20 Reasons Why Baseball SZN Is The BEST SZN

20 Reasons Why Baseball SZN Is The BEST SZN

"There's no crying in baseball!"

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"There's no crying in baseball!" (Tom Hanks in "A League Of Their Own").

There has never been a truer sentence than that one. The start of baseball season means the start of summer, long nights, good food and memories being made. What movies are the ones that turn out to be classics? Baseball movies. There truly is nothing better than going out to the ballpark (except for maybe the traffic).

Still not convinced? Well, I'm here to prove to you that baseball is America's past time for a multitude of reasons...

1. There's nothing like cheering in the stands

2. Peanuts and cracker jacks? Sign me up

3. Actually, all ballpark food is pretty much the bomb. Hotdogs, burgers, beer, fries, and my personal favorite, Dippin' Dots!

4. The different traditions that each ballpark has. The Nationals have the President mascots race and the Orioles always open the game by playing "Magic To Do."

5. The patriotism and pride you feel when the Star Spangled Banner is sung

6. The excitement of the first pitch of the game!

7. Whenever a home run is hit!

8. And when balls are hit into the stadium

9. Watching to see if you make it on the Jumbotron and when you do, waving and taking in your 5 seconds of fame

10. Two words: Baseball. Butts.

11. Who doesn't love the 7th inning stretch when everyone sings "Take Me Out To The Ballgame??" (also, does any other sport have a special song that they sing at every game no matter who's playing? Didn't think so)

12. That fun game of getting the attention of a vendor and then the occasional group effort of the crowd to get the money to the vendor and the beer to the buyer but teamwork makes the dream work

13. When it's a doubleheader!

14. When it's the bottom of the eighth inning

15. The iconic kiss cam

16. Being able to see your favorite players live in person (even if you are in the nosebleed section)

17. Sometimes the ballpark gives away free stuff like t-shirts! Even if they don't, getting souvenirs is always exciting!

18. I would argue that baseball is one of the least stressful sports to watch simply because of the flow of the game and the atmosphere surrounds you

19. Dippin Dots. I know I said that before but there's nothing like eating Dippin' Dots and watching some ball

20. Baseball has a long, rich, colorful history that makes the game so iconic and fun and once you go to a game, you'll understand what I'm talking about

So, while football, hockey and soccer games can be fun to go to, they're nothing quite like a good 'ol baseball game! Baseball is called America's pastime for a reason. The game is a time-honored tradition that keeps the fans coming. It's truly a home run for all!

Cover Image Credit:

Maddy Whitfield

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Why College Athletes Should Not Be Paid

Dont they already get enough?
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Throughout the years big name college athletes have been trying to get six-digit numbers in their bank account before making it to the pros. What they do not understand is that college is not a place of work and that it is meant to further education for a future career. Also, no college, big or small, has enough money to pay them. They have to pay to build facilities, pay coaches, give scholarships, and pay athletic directors to make sure that the school has the best chance of winning. Despite the fact that most athletes do not have money to get by while they are in college, schools do not gain enough revenue back from the money that they put into their sports programs. They are technically already paid with a free education due to their scholarship, and all of the different sports would not be able to be paid the same amount.

If colleges were to pay their athletes, there would not be as much money to go around for any of the other things like the facilities or the coaches. Not only do colleges not have enough money, but it would also defeat the purpose of going to school. If athletes were to start getting paid, it would give people a reason to talk about paying other students in the school. “If we pay the athletes maybe we should also do it for the first violinist in the school orchestra, or the lead actor in theatrical productions, and perhaps popular professors should allocate course enrollment slots to those students who bid the highest" according to Andrew Zimbalist of theatlantic.com. It would also make the cost of college more expensive. The money would have to come from somewhere. That would just make it harder for a regular student to attend a college. According to star.txstate.edu, it would be really unfair to the other students. Some if not all college athletes are already on scholarships, so why should they be paid like they are professionals? Many college athletes argue that since they do not have time to get jobs that they should be paid by the university so that they can have extra money to spend. What they do not realize is that the average college student is middle class and has to pay their way through school. It is not that since they do not play a sport they have money to spend. These students would kill to have their school paid for and all they would have to worry about is their grades.

It would really ruin the culture of college sports. College students love college sports because the athletes are students just like they are. The athletes are in classes and are seen on campus. They are a part of the school's community. Money would separate the athletes from the student body. It would make them seem like they are the most important people at the school.

Another thing is that some athletes do not stay in school the four years to earn their degrees, so they will take up classroom space for one or two years and it is free. Some athletes don't even deserve the education that they are being given. For example, the valedictorian of my high school class really wanted to go to Georgetown. She got in, but tuition was over $75,000 a year, yet there are athletes that go to this school for free and probably do not have the grades to even be there. Former NBA star Allen Iverson who barely graduated high school and will tell you himself that he hated school, got to go to Georgetown for free, and he only stayed for one year.

Forbes.com was also able to bring up some good points. Football and basketball are the two sports that most people think of when it comes to athletes being paid. What about the other sports? Athletes participate in sports like soccer, tennis, golf, baseball, volleyball, track and field. They work just as hard as football and basketball players, but just because they do not generate as much money they have to be treated differently than the people that work out in the same facilities as they do. Even if it were possible for athletes to be paid they should all be paid the same. Some people claim that football and men's basketball should be the only sports to be paid because those are the sports that generate the bulk of the revenue. This would be violating the federal Title IX law. This law stipulates equal compensation for male and female athletes. Besides the issue of paying the participants of every sport, there is also the issue of everyone being paid — should you just pay your elite athletes or the whole team? How much would you pay players? Is it one set amount for every athlete, or will there be pro-like contracts? If you let athletes get paid for endorsements, will it give some programs unfair advantages? If someone plays for a school like Alabama they are more likely to get an endorsement than if they were playing for a school like Tulsa. It is the same issue with allowing profit off merchandise sold with their name or number. Playing for Florida would give a better opportunity to make a profit off of merchandise than playing for Western Michigan.

