Why I'm Not Ashamed to be a Nasty Woman

Why I'm Not Ashamed to be a Nasty Woman

You can't be annoyed at feminism being called feminism when the entire history of the human race is called mankind.
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Feminism has become a term that was been twisted and misconstrued in so many different ways. Many people don't like when an argument is different from their point of view. For example, when the Black Lives Matter group was formed and a week later came the All Lives Matter group; people don't understand that we're not undermining others, we are addressing a problem.

Feminism does not mean we hate men.

Feminism means that I want to be treated equal to a man. I don't want to live my days knowing that I'm being degraded because I'm a woman.

Being a woman does not mean I'm weak.

Why is it that the worst things a woman can be called are "slut", "whore", "bitch", or "skank" while the worst thing a guy can be called is a "pussy" or even a "mangina"? Why is it that being a woman is the worst insult that there is?

You can't be annoyed at feminism being called feminism when the entire history of the human race is called mankind.

While equal treatment is the root of feminism, rape culture is the biggest concern.

Every one out of six women will experience some type of sexual assault in their life time, 28% of them before the age of 15.

We have been taught that we can't wear provocative clothing because that will attract the wrong type of people. That we have to be careful and go out in pairs on a night out so as not to get attacked. That if anything happens, it's our fault.

And the world wonders why rape victims don't come forward.

When you hear a story of a woman being raped, the most common question is "what was she wearing" or "was she intoxicated"? Followed up by statements of "she was asking for it" or "she didn't say no".

If the word yes does not escape my lips, I am not consenting.

Why is it that in today's world, unless we say no that we were the ones who did something wrong? Why is it that men get the free pass?

The men get praised or sympathized with for their amazing academics or skilled athletic performance as if being talented is a free pass for rape.

Nobody ever asks what a woman's rapist was wearing.

I don't want a rap whistle, I want change.

Rape culture and patriarchal values are killing girls while feminism is upsetting white boys on the internet.

If she's too young for her to be wearing "shorts that short", she's also too young for you to be sexualizing her body for wearing them.

I hate when people say "you're a girl, so act like one" as if my vagina came with a terms and conditions manual.

In the words of G.D Anderson, "Feminism isn't about making women stronger. Women are already strong. It's about changing the way the world perceives that strength."

I am proud to be labeled a "nasty woman" because I believe in love, acceptance, equality, kindness, respect and the power of my voice.

I'm proud to be a nasty woman because my body is not someone else's business.

Because I believe that women shouldn't be punished for the actions of someone else.

Because being a female should not mean having to avoid eye contact with men to not draw attention to themselves as a potential target.

Because one day I want my daughter to not have to fear walking the streets or to be afraid of being herself for the fear of others actions. We need to be the generation of women who will teach their sons to act respectfully instead of teaching our daughters to beware.

Because if men and women should be held to the same standards and women can't say something that may hurt a mans feelings, neither should they.

Because we should be equal no matter the circumstances.

Woman need to scream about the importance of feminism to the world until our voices become so hoarse that it's mistaken for a mans and people actually start to listen to us.

The fact that woman need to justify feminism by explaining how it benefits men is the perfect example of why we need feminism.

I believe that the election of Donald Trump has brought forth the fiercest, smartest, toughest generation of ass-kicking women this country could ever imagine.

I'm a feminist, a nasty woman. I've been a female for a long time now. It'd be stupid not to be on my own side.

Our rights aren't up for grabs. Neither are we.

So don't be ashamed or allow people to shame you for being a feminist. It just means you're ready for a world where you matter just as much as a man.

Cover Image Credit: Google

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'As A Woman,' I Don't Need To Fit Your Preconceived Political Assumptions About Women

I refuse to be categorized and I refuse to be defined by others. Yes, I am a woman, but I am so much more.

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It is quite possible to say that the United States has never seen such a time of divisiveness, partisanship, and extreme animosity of those on different sides of the political spectrum. Social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are saturated with posts of political opinions and are matched with comments that express not only disagreement but too often, words of hatred. Many who cannot understand others' political beliefs rarely even respect them.

As a female, Republican, college student, I feel I receive the most confusion from others regarding my political opinions. Whenever I post or write something supporting a conservative or expressing my right-leaning beliefs and I see a comment has been left, I almost always know what words their comment will begin with. Or in conversation, if I make my beliefs known and someone begins to respond, I can practically hear the words before they leave their mouth.

"As a woman…"

This initial phrase is often followed by a question, generally surrounding how I could publicly support a Republican candidate or maintain conservative beliefs. "As a woman, how can you support Donald Trump?" or "As a woman, how can you support pro-life policies?" and, my personal favorite, "As a woman, how did you not want Hillary for president?"

