You Might Have Been Raised By Old School Parents If...

You Might Have Been Raised By Old School Parents If...

14 signs you grew up with old-fashioned parents
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If you know me, there are no two people I love more than my parents. However, when I was younger, I realized that not everyone was raised quite like me. My parents raised me in a manner that could be considered to many as "old-fashioned" (though definitely not out of style!). Let me say this—I am so grateful for this upbringing, and I'm so appreciative for the two people who made me into the woman I am today.

Side note: When some see this, they will simply see the word "old," but if my parents were old, could they take adorable selfies like this?

1. Respect was not requested, but required.

This goes for anyone: young, old or in between. The phrase “You have to give respect to get respect” was never a thing for us; instead, it was “Be as respectful as possible, at all times, to all people.”

2. Proper manners and etiquette were essential.

"Yes" and "no" were not allowed in our house, and "yeah" or "nah" would get you knocked into next week. Ma’am and Sir were required. Table manners were used at every meal, and we learned how to set the table in the proper way. And for those of you who think this is strictly a "woman’s" thing, my brother sets a better table than I ever could.

3. Boys had to pick you up for dates.

I hated this rule when I hit high school. My thinking was that, if I have a car and can drive, then why does a guy need to pick me up? I have learned that this is not a matter of convenience; it is one of respect.

4. School was serious business.

My mother taught school, so we had to behave and do our very best in school. Let’s just say that when I neglected to do so, my parents didn’t hesitate to march up to school and have a very awkward conference with my teacher in the middle of the day. It resulted in a lot of tears on my part. And restriction for a month.

5. It was your fault, no one else’s.

If your parents were anything like mine, they didn’t place the blame on teachers, peers, or anyone else for that matter. We had to take responsibility for every action.

6. Chores were not rewarded because they were expected.

My parents were big supporters of the idea that “you get paid with a roof over your head and food on the table.” We had to work around the house and the farm, whether it was cleaning or raking leaves. Here is a rare picture of my siblings and me taking care of one of our daddy's cows.

7. You always felt extremely uncomfortable when other kids sassed their parents.

It literally made my stomach drop when I would hear my friends talk badly to or yell at their parents. I remember feeling shock the first time I experienced this.

8. The sight of a belt still gives you nightmares.

We didn’t get time outs. We seldom got sent to our rooms. Instead, our parents would get after us with a belt, a shoe, a switch… Really anything within arms’ reach. However, we were never disciplined in excess, and they would always explain why we were getting punished.

9. Participation was expected of you.

My siblings and I were expected to either play sports or work. We weren’t allowed to simply go home and shoot the breeze after school. The idea that idle hands are the devil’s playthings? Yeah, it's a real thing.

10. You had a curfew, and it was enforced.

I was to be at home by 11:00 p.m. every night because, hey, nothing good happens after midnight, right? This was my curfew until I left to go off to college, and there wasn’t a whole lot of wiggle room here.

11. You knew that some outfits would never make it out of the door.

If your pants fit too tightly, you couldn’t leave the house. If a shirt cut too low, you had to change. I liked to challenge this rule by getting dressed at friends’ houses, so if you ever saw me looking the least bit scandalous, my parents were definitely not aware.

12. Church was not the question, but rather the answer.

When we were younger, my daddy would lead the way as the Meadows family filed into the pew. When I got older and stayed at friends’ houses, Mama and Daddy always made sure I took my church clothes with me. It was the very foundation of my faith.

13. Quitting was never an option.

No matter how much you disliked a sport, you had to tough it out until the season finished. Mama didn’t raise no quitter, especially when it came to my piano playing.


14. You never doubted you were loved.

I never once had to question if my parents loved me. I have two parents who continually sacrifice everything so that I can have a good start in this world. They gave me a strong sense of wrong and right, and I have them to thank for the strong morals and faith that I have. Words fail me in explaining just how much I love my Mama and Daddy, but know this: without them, I would be nothing. So, Mama and Daddy, thanks for the love that you never failed to give, even when it came in the form of tough love. I’m so lucky that God chose me to be your daughter.


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The Thank You My Dad Deserves

While our moms are always the heroes, our dads deserve some credit, too.
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Dear Dad,

You’ve gone a really long time without being thanked. I'm not talking about thanks for things like opening the Gatorade bottle I couldn't or checking my tires when my car’s maintenance light is flashing, but rather the thanks I owe you for shaping me into the person I am today.

Thank you for teaching me what I deserve and for not letting me settle for anything less.

While the whole world was telling me I wasn’t good enough, you were there to tell me I was. Whether this was with boys, a friend, or anything else, you always built my confidence to a place I couldn’t build it to on my own. You showed me what my great qualities were and helped me feel unique. But most of all, you never let me settle for anything less than what I deserved, even when I wanted to. Without you, I wouldn’t be nearly as ambitious, outgoing or strong.

