You Might Have Been Raised By Old School Parents If...

You Might Have Been Raised By Old School Parents If...

14 signs you grew up with old-fashioned parents.

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If you know me, there are no two people I love more than my parents. However, when I was younger, I realized that not everyone was raised quite like me. My parents raised me in a manner that could be considered to many as "old-fashioned" (though definitely not out of style!). Let me say this — I am so grateful for this upbringing, and I'm so appreciative for the two people who made me into the woman I am today.

Side note: When some see this, they will simply see the word "old," but if my parents were old, could they take adorable selfies like this?

1. Respect was not requested but required.

This goes for anyone: young, old or in between. The phrase “You have to give respect to get respect" was never a thing for us, instead, it was “Be as respectful as possible, at all times, to all people."

2. Proper manners and etiquette were essential.

"Yes" and "no" were not allowed in our house, and "yeah" or "nah" would get you knocked into next week. "Ma'am" and "Sir" were required. Table manners were used at every meal, and we learned how to set the table in the proper way. And for those of you who think this is strictly a "woman's" thing, my brother sets a better table than I ever could.

3. Boys had to pick you up for dates.

I hated this rule when I hit high school. My thinking was that, if I have a car and can drive, then why does a guy need to pick me up? I have learned that this is not a matter of convenience; it is one of respect.

4. School was serious business.

My mother taught school, so we had to behave and do our very best in school. Let's just say that when I neglected to do so, my parents didn't hesitate to march up to school and have a very awkward conference with my teacher in the middle of the day. It resulted in a lot of tears on my part. And restriction for a month.

5. It was your fault, no one else's.

If your parents were anything like mine, they didn't place the blame on teachers, peers, or anyone else for that matter. We had to take responsibility for every action.

6. Chores were not rewarded because they were expected.

My parents were big supporters of the idea that “you get paid with a roof over your head and food on the table." We had to work around the house and the farm, whether it was cleaning or raking leaves. Here is a rare picture of my siblings and me taking care of one of our daddy's cows.

7. You always felt extremely uncomfortable when other kids sassed their parents.

It literally made my stomach drop when I would hear my friends talk badly to or yell at their parents. I remember feeling shock the first time I experienced this.

8. The sight of a belt still gives you nightmares.

We didn't get time outs. We seldom got sent to our rooms. Instead, our parents would get after us with a belt, a shoe, a switch… Really anything within arms' reach. However, we were never disciplined in excess, and they would always explain why we were getting punished.

9. Participation was expected of you.

My siblings and I were expected to either play sports or work. We weren't allowed to simply go home and shoot the breeze after school. The idea that idle hands are the devil's playthings? Yeah, it's a real thing.

10. You had a curfew, and it was enforced.

I was to be at home by 11:00 p.m. every night because, hey, nothing good happens after midnight, right? This was my curfew until I left to go off to college, and there wasn't a whole lot of wiggle room here.

11. You knew that some outfits would never make it out of the door.

If your pants fit too tightly, you couldn't leave the house. If a shirt cut too low, you had to change. I liked to challenge this rule by getting dressed at friends' houses, so if you ever saw me looking the least bit scandalous, my parents were definitely not aware.

12. Church was not the question, but rather the answer.

When we were younger, my daddy would lead the way as the Meadows family filed into the pew. When I got older and stayed at friends' houses, Mama and Daddy always made sure I took my church clothes with me. It was the very foundation of my faith.

13. Quitting was never an option.

No matter how much you disliked a sport, you had to tough it out until the season finished. Mama didn't raise no quitter, especially when it came to my piano playing.


14. You never doubted you were loved.

I never once had to question if my parents loved me. I have two parents who continually sacrifice everything so that I can have a good start in this world. They gave me a strong sense of wrong and right, and I have them to thank for the strong morals and faith that I have. Words fail me in explaining just how much I love my Mama and Daddy, but know this: without them, I would be nothing. So, Mama and Daddy, thanks for the love that you never failed to give, even when it came in the form of tough love. I'm so lucky that God chose me to be your daughter.

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I'm The Girl Without A 'Friend Group'

And here's why I'm OK with it

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Little things remind me all the time.

