Why You Should Check Out HonorSociety.org

Why You Should Check Out HonorSociety.org

College Magazine ranked HonorSociety.org as one of the top 5 honor societies you should join.
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Have you ever been invited to join an honor society? Invitations may seem like a surprise in your inbox, given you weren't necessarily expecting them, but then again who is? Of course, you'd like to read reviews and learn more to make sure it is worth the time, effort, and dues. Let’s take a look at what makes HonorSociety.org a unique opportunity for any student looking to go further, and why College Magazine has ranked it as one of the top 5 honor societies you should join.

HonorSociety.org is a technology-driven society that helps connect members to people and opportunities to help them succeed. The mission of HonorSociety.org is to help members maximize their academic, leadership, and networking opportunities.

The benefits for members of HonorSociety.org range from career guides to travel discounts, and health and dental plan discounts. The best part about HonorSociety.org is that it is a community which recognizes its members' merits long after graduation, as members are still eligible for benefits after they receive their diploma. Members also have the opportunity to apply for scholarships for their achievements based on their GPAs, service to the community, etc., all while motivating them to maintain their high grades for future scholarship opportunities. Members also have the option to wear HonorSociety.org regalia at graduation, recognizing their membership in the society.

HonorSociety.org also has a network of partners, which includes universities, corporations, associations, and nonprofits. The society is also very active and has large followings on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube ensuring that you can connect with the society and high achievers on your social network of choice.

Furthermore, your involvement will not only be through a computer screen— you can actually meet fellow members and alumni by attending one of the society's exclusive member trips, traveling to places such as Washington, D.C. or Los Angeles. While on their most recent trip in D.C., members enjoyed networking opportunities on Capitol Hill, a member banquet and ceremony, tours of famous memorials, historic buildings, and museums. Their next national member conference will be in October 2016 in Seattle, Washington.

Once you join HonorSociety.org, you will gain access to a personal online profile on the society's website, which will help build your personal brand on the internet. The organization also has a job search feature, which will allow you to search over 20 million jobs that range from part-time jobs to full-time positions.

The organization rewards you for dedicating time to maintaining a high GPA and achieving academic goals. If you want to be more involved, members can become featured writers and have articles published nationally. You can even get involved with the chapter at your university or start a chapter at your school by becoming a founding member. This position offers extensive leadership experience -- an essential tool for life (not to mention, it looks great on a resume). If you have been invited to join, these reasons make it clear that it's worth the time to check out HonorSociety.org.

Cover Image Credit: HonorSociety.org

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A Recent Sports Bra Suspension At Rowan University Has Gotten Female Athletes Outraged

A recent ban was placed on the Men and Women's Cross Country Athletes from using their designated practice facility.

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UPDATE: Following the publication of this article, Rowan University administration has released a statement ending the sports bra ban and a statement regarding the usage of athletic facilities by the Cross Country team.

If you're running in a sports bra, then you must be asking for it, right? Well, according to a football player at Rowan University, this is true.

I'll have you know the real reason women run in sports bras, and it's not to show off our hard-earned abs. Women, whether they have a six-pack or not, run in sports bras because, quite frankly, it's hot outside. We run in sports bras because our workouts are demanding, challenging, and vigorous.

We run in sports bras because we are confident, hardworking student-athletes.

We do not run in a sports bra as a way to show off our bodies in attempts to distract men.

Out of the 15 Rowan University Women Cross Country athletes, all of them believe running in sports bras at practice should be allowed. Even the girls who don't partake in shirtless runs at practice still believe the other members of the team should be permitted to wear whatever they feel confident in.

The Cross Country team at Rowan is one of the only teams that is not provided with a daily uniform to practice in. With that being said, how is it expected for the women on this team to partake in an non-existing dress code?

A meeting was held with the Women's Cross Country Coach and the Athletic Director to address this issue resulting in the verdict of the women on the team no longer being able to run in sports bras. If that wasn't already enough of an outrage, it was also decided the women were no longer allowed to run on the track.