Also, imagine a coach trying to discipline a college player if they were paid. Even if they know they messed up all they would care about is the money. Paying them would affect their character and it would affect the way they act if they were to go out in the real world and play professionally. College teaches you about life and tells you to be disciplined. It is hard to be disciplined when you are getting paid a lot of money.

One thing that may surprise the reader of this paper is that most colleges, even the big name ones, do not even make the money back that they put into their sports programs. Despite all the tickets, merchandise, and memorabilia that these big name universities sell, they cannot break even. According to theatlantic.com, the average FBS athletic program ran a $9.44 million operating deficit. This brings up the question where would the money come from?

While researching on forbes.com only 14 athletic programs are generating a profit without having to rely on institutional support like student fees. Ohio state university needs over $22 million from the booster club in order to balance. OSU could ask the boosters for money to pay the players, but what would a school like Western Kentucky do? They already spend 5.6 million on grants-in-aid and it takes 8.2 million from the university to balance their budget. How would they pay their players?

One thing that shocked me while I was doing research on thestate.com was that the athletes that are basically impoverished receive a federal supplement every semester. It is called Pell Grant money. Qualified college athletes receive up to $5,645 put in their bank accounts a year. The athlete can choose to spend this money in any way they want. So it is pretty much up to them to be smart with it and not blow it on something stupid. This money is meant to help athletes from impoverished backgrounds live like average students without hardship.

Dawn Staley, the South Carolina women's basketball coach grew up in the Philadelphia projects. She earned a full scholarship to Virginia where she qualified for the maximum amount of Pell Grant money. “Things came up. I didn't have much when I went to school. When you see other people with things, you're a kid, you want them. If you don't have them, you don't feel like you're having the full experience of being in college." Staley's example from two decades ago still applies today. The athletes that need it the most are taken care of through Pell Grants. They do not need the extra money. These grants are distributed based on the annual income of an athlete's family. The lower the income the higher the grant.

Most fans of college sports do not know that the NCAA allows for additional help to athletes through the student athlete opportunity fund. It is intended to provide direct benefits to student athletes or their families as determined by conference officers. Some of the benefits include non-athletics related health expenses that are not covered by an athlete's insurance plan, travel expenses for an athlete to attend funerals or family emergencies, and a $200 annual clothing allowance, as long as Pell Grants are available.

A big reason college athletes should not be paid is simply because they are not professionals. College athletes are people that are trying to get to the pros and therefore, are not paid because they have not made it yet. Since these players are in college, they should never be paid to play their sport. College sports are just like another class. College students pick something that they want to major in so that they can learn and start a career. College sports should be treated the same way. “I am a broadcast journalism major and no one pays me to set up interviews, anchor a show or broadcast on the college radio station, U92 FM. The reason why no one pays me to do any of that is because I am learning my field in order to get paid when I get a job. In college sports you play to get to the pros, not to earn a paycheck as a student." says Josh Cooper of bdlsports.net. What people forget about college athletes is that they are student athletes. The word student comes before athlete. No one in college gets paid to get an A+ or pass an important test. College is a place where you learn to grow up and how to manage your life.

The biggest reason why college athletes should not be paid is that having a scholarship is technically a form of pay. No, the athlete does not get that money to spend on whatever they want, but the most important thing is paid for. The average college student would kill to have their school already paid for. Not only does a college athlete have a chance to go pro in a sport but they have a chance to finish a degree, which can be used if the pros do not go as planned.

While reading an article by John Rocker from wind.com I discovered that college athletes also have the opportunity to meet the boosters of the schools that they play for. A school's boosters club is made up of alumni that give a lot of money to the school. They most likely own their own businesses. This is another job opportunity for an athlete. If the pros do not work out the booster could remember the athlete's buzzer beater against their rival and give them a job.

In closing, there are too many questions that need to be answered and too many issues that would arise from college athletes getting paid. A college athlete has a ton of privileges and opportunities. There is no reason why they should be paid. Their school is free, they have a chance of getting a job if the pros don't work out and there is just not enough money to go around.

Cover Image Credit: YouTube
Cover Image Credit: Post and Courier

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What Bryce Harper's Insane Contract Means For Other Big Timers In The MLB

Large sums of money cause large sums of conversation throughout the league.

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After finally reaching a deal with the Philadelphia Phillies, which is composed of a humble $330 million, Bryce Harper has stirred up a great amount of chatter throughout the MLB.

After seeing the negotiations pan out between the Philadelphia club and the star outfielder, experts started asking what this agreement will mean for the other big names in baseball. Although Harper was not the only one to receive an insane deal, with Manny Machado signing with the San Diego Padres for $300 million after two consecutive World Series appearances with the Dodgers, his stood out the most.

As soon as Harper declared free-agency, all eyes were on him and where he would end up for the 2019 season. The months of speculations and predictions ended abruptly with a shocking sum of money promised to the outfielder from a Phillies team that had a sub-par season in 2018. Soon after, all eyes were on Mike Trout, the Los Angeles Angels star, who is nearing the end of his time with the Los Angeles club.

Trout had by far the most impressive and successful personal season in all of the MLB in 2018. His power at the plate and speed in the outfield set him apart from nearly everyone in the league. However, the Angels' lack of success held Trout back from being in the spotlight.

As his time comes to an end with the struggling club, Trout is a top prospect for many clubs. There has even been chatter of Harper "recruiting" Trout to Philly for the 2020 season. However, Harper's extreme deal should give hope to Trout. There is no sign of clubs being frugal with their budget on these big-ticket players and that will remain true for the star outfielder.

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