entire team. I had coaches that no matter how hard I worked, it would never be good enough for them. I had coaches that would take insults too far on the court and in the classroom.

I had coaches that killed my passion and love for the game of basketball.

When a passion dies, it is quite possibly the most heartbreaking thing ever. A desire you once had to play every second of the day is gone; it turns into dreading every practice and game. It turns into leaving every game with earphones in so other parents don't talk to you about it. It meant dreading school the next day due to everyone talking about the previous game. My passion was destroyed when a coach looked at me in the eyes and said, "You could go to any other school and start varsity, but you just can't play for me."

SEE ALSO: Should College Athletes Be Limited To One Sport?

Looking back now at the amount of tears shed after practices and games, I just want to say to this coach: Making me feel bad about myself doesn't make me want to play and work hard for you, whether in the classroom or on the court. Telling me that, "Hard work always pays off" and not keeping that word doesn't make me want to work hard either. I spent every minute of the day focusing on making sure you didn't see the pain that I felt, and all of my energy was put towards that fake smile when I said I was OK with how you treated me. There are not words for the feeling I got when parents of teammates asked why I didn't play more or why I got pulled after one mistake; I simply didn't have an answer. The way you made me feel about myself and my ability to play ball made me hate myself; not only did you make me doubt my ability to play, you turned my teammates against me to where they didn't trust my abilities. I would not wish the pain you caused me on my greatest enemy. I pray that one day, eventually, when all of your players quit coming back that you realize that it isn't all about winning records. It’s about the players. You can have winning records without a good coach if you have a good team, but you won’t have a team if you can't treat players with the respect they deserve.

SEE ALSO: To The Little Girl Picking Up A Basketball For The First Time


Cover Image Credit: Equality Charter School

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Dear Oklahoma, Please Take Care Of Jalen Hurts

He's one of the good ones, we promise.

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Dear Oklahoma fans, coaches, and players, please take care of Jalen Hurts.

When Hurts graduated in December of 2018, everyone in the Alabama fanbase knew that a transfer was coming soon. After showing his distinct character and loyalty to the Alabama Crimson Tide by choosing to play the 2018 season, even though he would be second in line to Tua Tagavailoa, Hurts deserves this chance to make the best decision for himself. The selection process regarding where Hurts would end up this upcoming season was kept relatively private, which of course open the doors to countless predictions from fans and analysts.

However, I can confidently say that I was not the only one shocked at his choice, but I whole-heartedly support it.

Home to two Heisman-winning quarterbacks, Oklahoma is a more than a smart choice on Hurts' behalf. Within that program, he will be given ample opportunity to improve his craft in order to put himself in the best position for a successful career post-college. The Sooners obviously have an incredible program that leads players down the best paths to be as successful as possible, and that is all Alabama fans want for our beloved quarterback.

With all this being said, I, as an Alabama fan, just ask the Oklahoma Sooners to take care of Jalen and realize how special of a player he is.

With Hurts at quarterback, you will never have to question his effort or loyalty to his teammates. He will always carry himself with grace, no matter the situation. If you give him an opportunity to succeed, he will put forth all of his effort in order to take advantage of it.

Jalen Hurts is one of the most special players, and young men, to ever wear an Alabama Crimson Tide uniform. All that we ask is that you support him as we have these past three years.

Roll Tide.

Sincerely,

Every Alabama Fan

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