Although I understand their sentiment, I cannot respect it. Yes, being a woman is a part of who I am, but it in no way determines who I am. My sex has not and will not adjudicate my goals, my passions, or my work. It will not influence the way in which I think or the way in which I express those thoughts. Further, your mention of my sex as the primary logic for condemning such expressions will not change my adherence to defending what I share. Nor should it.

To conduct your questioning of my politics by inferring that my sex should influence my ideology is not only offensive, it's sexist.

It disregards my other qualifications and renders them worthless. It disregards my work as a student of political science. It disregards my hours of research dedicated to writing about politics. It disregards my creativity as an author and my knowledge of the subjects I choose to discuss. It disregards the fundamental human right I possess to form my own opinion and my Constitutional right to express that opinion freely with others. And most notably, it disregards that I am an individual. An individual capable of forming my own opinions and being brave enough to share those with the world at the risk of receiving backlash and criticism. All I ask is for respect of that bravery and respect for my qualifications.

Words are powerful. They can be used to inspire, unite, and revolutionize. Yet, they can be abused, and too comfortably are. Opening a dialogue of political debate by confining me to my gender restricts the productivity of that debate from the start. Those simple but potent words overlook my identity and label me as a stereotype destined to fit into a mold. They indicate that in our debate, you cannot look past my sex. That you will not be receptive to what I have to say if it doesn't fit into what I should be saying, "as a woman."

That is the issue with politics today. The media and our politicians, those who are meant to encourage and protect democracy, divide us into these stereotypes. We are too often told that because we are female, because we are young adults, because we are a minority, because we are middle-aged males without college degrees, that we are meant to vote and to feel one way, and any other way is misguided. Before a conversation has begun, we are divided against our will. Too many of us fail to inform ourselves of the issues and construct opinions that are entirely our own, unencumbered by what the mainstream tells us we are meant to believe.

We, as a people, have become limited to these classifications. Are we not more than a demographic?

As a student of political science, seeking to enter a workforce dominated by men, yes, I am a woman, but foremost I am a scholar, I am a leader, and I am autonomous. I refuse to be categorized and I refuse to be defined by others. Yes, I am a woman, but I am so much more.

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7 Different Types Of People In Your College Lecture

Here are some of the... interesting... people that you will most DEFINITELY see in your college lectures.

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Over the many college lectures that I've attended in the last year, I've picked up on seven different types of students that I see in every one of my classes. Honestly, I hate to admit it but I've been at least one of these people during my college career. Hopefully, this list makes you laugh and teaches you what NOT to do during lecture!

1. The Over-Achiever 

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This student has their entire life together. They have their laptop open to the lecture slides and they are taking additional, organized notes in their notebook. They've done all of the class readings beforehand and they have come prepared with questions to ask the professor after the lecture. We all wish we could be this person.

2. The Pretentious Know-It-All

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This person will go to EXTRAORDINARY lengths to show everyone how smart they are. They sit at the very front of the lecture hall and constantly raise their hand to correct the professor on any issue that comes up. Rather than coming off as knowledgeable, this person just looks like a jerk. This sure won't get you in the good graces of the professor. Please, don't be like this.

3. The Gabber aka the person that LITERALLY won't shut up

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This is the person that sits behind you and talks to their friends THE ENTIRE CLASS. Instead of learning about chemistry, you've now been educated on the juicy drama between "Gabby" from Delta Sigma Delta and "Chad" from Sigma Apple Pie.

4. The Slacker 

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This is the student that rolls up to class half an hour late and sits in the very back. Then they proceed to ask you, "Uhhhhh, what class is this again??" and "Can I borrow some paper and a pencil?"

5. The Interrupter 

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The interrupter is always in a rush. First, they show up late to every class. Then, rather than taking an open seat in the back or on the end of a row, they interrupt everyone else by walking over them to a seat smack dab in the middle of the classroom. As they bulldoze their way to the middle, they are hitting people in the head with their backpack and dropping their Hydroflask, making an even BIGGER disruption.

6. The Sleeper

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Not gonna lie, I've been this person more than once. The sleeper was probably up late last night and needs just a quick power nap… which then turns into an entire class time of zzzzzzs. If you're gonna nap, please sit in the back. Oh, and for the love of God, DON'T SNORE.

7. The Eater

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Instead of bringing just a couple of light snacks to lecture, this person brings A WHOLE THANKSGIVING MEAL. I do not want to smell your day-old Chipotle while I'm learning about chemical bonds, please.

As you can see, there are many different characters in college lecture halls. But what can I say? It makes every day interesting! Are you any of these people??

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