10 Facts About Panic! At The Disco

10 Facts About Panic! At The Disco

10 Facts To "Panic!" About

Think you know Brendon Urie and Panic! At The Disco in general? Put your knowledge to the test with these crazy facts!

1. The Early Days

In 2004, Panic! At The Disco was formed in Las Vegas, Nevada by two childhood friends, Spencer Smith and Ryan Ross. They both attended Bishop Gorman High School, and they began playing music together freshman year. They invited friend Brent Wilson from Palo Verde High School to join on bass, and Wilson invited his classmate, Brendon Urie, to try out on guitar. Initially, Panic! At The Disco was just a Blink-182 cover band. Little did they know... They were destined for so much more. Ross and Urie soon began to commit to their laptops the demos they had been developing, and posted them on PureVolume. On a whim, they had the guts to send a link to Fall Out Boy's Pete Wentz. Wentz, who was in Los Angeles at the time with the rest of Fall Out Boy working on From Under The Cork Tree, drove all the way down to Las Vegas so he can meet with the young, unsigned band. Upon hearing "two to three" songs during band practice, Wentz was impressed and immediately wanted the band to sign to his Fueled By Ramen imprint label Decaydance Records, which made the band the first on this new label.

2. Brendon Urie

We all know now that he is a singer and a multi-instrumentalist. Also, he is still best known as the lead vocalist of Panic! At The Disco, of which he is the sole remaining member. Now, what about his background? Well, Urie was born in St. George, Utah. He was raised in a Mormon family, and often had to skip band practice just to go to church. When he was 17, however, he moved out of his house because he told his parents that he didn't believe in God. Urie described himself as a "spaz" in high school, and explained that only one student would always bully him. He also worked at Tropical Smoothie Cafe in order to pay his band's rent for their practice space. At the cafe, Urie would often sing for customers.

3. Their Debut Album

A Fever You Can't Sweat Out is the debut studio album by Panic! At The Disco. Produced by Matt Squire, the album was released on September 27th, 2005, on Decaydance and Fueled By Ramen. Recording the album wasn't easy, according to Ryan Ross. During an interview, he said, "Everyone go on everybody's nerves. Someone would write a new part for a song, and someone else would say that they didn't like it just because you ate their cereal that morning." Upon its release, A Fever You Can't Sweat Out became a commercial success. It helped bolster sales to 1.8 million in the U.S. by 2011, making it the group's best-selling release. In late 2015, its certification was upgraded to RIAA double platinum for 2 million shipments.

4. Their First Hit Single

"I Write Sins Not Tragedies" is a song by the band, and is the second single to be released from A Fever You Can't Sweat Out. The song was released on April 27th, 2006 on both CD and Vinyl, and it was written by all the original members. The song was on the Billboard Hot 100 chart (at #7). This was the band's only top forty hit until 2015. When the song was released, many U.S. radio stations wouldn't play the original version because of its explicit lyrics, but fans (like me) didn't seem to care anyways. The music video for "I Write Sins Not Tragedies" was ranked in Billboard's Best 2000's Video Poll (at #3), and it won Video of the Year at the 2006 MTV Video Music Awards.

Fun Fact: Brendon Urie and Ryan Ross were both suffering with the flu when they made the music video for "I Write Sins Not Tragedies." That shows that this band cares about their material!!!

5. The Start Of Somethings New

In 2008, Panic! At The Disco went through their first of what would soon be many changes. It all started when the band revealed a new logo, dropping the exclamation point from the group's name. However, it received a mostly negative reaction from fans... And I don't know why. Also, on July 6th, 2009, Ryan Ross and Jon Walker announced that the they were leaving the band, citing creative differences with Brendon Urie and Spencer Smith.

6. The Next Chapter

A lot of fans thought that Panic! At The Disco was officially dead when Ryan and Jon left the band. Could they continue to make great music? HELL YEAH!!! In September of 2009, Panic! At The Disco released their first single without Ryan and Jon, "New Perspective." The song was featured as a part of the soundtrack to the film Jennifer's Body. On March 22nd, 2011, Panic! At The Disco released their third studio album Vices & Virtues, featuring the single "The Ballad of Mona Lisa." The album debuted on the Billboard 200 chart (at #7), selling 56,000 copies within its first week. Then, on October 8th, 2013, they released their fourth album Too Weird To Live, Too Rare To Die!, featuring the singles "Miss Jackson" and "This Is Gospel." This album debuted on the Billboard 200 chart (at #2), earning the band their second career number two. On April 2, 2015, Spencer Smith announced that he had officially left the band to continue his fight with substance abuse. So, for the next album, Brendon Urie had to write and record it all by himself, and the end result was the album we know today as Death Of A Bachelor (released on January 15th, 2016), featuring the singles "Hallelujah," "Victorious," "Emperor's New Clothes," and "Death of a Bachelor." The album debuted on the Billboard 200 chart (at #1), with 190,000 album units, earning the band its best sales week and first number one album.

