Theodore Roosevelt said, "In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing." Sometimes, there's a clear right and wrong when you're presented with a choice. Often, the right choice isn't the easiest one. But something I have been so challenged by in my young adult life is the need to make a decision when there isn't really a right or wrong in the scenario.

A lot of times we joke saying, "I don't like making decisions!" This can be about anything from where you should eat for dinner or what you should say back to your boss's text. If you're anything like me, you consult people. A lot. I ask my coworkers for scheduling advice like, "Should I run to the grocery store before my workout or after?" Not that I think there's anything wrong with this, but it made me realize how nervous and anxious I can be about simply being wrong.

I think the warning Theodore Roosevelt gives in the above quote is so important in our journey through life. There isn't always going to be a black and white answer when an issue arises. But teetering between two choices more often means not making a decision at all. Stagnation is promoted by fear.

The best way to get over the fear of making the wrong choice, is just to make a choice. As simple as it sounds, the wrong choice isn't always as scary as you think. Often times, it's meant to serve you as a learning experience. Even if the wrong choice is painful, not to be harsh, but such is life. You will get the opportunity to prove that you have learned from your mistakes or allow someone else to learn from you. The important thing to remember is that the worst choice is no choice at all. Don't be afraid to be wrong or to be a guide for someone else.