Women running around the track in sports bras at their own practice were claimed to be distracting to the football players on the field during the same time.

As if the women no longer being able to run in sports bras wasn't enough, now they're no longer allowed to run on the track, period. The girls are now mandated to run on the local high school track on workout days.

In 2015, Rowan University officially finished their new $4.6 million athletic practice facility. The practice facility includes two fields for football, soccer, field hockey, and lacrosse athletes. There is a dedicated practice area for each team. The men and women Cross Country teams have their track. Now they no longer have that privilege.

The problem here is not the women on the team. The problem is not the women wearing sports bras. The problem is not women's bodies.

Rape culture is the problem.

The fact that the Athletic Department supports the claim of this being distracting, or the women "asking for it," is disgusting. Mind you, the Athletic Department put together a video involving student-athletes addressing rape culture and how it is not tolerated here. Oh, is that so?

"As girls, we could look at the football team and say that their tight pants showing off everything is asking for it, but we don't. When we are on the track, we are doing a hard workout that requires all our focus, so we aren't looking at them and what they are doing. If they are distracted by us, then their practices clearly don't require their full attention, or they just aren't as committed to the sport." -Anonymous source

In the world of professional athletics, all female Elite runners are permitted to wear racing crop tops. Not only are they non-restricting, but they are a trendy, comfortable, and empowering part of the running culture.

As women, we are constantly reminded that we should be ashamed or embarrassed about our bodies. It's 2018, and yet women are still being objectified with their physical appearance.

As a nation, we are taking a step back into history, and as a University, we are teaching student-athletes that this is acceptable.

The women on this team not only represent the University but the growing community of female runners. It's time women are allowed to embrace their bodies and not live in constant fear of being degraded by men.

Women, athletes or not, deserve to use their voice and take a stance. The future generations are watching. Let's set a good example.


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Personal Development Is Just As Important as Professional Development

Stop killing yourself with internships, jobs and taking another class, and focus on growing internally.

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As a senior, preparing for graduation, I see my younger friends begin to stress, in NOVEMBER, for summer jobs, internships, and trying to balance an unpaid internship, a job on the side, a few summer classes, and leadership positions in all those organizations they're a part of. And that's awesome, I'd feel lucky to hire them!

But time and mistakes have given me wisdom, and in all that time breaking my back to prepare myself for post-grad, I've learned that as important as professional development is, personal development is just as important.

My first two years at Ohio State, I was so focused on diversifying my resume and making myself "special" and "memorable", that I completely drove myself into the ground. I was depressed, anxious, and lost myself in all that work I was breaking my back over. I had absolutely nothing to help me in an interview, and I was so awkward and surface level that no matter how incredible my experiences were, how great my grades were, it wouldn't matter. No one who interviewed me would ever hire me.

So I took a step back, I took a summer to work a crappy job in a restaurant, where I worked long nights just to be there to open the next morning. I didn't take classes, and I focused on growing as a person. Becoming more kind, compassionate, and confident in myself and my skills. I had to do nothing in order to realize what I was good at.

I'm good with people. I make people feel important and listened to. That's my skill set. I'm smart, sure, but that's not my biggest skill.

After that summer? I changed my major, from engineering to nursing, and started working smarter, not harder. I applied for jobs that would both bring me joy and help me develop my nursing skills, and I ran for leadership positions that focused on the people instead of just whatever position I was qualified for.

I applied for positions I was absolutely, positively not qualified for, and made myself willing to toot my own horn if I was lucky enough to get an interview. I refused to take no for an answer, choosing instead to find a different way to my goals.

And as I prepare to graduate from The Ohio State University after four really fucking hard years, this is the best advice I can give. Grow internally, grow your personality and strengths outside the classroom before you focus on your "real life" skills. Sure, you might have fewer experiences that your classmates, but when it comes down to an interview or a career fair, you're going to be the one recruiters remember, because you will be so unapologetically you. And at the end of the day, isn't that what really matters?

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