7. Other projects

It turns out that Brendon Urie loves to write music more than everything else and he enjoys collaborating with other artists / bands. In terms of songwriting, he wrote songs with the likes of Weezer and 5 Seconds Of Summer. Most of the time, however, he likes to appear as a guest vocalist as well. Recently, he was featured on a song called "It Remembers" by Every Time I Die. In the past, he was featured in "One of THOSE Nights (feat. Patrick Stump)" by The Cab, "Keep On Keeping On" by Travie McCoy, and three Fall Out Boy songs ("7 Minutes in Heaven," What a Catch, Donnie," and "20 Dollar Nose Bleed").

8. Brendon's Wife

In speaking of writing music, Brendon Urie can be pretty romantic when he writes music. The lyrics to "The End of All Things" from Too Weird To Live, Too Rare Too Die! was written about his wife, Sarah Urie. In fact, the lyrics were Brendon's vows for their wedding, and he wrote the song two days before their wedding day (April 27th, 2013).

9. The World Of Panic! Media

Panic! At The Disco may not have sold tens of millions of albums compared to the likes of bands such as Blink-182 and Green Day, but their music videos have been viewed almost a billion times. In fact, when you add up all of their music videos, lyric videos, tour updates, interviews, guest appearances, etc., it all adds up to almost a billion views, and that's nuts! It's also nuts to just say that Panic! At The Disco's video for "I Write Sins Not Tragedies" has exactly 154,737,583 views on YouTube alone.

10. The Future Of Panic! At The Disco

As most of you already know, Brendon Urie is the only current member remaining in the band. Since Spencer's departure, Panic! At The Disco has mostly just been a one man act, and people think that it could be for the better or for the worse. But, perhaps it can all be summed up by just looking at the album cover of Too Weird To Live, Too Rare To Die!. In an interview about the album overall Brendon said, "I love being the center of attention. I'm shameless about it. And being the lead singer, everyone thought it made sense, for me to be front and center. It felt right, since I was so close to these songs. Too Weird To Live, Too Rare To Die! was really just about the times I had, growing up in Vegas. I wanted to create that character. The person that's on this album cover isn't who I really am, even when I was smoking a cigarette on it. I've quit since then, but when I was a kid that was the guy who ran around Vegas and owned it. He had a jacket, he was smoking a cigarette, he was owning the dessert, he didn't give a f**k, and the smoke was colored. That to me was the quintessential Vegas guy."

Overall, Panic! At The Disco is still an amazing band, Brendon Urie is an amazing, inspirational man and musician, and I can't wait to see what the future holds for him and the band.

Cover Image Credit: Jeff Nelson

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This EDM Entrepreneur Is Taking Over The Indianapolis Music Scene

New weekly EDM night is coming to Blu Lounge in Indianapolis

Bailey Ploughe wears a floral bucket hat and carries a camera around the bar, you might see him in a tie-dye shirt or even behind the stage. A Cameron Crowe attitude, at first glance, you might think this guy is just another EDM fan. But then you'll notice the strobe light in his eyes.

"Music has always been a passion for me, and I've always wanted to be involved in the music scene."

Photographer, videographer, DJ, promoter, producer, event coordinator, and even mattress store manager; Bailey has a lot to add to his resume. He owns Big Picture Photography as well as New Hippies Entertainment. And even with all of this, Bailey still has many goals and dreams left to fill.

"One of my life goals is to become a touring concert photographer with a big name EDM artist. So I started coordinating and promoting shows a couple of years ago so I could start building a portfolio of concert photography."

From booking and promoting shows, Bailey cut his teeth in the music industry. Bailey began hosting shows and parties with his friends, which were local DJs and musicians. This allowed Bailey to practice his show photography skills while also making a name for himself in the music scene and offering exposure to the artists.