For example, I'll be sitting in the lounge with the people on my floor, just talking about how everyone's days went. Someone will turn to someone else and ask something along the lines of, "When are we going to so-and-so's place tonight?" Sometimes it'll even be, "Are you ready to go to so-and-so's place now? Okay, we'll see you later, Taylor!"

It's little things like that, little things that remind me I don't have a "friend group." And it's been like that forever. I don't have the same people to keep me company 24 hours of the day, the same people to do absolutely everything with, and the same people to cling to like glue. I don't have a whole cast of characters to entertain me and care for me and support me. Sometimes, especially when it feels obvious to me, not having a "friend group" makes me feel like a waste of space. If I don't have more friends than I can count, what's the point in trying to make friends at all?

I can tell you that there is a point. As a matter of fact, just because I don't have a close-knit clique doesn't mean I don't have any friends. The friends I have come from all different walks of life, some are from my town back home and some are from across the country. I've known some of my friends for years, and others I've only known for a few months. It doesn't really matter where they come from, though. What matters is that the friends I have all entertain me, care for me, and support me. Just because I'm not in that "friend group" with all of them together doesn't mean that we can't be friends to each other.

Still, I hate avoiding sticking myself in a box, and I'm not afraid to seek out friendships. I've noticed that a lot of the people I see who consider themselves to be in a "friend group" don't really venture outside the pack very often. I've never had a pack to venture outside of, so I don't mind reaching out to new people whenever.

I'm not going to lie, when I hear people talking about all the fun they're going to have with their "friend group" over the weekend, part of me wishes I could be included in something like that. I do sometimes want to have the personality type that allows me to mesh perfectly into a clique. I couldn't tell you what it is about me, but there is some part of me that just happens to function better one-on-one with people.

I hated it all my life up until very recently, and that's because I've finally learned that not having a "friend group" is never going to be the same as not having friends.

SEE ALSO: To The Girls Who Float Between Friend Groups

Cover Image Credit: wordpress.com

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True Tales Of Growing Up In A BIG Family

Spoiler alert, I get tackled a lot.

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I was born into a fairly large family. I have upwards of twenty-something first cousins, many of who are around the same age as me. It has honestly been both a blessing and a curse to have so many people around me all the time. Some of my favorite memories come from family gatherings where all of my cousins were there. However, since most of my cousins are male, there has also been a lot of physical violence where people get hurt, even if the intentions were innocent. I have so many stories about my family, some of which I won't share here because they are a little bit inappropriate, but others are too good not to share.

The first story I want to share is from this past Easter. Most of my cousins on my Dad's side were at my Papa's house celebrating the holiday. There was so much food we could probably feed a small army. Some of the older cousins decided that we were going to play a game of whiffle ball. All of the cousins who were playing were at least sixteen and some of them were much older. Many of us had or are playing sports in High School or College so this game of whiffle ball got extremely competitive very fast. I ended up being the Umpire/pitcher because I played softball for so long. The game ended with my brothers winning and my other cousins upset that they lost, but it was still one of the memories I will cherish the most even though I definitely threw out my shoulder pitching.

I can remember playing a game of football on Thanksgiving when I was young (maybe five or six). This game, not unlike the whiffle ball game we played at Easter, got super competitive super fast to the point where even I, as a six-year-old, was being pushed and tackled to the ground by much older boys. I honestly can't remember much about that game, maybe I got hit in the head too much, but I do remember having so much fun playing with my cousins.

I've been on a cruise two times in my life, both times with my extended family. One cruise was to Mexico when I was very little. What I remember about that cruise was getting extremely sea sick and that the cleaning staff would make towel monkey on our beds. The cruise was to Alaska when I was a lot older, I think I was fifteen. Since I and my cousins were much older on that cruise, we caused a lot more trouble and were able to get away with it. Every night we would go to the pool and swim. Then, we would go to the buffet and only eat pineapples and mac and cheese. We, also, may have or may not have gone into a bar to sing karaoke. While the cruise was fun, I wouldn't have had such a great time if I wasn't with my family.

While sometimes they can be a pain, having so much family has taught me a lot about communication and playing right. Again, I only have scratched the surface here in regards to the plentiful stories I have, many of which are so much funnier. I love my family so much and I would never trade that in for the world.

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