17 Myths About Agriculture In 2017

17 Myths About Agriculture In 2017

You can't trust everything you read online.
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As a young agriculturalist, I tend to hear a lot of things about my industry from those who aren't involved in it. With misinformation spreading like wildfire via the news, social media and word of mouth, there are some pretty off the wall myths and rumors flying around. Here are seventeen common myths I hear about agriculture in 2017.

1. Family farming is dead; factory farming rules.

2. GMO's are evil and harmful.

3. Farmers are only in it for profit.I promise farming isn't big money.

4. Organic is automatically better for you.

5. Free range is best.

6. Organic and sustainability go hand in hand.

7. Farmers are hurting the environment.

8. Farmers don't and can't produce enough food to feed the population.

9. Large scale agriculture, what many call "factory farming", can never be good.

10. Farmers and ranchers don't care about their livestock.

11. Our food supply is poisoned.

12. Monsanto is the bad guy.

13. Agriculture is killing the planet.

14. Organic uses zero pesticides or fertilizers, not even "natural" ones.

15. Farmers are uneducated.

16. Livestock are pumped full of drugs.

17. Globally, hunger is caused by a worldwide shortage of food.


I'm proud to be an agriculturalist, an agricultural communicator, and a third generation family farmer. Every day, I try my best to combat the myths, the rumors and the lies I hear constantly about the generation I love. After all, Grandpa always said there's no one as wise as the farmer.

Cover Image Credit: Blake Fox

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7 Truths About Being A Science Major

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Whether your major is Human Bio, Chemistry, Neuroscience or any other that deals with a lot of numbers, theories, experiments and impossibly memorizing facts, you know the pressures of pursuing a career in this field. So without further ado, here are seven truths about being a science major:

1. There is no “syllabus week.”

Coming back to college in the fall is one of the best times of the year. Welcome week has become most students' favorite on-campus holiday. But then you have syllabus week: another widely celebrated week of no responsibilities… Unless you’re a science major that is. While your other friends get to enjoy this week of getting to know their professors and class expectations, you get to learn about IUPAC nomenclature of alkanes on the first day of organic chem.

2. Your heart breaks every time you have to buy a new textbook.

Somehow every professor seems to have their own “special edition” textbook for class… And somehow it’s always a couple hundred bucks… And somehow, it's ALWAYS required.

3. Hearing "attendance is not mandatory," but knowing attendance is VERY mandatory.

Your professor will tell you that they don’t take attendance. Your professor will put all lecture slides online. Your professor will even record their lectures and make those available as well. Yet if you still don’t go to class, you’ll fail for sure. Coming into lecture after missing just one day feels like everyone has learned an entire new language.

4. You’re never the smartest person in your class anymore.

No matter what subject, what class or what concentration, there will always be someone who is just that much better at it than you.

5. You get totally geeked out when you learn an awesome new fact.

Today in genetics you learned about mosaicism. The fact that somebody can have a disease in part of their total body cells but normal throughout all others gets you so hype. Even though you know that your family, friends and neighbors don’t actually care about your science facts, you HAVE to tell them all anyways.

6. There is never enough time in a day.

You are always stuck choosing between studying, eating, sleeping and having fun. If you're lucky, you'll get three of these done in one day. But if you're a risk taker, you can try to do all of these at once.

7. You question your major (and your sanity) almost daily.

This is especially true when it’s on a Tuesday night and you’ve already consumed a gallon of Starbucks trying to learn everything possible before your . Or maybe this is more prevalent when you have only made it through about half of the BioChem chapter and you have to leave for your three hour lab before your exam this afternoon. Regardless, you constantly wonder if all the stress is actually worth it, but somehow always decide that it is.

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My Class Requirement Turned Into A Lifelong Passion For Non-Profits

"If you asked me a year ago today, I would have never expected to be in the position that I'm in right now."

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Declaring my minor in special education just a few months ago was probably one of the best decisions I've made since becoming a college student two years ago. Every single class that I took furthered my interest even more in this area of education with so many layers that I never even knew existed. As a requirement for my minor, I had to take a class titled "Service Learning" which I didn't think much of, to begin with, but grew to adore overtime. This class challenged me to find a community need in Tucson to attend to and volunteer for the semester.

While researching different non-profit organizations I came across two that caught my eye immediately. The first one was (NAMI), The National Alliance on Mental Illness and the second one was Tu Nidito for children and families dealing with bereavement and serious illness. At The National Alliance on Mental Illness, I ran a hotline to answer phone calls for people in desperate need of advocates or groups to attend. That volunteering experience truly made me realize the importance of a community need and why we all need to be active in whatever community we reside in.

After finishing up my time at NAMI, I became a part of Tu Nidito, an organization that assists families and children with grieving or serious illness. This volunteer experience started out as something temporary which shortly became permanent. Being able to speak to children who are hurting at such a young age could be extremely difficult, but seeing how they express themselves and find comfort in speaking with someone just a little bit older is such a rewarding feeling.

Last summer I took an internship with a company that treated me as if I was part of their tight-knit family which was the best feeling. We were able to excel in assisting non-profit organizations with starting up and getting funding from different types of sponsors in the community. As a marketing and social media intern, I was able to see the growth within our own company as well as the individual non-profits that would come to us for assistance. It was unbelievable to step into their organizations and be a part of something much bigger than myself.

If you asked me a year ago today, I would have never expected to be in the position that I'm in right now. This unbelievable world of growth and dedication never even crossed my mind as a first semester sophomore in college. It wasn't until I realized that every community has a need that it became so much clearer to me this would be a decision that would change my life, and it did. No matter where I end up across the globe, I will always be involved with an organization that serves a community. It's difficult to remember a day that I didn't know about non-profits or how important they are to keep the world around us together.

"You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you."

- John Bunyan

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