"At this point in life it has turned into something bigger than helping me as a photographer, I am now pursing careers in promoting and as a musician."

What does Bailey Ploughe have planned next in the scene? Blursdays.

The weekly Thursday EDM event, Blursdays, will take place at Blu Lounge on Meridian Street in downtwon Indianapolis. New Hippies Entertainment teams up with Butler U EDM club to create this night of underground music. You can expect to hear house, dubstep, trap, and even drum and bass. The first week will have free entry and will include local DJs; Not Alex, Adi Mag, Ejion, BAI, and Luso.

Bailey's love for music drives his career but also gives him a chance to support others and encourage others in the creative industry.

"I want to help the local art community, I've started doing 'Creative of the Week' post on my New Hippies Entertainment Facebook page. I'll do an interview on any type of creative and then post 2-5 different posts about that creative throughout the week."

He is also in the works of planning an event to raise money for local high school art departments.

With entrepreneurs like Bailey Ploughe, the Indianapolis EDM scene continues to grow.

"I personally think that we have amazing talent in Indiana. We also have two amazing promotional companies in Indianapolis that bring big names out! Shout out to Indy Mojo and KID Presents!'

The first Blursday will be Thursday, March 29, at Blu Lounge in Indianapolis. Music starts at 9 p.m.

Cover Image Credit: Big Picture Photography

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23 Questions With 'Not Her Daughter' Debut Author Rea Frey

Interview with author of Power Vegan, The Cheat Sheet and other lifestyle books.

I had the honor of picking Rea Frey's mind about her debut novel, "Not Her Daughter," reading and other opinions. If the name sound familiar it's because she is the same author of "Power Vegan," "The Cheat Sheet" and other lifestyle books. The first couple of questions are personal give insight to Ms. Frey's motivations and background. Then we moved on to questions about the new book and reading in general.

1. What first inspired you to write?

"My father. He taught me to read and had at least 30 notebooks full of handwritten poetry strewn around the house. As soon as I could read, I always had a book in my hand. (I even had my own card catalog system in our pantry, which moonlighted as my library.) I loved getting lost in stories. I remember a poem my dad and I wrote together when I was in the third grade called "Soapsuds." It won a writing competition, and I realized that not only did I love writing, but I loved the way it could make people feel. I kept up with poetry, journal writing, letter writing and later, turned to stories."

2. Have you always wanted to write? If not, what did you want to do?

'I’ve pretty much always had two loves: writing and fitness. I wanted to be an Olympic gymnast when I was little. Then it was an Olympic sprinter. Then an Olympic boxer (before female boxing was an Olympic sport). Then a librarian. Then a veterinarian. Then an astronaut. Then a writer. I parlayed my love of health and wellness into writing as I got older in the form of nonfiction books, journalism and magazine writing, but those two “subjects” always fought for the most space in my life. Writing is the only thing I’ve ever done, however, that has felt completely effortless. (But that’s probably because I’ve had well over three decades of 'practicing' it daily.)"

3. What is your favorite genre?

"It used to be literary fiction, then women’s contemporary fiction, then nonfiction and the last few years, I’ve enjoyed domestic suspense, especially since I’m now in that genre."

4. Favorite childhood book?

"The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein"

5. What are your favorite books or authors now?

"Such a hard question! Some of my faves include: 'To Kill a Mockingbird,' 'The Mouse and the Motorcycle,' 'Dubliners,' 'Wuthering Heights,' 'The Grapes of Wrath,' 'The Color Purple,' 'Middlemarch,' '11/22/63,' 'The Power of Intention,' 'Happiness for Beginners,' 'A Moveable Feast,' 'Underworld,' 'The Secret History,' 'Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,' 'House of Mirth…' the list could go on."

6. What’s something you think readers should know about you or your writing?

"I’m a very fast writer. I’ve never spent five years with one story…I just feel like it would change too much. Every time I go back to a story, I want to edit, so the drafts I put out are actually quite raw (which can be both good and bad)."

7. Preferred working conditions?

"Coffee, Billie Holiday, morning, staring out a window. Repeat."

8. They say writing reveals more about the author. Do you agree? What does your work reveal about you?

"I love that question. When I first started writing fiction in college, there were so many parallels with my own life. Write what you know, right? But for "Not Her Daughter;" I wanted to write what I feel. I took a concept I was familiar with — parenting — and applied it to a situation I was unfamiliar with, like kidnapping a child. While I am nowhere in this novel, I’m also everywhere.

