Adidas original logo is the most famous logo

The Trefoil Logo Of Adidas Will Never Go Out Of Style

The brand with the three stripes known as Adidas continues to be a staple in fashion.

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On August 18,1949 in Herzogenaurach Germany, the brand Adidas was founded by Adolf Dassler. The first logo Adidas had was the three stripes. When Adidas began to become recognized, its famous trefoil logo was developed in 1972 when Germany hosted the Olympic Games in Munich. After that, another logo developed known as the original three striped logo and was launched in 1997. Although there are three different logos, the trefoil logo to this day is one of the most recognized logos. To read and here more history about the Adidas brand check out the link from Adidas here: https://www.adidas-group.com/en/group/profile/

I myself am a fan of the trefoil logo of Adidas and the brand in general. Roughly half of my wardrobe is filled with the trefoil logo. In my opinion, I find the trefoil logo to look much better than the logo with the three stripes. I started adding Adidas apparel in my wardrobe two years ago, but this past year I have grown a special love for the trefoil logo.

Adidas has the mission to be the best sports company in the world. As a kid, I always remember buying all my gear with the Adidas brand: the cleats, shinguard, shorts, and socks were all Adidas. I was so happy when a brand new Adidas Original store opened up in Wicker Park last winter. You can often find me at that store too!

Despite the different logos Adidas has come up with, there is no denying that people can recognize them. It truly is a brand that deserves to be worn. Unlike the Nike logo with the simple check mark, I believe that Adidas has more of a history and has a more unique logo (sorry Nike fans!) Plus, college students can get 15% off their online orders when they verify their student status! How neat is that? The Adidas trefoil logo will always have a special place in my heart.

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ASU Students Push For A Healthier Dining Hall To Counter 'Freshman 15' Fears

The freshman 15 is an avoidable curse, but many students will continue to follow into its trap.

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Arizona State University students are pushing for change within the downtown Phoenix dining hall as they strive to avoid the infamous freshman 15.

The downtown Phoenix campus offers fewer dining options than the Tempe campus and has a less appetizing dining hall. The freshman 15 is a common scare among students living in the dorms, who are often freshman.

The freshman 15 is defined as a student who gains 15 pounds or more in their first year of college. Studies prove the average freshman does not exercise the right amount, is sleep deprived, has a poor diet, increases their stress level, alcohol consumption, and fatty food intake, which is most likely causing their weight gain.

Lauren Hernandez

Daniella Rudoy, a journalism major and fitness instructor at the SDFC, relived her freshman year as she provided tips for incoming freshman.

"There are a lot of workouts you can do in your dorm room as long as you have access to YouTube or a floor. You can go on a run, a walk, or do exercises that do not require equipment," Rudoy said in support of college fitness.

Rudoy said that mental health, fitness, and nutrition all correlate with one another.

"I follow the saying abs are made in the kitchen. So if you are working out day and night, but eating a giant pizza and chicken wings with a pack of beer when you come home you aren't doing yourself much good," Rudoy said.

Lauren Hernandez

The main cause for weight gain is increased alcohol consumption. 80 percent of college students drink and this includes binge-drinking, which is unhealthy for many reasons.

Students who do not drink are most likely gaining weight because of their exposure to an all-you-can-eat dining hall. The downtown Phoenix campus offers a salad bar as their only consistent healthy option for students, therefore students are left eating hamburgers, fries, and pizza.

"I haven't been to the dining hall this semester. Last semester, I went because I had no other options. I am a vegetarian and the dining hall is not accommodating to those with allergies or food restrictions. I find it very difficult to find vegetarian options," Lexi Varrato, a journalism major said.

Lauren Hernandez

Varrato explained that she believes the freshman 15 is "100% real" and that incoming freshmen should research their meal plans and ask their school how their dietary restrictions will be accommodated before purchasing a non-refundable meal plan.

Megan Tretter, a nursing major at Seattle University emphasized that not every dining hall is like ASU's and that the freshman 15 is "definitely not a problem" at her school.