Thank you for giving me someone to make proud.

It’s hard to work hard when it’s just for myself, but so easy when it’s for you. All through school, nothing made me happier than getting a good grade back because I knew I got to come home and tell you. With everything I do, you give me a purpose.

SEE ALSO: 20 Things You Say When Calling Your Dad On The Phone

Thank you for showing me what selflessness looks like.

You are the prime example of what putting your family first looks like. If me wanting something means that you can’t get what you want, you’ll always sacrifice. From wearing the same t-shirts you’ve had since I was in elementary school so I could buy the new clothes I wanted, to not going out with your friends so you could come to my shows, you never made a decision without your family at the forefront of your mind. If there is one quality you have that I look up to you for the most, it’s your ability to completely put your needs aside and focus entirely on the wants of others.

Thank you for being the voice in the back of my head that shows me wrong from right.

Even though many of your dad-isms like “always wear a seatbelt” easily get old, whenever I’m in a situation and can’t decide if what I’m doing is right or wrong, I always can hear you in the back of my head pointing me in the right direction. While I may not boost your ego often enough by telling you you’re always right, you are.

Thank you for being real with me when nobody else will.

Being your child hasn’t always been full of happiness and encouragement, but that’s what makes you such an integral part of my life. Rather than sugarcoating things and always telling me I was the perfect child, you called me out when I was wrong. But what separates you from other dads is that instead of just knocking me down, you helped me improve. You helped me figure out my faults and stood by me every step of the way as I worked to fix them.

Most of all, thank you for showing me what a great man looks like.

I know that marriage may seem very far down the road, but I just want you to know that whoever the guy I marry is, I know he’ll be right because I have an amazing guy to compare him to. I know you’re not perfect (nobody is), but you’ve raised me in a such a way that I couldn’t imagine my kids being raised any differently. Finding a guy with your heart, drive, and generosity will be tough, but I know it will be worth it.


Dad, you’re more than just my parent, but my best friend. You’re there for me like nobody else is and I couldn’t imagine being where I am now without you.

Love you forever,

Your little girl

Cover Image Credit: Caity Callan

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Michigan's Proposal Three

Why expanding voting access can only improve Michigan's democratic system

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Last month, the Michigan Board of Canvassers gave the green light to a ballot proposal aimed at overhauling Michigan's electoral laws to add reforms like automatic and election day voter registration and straight ticket voting. A Detroit News Poll completed earlier this October showed "majority support" for the proposal and for good reason. From increasing voter enfranchisement to allowing for voters to vote more efficiently, this proposal can only help Michigan's population be more civically engaged by allowing more voters to get involved in the election process.

Although Michigan's voter turnout of 63% during the 2016 presidential election is higher than the national average of 58%, it is still lower than it was in previous years, such as when it was over 66% during the 2008 presidential election. Also, according to data from the Secretary of State, there are 200,000 Michiganders of voting age that are not registered voters. While this deficit seems small in comparison to Michigan's overall population of nearly 10 million, it is important that any number of potential voters can make all the difference in an important election. Recall that Trump only won Michigan by a little over 11,000 votes in the 2016 election. Maybe 200,000 additional votes could have made a difference. By allowing citizens of voting age to easily register to vote the day of an election through an automatic process that should reduce the level of work on the voter's part. While the specific details of this automated process are still being decided, there should be no reason to dispute Proposal Three in terms of voter enfranchisement, since involving more citizens in our electoral process is nothing if not meritorious.

Another important provision of Proposal Three is re-implementing the practice of straight ticket voting. This means that there will be an option on your ballot that automatically allows you to vote for all the the candidates in a political party in a single action. To explain, you would not have to bubble in each candidate individually if you intend to vote for only candidates of a single party. While opponents of this practice have argued that it decreases voter volition since it may encourage voters to not actually look at who is running for office and vote along overly partisan lines, approximately 30% of voters nationwide did not complete their ballots in recent elections nationwide. This may be because of the sheer number of candidates that larger voting districts may have. Chicago, while not in Michigan, has over 101 candidates on the average ballot. Larger regions in Michigan such as the metro-Detroit area likely have ballots that are similar in length and complexity to Chicago. By allowing people to vote for the political party they subscribe to in a quick and efficient manner through straight ticket voting, more voters may be incentivized to actually come out and vote in elections, which once again leads to Proposal Three increasing the democratic representativeness of Michigan elections.

As previously mentioned, Michigan voters will be deciding the fate of Proposal Three in the upcoming November 6th midterm elections. I strongly urge all Michigan voters to support this measure because, again, there simply is so much civic benefit to be gained at so little cost.



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