"I recognize myself in Sarah, in Emma, in Amy. While this book is about absent mothers, my mother was always there for me (and still is), so it was interesting to take a deep dive into backgrounds I wasn’t familiar with and imagine the outcomes of not having a dependable mother. What effect does that leave on a child? I think one of my strong suits as a writer is to garner empathy from even the most unlikeable characters. We are all layered and complex. I think that’s what readers will learn the most about me. I’m an open book, and I often notice details that link us all together— and they aren’t always the “prettiest” parts of humanity."

9. What are your goals as a writer?

"You read all the statistics about the sell-through rate of a book, and it’s grim. But then you also look at how improbable it is to get an agent and a book deal, and I believed that I could do it, and I did. I want this book to be a bestseller, sure. But more than that, I want to establish a longstanding career and build up a rich, wonderful readership of people who will enjoy reading my books as much as I enjoy writing them. It’s all about the readers."

10. What did you learn from joining a writer’s group?

"Before I returned to fiction, I was kind of intimidated by writers’ groups. However, after I’d just hammered out my first draft for "Not Her Daughter," I stumbled into a wonderful local writers group. I feel like they’ve been here every step of the way, from landing the agent to the pitching process to revisions to the book deal and countdown to publication. I think you learn so much from objective readers and talented writers."

11. Any advice for amateur authors?

"Read. Read as much as you possibly can. Then read 'Story Genius' by Lisa Cron. You’ll soon realize everything we’ve been taught about writing a story is wrong. Then read what you love to write. Study how other authors do it. See what books are successful, what people buy, what composes a 'good' book to you. Build up your author platform (sounds irrelevant, but it’s not). Finish the d*mn book. Whatever you are writing, finish it FIRST and then have a few trusted readers give you feedback. But not too many.

"When your book is done and you’re ready to query agents, ask other writers for help. (I’m always here to help new writers.) Go to the bookstore, find books in your genre and check out the acknowledgments page. See what agent they thank and jot that name down. Research those agents at home. Look at their author lists. Know how to write a good query letter. (Or again, research or ask for help.) And then send that bad boy into the world and start working on something else."

12. How was it to write a novel in a month?

"It was so much fun! I always say that this book wrote me. It was kind of an out-of-body experience because I wasn’t thinking about next steps or even getting it right. I just wanted to get the story out of my head, and I’m so glad I finally sat down to write it. That single month changed my entire life."

13. Can you list all your previous books and where to find them?

"I’ve had four nonfiction books published by various publishers, ranging from Simon & Schuster to Ulysses Press. They are all available in bookstores or online, wherever books are sold:

'The Cheat Sheet: A Clue-by-Clue Guide to Finding Out if He’s Unfaithful, 'Power Vegan: Plant-Fueled Nutrition for Maximum Health and Fitness,' 'Detox Before You’re Expecting: A Cleansing Program to Prepare Your Body for Pregnancy' and 'Living the Mediterranean Diet: Proven Principles & Modern Recipes for Staying Healthy'

14. What is your new book Not Her Daughter about?

"It’s a domestic suspense about a woman who kidnaps a five-year-old to save her from her mother."

15. Where can readers pre-order?

"Anywhere books are sold: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Indiebound, Books-A-Million, etc."

16. How do you think your book stands out from other novels?

"I think I’m taking a common theme, like kidnapping, and reversing it. Is kidnapping still wrong if you’re doing it for a good reason? I think the domestic suspense genre has risen quickly, and I think NHD strikes a good balance between emotion and suspense. At the end of the day, this book is about relationships and sacrifice, which we can all relate to— but spinning the plot to have it revolve around a kidnapping is a different way to approach something universal, like motherhood."

17. You write nonfiction. What would you say to people who stereotype nonfiction as boring?

"Depends on what you’re reading! I absolutely love nonfiction because it’s actionable. I reach for books that will teach me something. As much as I love getting lost in a novel, the most 'changes' in my life have come after reading a really powerful nonfiction book. Anything by Pam Grout, Lisa Cron’s 'Story Genius,' and Greg McKeown’s 'Essentialism' have utterly shifted the way I approach work, time management and my outlook on life."