"I always eat healthy at my dining hall. There are a lot of good and healthy options at Seattle University. I usually go to the smoothie line in the morning, have a salad for lunch, and make myself an acai bowl after work with avocado toast in our floor's kitchen," Tretter said in support of her school's strive for healthy options.

College students across the United States have healthier dining options than ASU, but many colleges still face the same problems that students here are facing.

Tara Shultz, a journalism major at ASU believes she has avoided the "very real" freshman 15 by living at home.

"I believe the freshman 15 targets dorm residence and first-year students who do not live at home as they do not have their parents as a guide and are forced to eat at a dining hall that only serves fatty foods," Shultz emphasized.

Lauren Hernandez

The downtown Phoenix campus offers students access to the SDFC, YMCA, and Taylor Place gym, where students can take group fitness classes, run on a track, play basketball, or swim. Alternative options for students are purchasing a membership at Orangetheory or EOS Fitness.

Most students agreed with journalism major Vanessa Gonzalez that they have little time to work out due to their workload, but many students like Varrato, Tretter, and Rudoy explained that they try to work out every day as it is a stress reliever and it enriches their mental health.

Steve Fiorentino, the owner of Powered Up Nutrition encourages college students to learn what they are putting in their bodies.

"I think it starts with nutrition. Students believe they can outwork a bad diet and I believe that is their number one mistake. My advice is to stop eating fast foods and start eating whole and healthy foods along with supplements," Fiorentino stated.

The freshman 15 is an avoidable curse, but many students will continue to follow into its trap. The campus dining hall is not always the reason to blame as students have the option to decrease their meal plans, become active, and make healthy choices!

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5 Ethical, Sustainable Clothing Brands For Your Smart Shopping Sprees

We are probably all guilty of purchasing items that support the "fast fashion" market, but take a look at this list the next time you want to perpetuate this harmful network of stores.

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If you are unfamiliar with the term "fast fashion," your favorite clothing store may fall into this category. It is defined as clothing that is developed rapidly in response to trends, and are often marketed at low prices. These low prices mean low production cots, thus implying that there are shortcuts made in the production of materials, including environmental disregard or low wages. Fast fashion is not a sustainable practice, both for the environment and for the people who produce the clothing. There are countless horror stories from companies that perpetuate the industry, like a handwritten desperate note stitched into the Zara shirt. Here are five alternatives that will make you well-dressed, but a conscious advocate as well.

1. Everlane

Everlane is a unique brand, as they disclose the factories they use. The company prides themselves on being ethically sourced, as clothing brands are often run in suspicious or inhumane conditions in forlorn countries. They also are open about their pricing, and the cost to make their items. There is little markup on the final product. For more information on their ethical practices, visit their website here.

2. Reformation

For those willing to pay the price for eco-friendly clothing, look no further than Reformation. According to their website, they have been carbon neutral since 2015. They offer a $100 gift card if you change your utilities to a wind-powered energy source. There is an extensive list of their sustainable goals and accomplishments that you can view here.

3. Patagonia

Patagonia's brand is an outdoorsman's staple, but over the years their casual clothing has drawn a larger consumer base. Their company is not only sustainable in their practices and creation of the clothing, but they actively seek out change and tackle environmental issues. This includes donating 1% of their sales to environmental agencies or making their clothing out of recyclable materials. Further, the CEO, Rose Marcacio, used the $10 million her company received in tax cuts to donate to various non-profits centralized on climate change. Visit this link to see how you can help your local community, another initiative that Patagonia has advertised.

4. Thred Up

Thredup is an online consignment store which acts as a middle man for selling and buying old clothes. First, you order a "cleanout" bag to ship your clothes in. You may even earn some cash or credit for them! They then are listed on the website. People often do not think about the environmental cost of clothing production, namely the dramatic use of water and the non-recyclability of clothing. Thrifting and consignment stores aids in this issue, and if you are an avid online shopper, Thredup is a perfect place to shop.

5. United by Blue

United by Blue is an amazing clothing company that removed one pound of trash from the ocean with every product sold. So far, the company has removed 1,606,921 pounds of trash from our waters. Not only this, but this innovative brand has made products out of new and recycled materials, like recycled polyester. They have everything from backpacks to sweaters, so explore their page now!

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