18. What gave you the idea for this book?

"I’ve always been obsessed with the subject of motherhood. What makes a good mother? What makes a bad mother? Why are we so connected and loyal to our mothers, even when they disappoint us? While I never planned on becoming a mother, I did, and I have learned such invaluable lessons. I’ve swiftly realized that my daughter knows me better than anyone, because she’s seen the absolute best parts of me and also the ugliest parts. Who else can you say that about in your life? That one human has seen all of you, for better or worse?

"On a business trip, I witnessed this horrible exchange between this adorable little girl and her mother, and I couldn’t get that little girl out of my head for weeks. It gave me the 'reverse kidnapping' idea, because we’ve all seen parents mistreating children in public and thought, 'God, I wish I could rescue that kid right now.' I wanted to take a character who wasn’t a mother (and can’t possibly understand the daily grind of motherhood) and have her kidnap someone else’s child with the hope of saving her…It brought up all of these moral dilemmas, not to mention if she could get away with it in this technologically advanced age."

19. How would you encourage non-readers to read?

"Reading is one of the most important things we can do. Years ago, I volunteered with a literacy council here in Nashville to teach adults to read. Trying to explain our difficult language and all of its rules to someone who had lived over 40 years without reading was difficult. But it made me realize one of the most important gifts we can give ourselves and our children is the gift of literacy. If you don’t like reading, you probably just haven’t found the 'thing' you like to read.

With all of the influx of information through our phones and computers, reading a book not only gives our eyes a break, it allows our minds to focus on one thing. While we are able to multitask, we aren’t able to multi-focus. Reading forces you to focus on what you’re doing. Make reading luxurious. Take a bath, have a glass of wine and find something you really love. One quick tip anyone can try is instead of reaching for your phone in the morning, take five minutes and read something instead. Poetry. The newspaper. Classic literature. It changes the entire tone of your day."

20. What other projects are you working on?

"I’m on my second round of edits for my second book and about 115 pages into the third. For my 'day job,' I’m the editorial director for a branding agency called SimplyBe, and we are launching a book proposal division that I will be leading. I write nonfiction book proposals for top-level clients and try to land them agents or book deals, so it’s fun to take what I’ve learned in this industry and apply it to help others!'

21. When should we expect another book?

"I have a two-book deal with St. Martin’s Press, so the next book will be published August 2019. If all goes well, I hope to be on a book-a-year trajectory."

22. Will this book be a series or a stand alone?

"This is a stand-alone book. However, in the original draft, I wrote it with the intention of having a sequel to find out what happens to Emma. When the book went to auction, one publisher wanted the sequel and for "Not Her Daughter" to be a lead title and a hardback book. The other wanted a stand-alone book, trade paperback (because it’s easier to sell), etc. Though I wanted to write the sequel and have the book be hardback, I went with the other publisher because I really connected with the editor. But who knows? If people really love the book and want to see what happens years down the road to these characters, I would love to reconnect with Sarah, Emma and Amy. I miss them already."

23. Do you have a message you want to tell people in the book community?

"Besides to pre-order my book? (I kid, I kid.) A book’s success depends on its readers. While a writer does the work, none of it matters if people don’t buy and read the book. I’m in a debut author’s group on FB, and one thing seems universal: bad reviews. There’s nothing wrong with a bad review, but I would say this to readers and reviewers everywhere: before you slam a book, think about how that review will affect an author (or you, if you were in their shoes).

"You wouldn’t believe how MUCH a one-star review shifts not only the ratings, but the overall morale of the writer or how it deters others from reading and possibly enjoying that book. Not that all reviews should be glowing, of course. This is simply the book business. I am already steeling myself for those who won’t like the book or think the plot is improbable or are appalled by kidnapping, and that’s OK. No one book is universally loved. But just think before you review.

"If you don’t like a book, maybe offer some constructive feedback to the author, because we are definitely listening! Also, sharing the word about a book you love and being willing to pre-order or share on social channels makes all the difference. Writers can’t have a career without readers’ support. It all starts with a strong book community!"

24. What social media can readers find you on?

"Instagram: @reafrey

Facebook: Rea Frey

Twitter: @ReaFrey_Author.

I hope you got some new books to add to your TBR list and will take advantage of National Reading Month. The release date is Aug. 21, so pre-order her book today!

Cover Image Credit: vibetribe

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